Hill End, New South Wales

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Hill End
New South Wales

Hill End Vista 001.JPG

Hill End, 2014
Australia New South Wales location map blank.svg
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Hill End
Coordinates 33°02′0″S149°25′0″E / 33.03333°S 149.41667°E / -33.03333; 149.41667 Coordinates: 33°02′0″S149°25′0″E / 33.03333°S 149.41667°E / -33.03333; 149.41667
Population 102 (2016 census) [1]
Postcode(s) 2850
Location
LGA(s) Bathurst Regional Council

Hill End is a former gold mining town in New South Wales, Australia. The town is located in the Bathurst Regional Council local Government area.

Gold mining process of extracting gold from the ground

Gold mining is the resource extraction of gold by mining.

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In September 2018, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

Contents

History

What is now Hill End was originally a part of the Tambaroora area: Tambaroora town was a few kilometres to the north of present-day Hill End. In the 1850s the Hill End area was known as Bald Hills. In 1860 a village was proclaimed, first as Forbes, then in 1862 it was altered to Hill End. [2] In the early 1870s Hill End took over Tambaroora as the main town in the area.

Gold rush

Bernhardt Holtermann with the 630lb rock containing more than 75 percent gold from Hill End, unearthed in 1872 Bernhard otto holterman with 630lb gold from Hill End.jpg
Bernhardt Holtermann with the 630lb rock containing more than 75 percent gold from Hill End, unearthed in 1872

Hill End owes its existence to the New South Wales gold rush of the 1850s, and at its peak in the early 1870s it had a population estimated at 8,000 served by two newspapers, five banks, eight churches and twenty-eight pubs.[ citation needed ]

New South Wales experienced the first gold rush in Australia, a period generally accepted to lie between 1851 and 1880. This period in the history of New South Wales resulted in a rapid growth in the population and significant boost to the economy of the colony of New South Wales. The California Gold Rush three years prior signaled the impacts on society that gold fever would produce, both positive and negative. The New South Wales colonial government concealed the early discoveries, but various factors changed the policy.

The town's decline when the gold gave out was dramatic: by 1945 the population was 700. At the 2006 census, Hill End had a population of 166, which now has dropped to 80 people during the year 2017. The photographer Beaufoy Merlin recorded daily life in the town at its peak; his photographs can be found in the town museum/visitor information centre. The glass plate negatives are held in the State Library of New South Wales.

State Library of New South Wales library

The State Library of New South Wales, part of which is known as the Mitchell Library, is a large heritage-listed special collections, reference and research library open to the public. It is the oldest library in Australia, being the first established in New South Wales in 1826. The library is located on the corner of Macquarie Street and Shakespeare Place, in the Sydney central business district adjacent to the Domain and the Royal Botanic Gardens, in the City of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The library is a member of the National and State Libraries Australasia (NSLA) consortium.

Development

In October 1862 the Telegraph line reached Hill End (Tambaroora) from Bathurst via Sofala, the Telegraph Office opened for telegraph messages bringing the remote town into instant contact with the rest of the Colony. [3] Prior to this event communications took 12 hours by the mail stagecoach to Bathurst.

Bathurst, New South Wales City in New South Wales, Australia

Bathurst is a regional city in the Central Tablelands of New South Wales, Australia. It is about 200 kilometres (120 mi) west-northwest of Sydney and is the seat of the Bathurst Regional Council. Bathurst is the oldest inland settlement in Australia and had a population of approximately 35,000 as at the 2016 Census.

Sofala, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Sofala is a village in New South Wales, Australia, 255 kilometres (158 mi) north-west of Sydney, within Bathurst Regional Council. It is located beside the Turon River. Sofala is just off the Bathurst-Ilford Road, with only local traffic through the town itself. At the 2006 census, Sofala had a population of 208.

After delays due to lack of materials a telephone line was installed into Hill End in 1914; after 60 years of Morse code telegraph messages Hill End could now speak to adjacent towns and even Sydney if necessary. [4] [5]

In 1923 a telephone exchange was installed at the Hill End Post Office; before this calls could only be made from the Post Office to other towns. The exchange allowed new telephones installed in businesses and private homes to connect locally and to other towns [6]

Hill End artists colony

In the late 1940s Hill End was discovered by artists Russell Drysdale, who painted possibly his best-known work, The cricketers there, and Donald Friend, and it quickly became an artists' colony. Other artists who worked there included Jean Bellette. [7] Today, the Hill End artist-in-residence program aims to ensure the continuity of this connection.

Heritage listings

Hill End has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Hill End & Tambaroora family history & genealogy

The Hill End & Tambaroora Gathering Group has been in existence since the 1930s. Their goal is to provide information on the life, the families and events of a bygone era and to connect their worldwide community of descendants who have an affiliation to the district. Their website contains transcriptions of many primary records, listing names of the early miners and pioneers, that may not appear in the more mainstream family history resources.

Hill End today

Hill End B&B (Hosies) Gifts Crafts & Collectables HosiesBedbreakfast.jpg
Hill End B&B (Hosies) Gifts Crafts & Collectables

Hill End is classified as a historical site by the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS), however it is still home to a handful of residents operating the local pub, general store, cake store and antique store. The NPWS runs a museum just off the main road which contains many original photos and items of equipment from the busy days of the gold rush. A more extensive museum, the privately owned History Hill, is located a few kilometers from the town on the Bathurst Road.

NPWS has installed signs around the town to give visitors an idea of what was once in place on the now empty lots of land. Currently only a handful of buildings remain in their original form. However most of those buildings still serve the purpose they did back during the gold rush. Access to the town's lookouts is via gravel roads. A walking track in the town leads to a mine and other ruins.

The most popular tourist activity in Hill End is gold panning, with some of the older members of the community running gold panning tours in the same fossicking areas that yielded the gold which brought on the gold rush. Metal detectors or gold panning are not allowed within the historic site, however there is a fossicking area just past the cemetery, off the Mudgee Road.

The Royal Hotel and the local Bed and Breakfasts offer accommodation, and there is a range of camping options within the town limits.

Bridle Track

The Bridle Track runs from Duramana (North of Bathurst) directly to the town centre of Hill End. Generally the track can be classified as an easy 4WD track. The Bridle Track begins as a narrow tar-covered road, however it later changes to dirt. Much of the last 20 kilometres (12 mi) is single-lane. Part of the Bridle Track is currently[ when? ] closed, after a rockfall has rendered it impassible at Monaghan's Bluff.

Access

Camping

The National Parks and Wildlife Service provides several camping sites. [10]

Notable people

See also

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References

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Hill End (State Suburb)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 19 March 2018. Blue pencil.svg
  2. "Department of Lands". NSW Government Gazette. 82: 883. 6 May 1862.
  3. "TAMBAROORA". The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser . NSW. 7 October 1862. p. 2. Retrieved 30 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  4. "Hill End Telephone". Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative . NSW. 20 April 1914. p. 4. Retrieved 31 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  5. "TO HILL END". Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative . NSW. 21 May 1914. p. 19. Retrieved 31 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  6. "HILL END TELEPHONE EXCHANGE". Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative . NSW. 9 July 1923. p. 12. Retrieved 31 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  7. Gray, Anne (2010). "Jean Bellette – Chorus without Iphigenia". Collection search (work purchased 1976). National Gallery of Australia. Retrieved 8 June 2014.
  8. "Hill End Historic Site, New South Wales State Heritage Register (NSW SHR) Number H00993". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage . Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  9. "Golden Gully and Archway, New South Wales State Heritage Register (NSW SHR) Number H00614". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage . Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  10. New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service Archived November 1, 2005, at the Wayback Machine .
  11. "Anderson, Selina Sarah (Senie) (1878–1964)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 2005. Retrieved 30 March 2015.

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