Ken Harvey (American football)

Last updated
Ken Harvey
Ken Harvey 2011 (cropped).jpg
Harvey in 2011
No. 56, 57
Position: Linebacker
Personal information
Born: (1965-05-06) May 6, 1965 (age 56)
Austin, Texas
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:230 lb (104 kg)
Career information
High school: Austin (TX) Lanier
College: California
NFL Draft: 1988  / Round: 1 / Pick: 12
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:164
Tackles:828
Quarterback sacks:89.0
Fumbles recovered:11
Interceptions:1
Safeties:1
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Kenneth Ray Harvey (born May 6, 1965) is a former professional American football player in the National Football League (NFL). He currently works as a fitness trainer for space tourists and a sports writer for The Washington Post.

Contents

Football career

Harvey played professional football in the National Football League as an outside linebacker for the Phoenix Cardinals and the Washington Redskins from 1988 to 1998. He played collegiately at the University of California, Berkeley and was selected by the Cardinals in the first round (12th overall) in the 1988 NFL Draft. Harvey was a four-time Pro Bowl selection from 1994 to 1997. In his career, he appeared in 164 games and recorded 89 sacks.

Sports writer

Harvey began providing video commentary for the website of The Washington Post . His video column is titled Word on the Street with Ken Harvey. The formula for his videos is to interview Washington Redskins fans after each game. In addition to his videos he contributes to the online text column titled At The Game. [1]

Harvey also began writing a weekly sports column about the Redskins in October 2011 for the Joint Base Journal, [2] a publication produced by the Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling Public Affairs office.

Children's Book Author

Harvey has written several children's books, among them The Leftover Games, When Chocolate Milk Moved In, and The Fridge Games. [3] He also wrote a book in 2019 called Come Find Me, that was illustrated by actor, and former teammate, Terry Crews.

Of Interest

Former President of the Washington Redskins Alumni Association. [4]

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References

  1. Ken Harvey (December 30, 2006). "At The Game: Run, Tiki, Run ..." Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 25, 2012.
  2. https://archive.is/20130121165411/http://www.dcmilitary.com/section/news08. Archived from the original on 2013-01-21.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. http://www.the-hogs.net/blogs/2003/02/26/ken-harvey-interview/
  4. http://www.the-hogs.net/blogs/2003/02/26/ken-harvey-interview/