King's College Hospital

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King's College Hospital
King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
King's College Hospital1.jpg
King's College Hospital main entrance
Lambeth London UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Shown in Lambeth
Geography
Location Denmark Hill, Camberwell, London, England
Organisation
Care system National Health Service
Hospital type Teaching
Affiliated university King's College London
Services
Emergency department Yes (Major Trauma Centre)
Beds950 [1]
Speciality Liver Disease, Neurology, Neurosurgery, Dentistry, Trauma (medicine)
History
Founded1840, current site 1909
Links
Website www.kch.nhs.uk

King's College Hospital is an acute care facility in Denmark Hill, Camberwell in the London Borough of Southwark, referred to locally and by staff simply as "King's" or abbreviated internally to "KCH". It is managed by King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. It serves an inner city population of 700,000 in the London boroughs of Southwark and Lambeth, but also serves as a tertiary referral centre in certain specialties to millions of people in southern England. It is a large teaching hospital and is, with Guy's Hospital and St. Thomas' Hospital, the location of King's College London School of Medicine and one of the institutions that comprise the King's Health Partners, an academic health science centre. The chief executive is Dr Clive Kay. [2]

Acute care is a branch of secondary health care where a patient receives active but short-term treatment for a severe injury or episode of illness, an urgent medical condition, or during recovery from surgery. In medical terms, care for acute health conditions is the opposite from chronic care, or longer term care.

Denmark Hill area and road in Camberwell, in the London Borough of Southwark

Denmark Hill is an area and road in Camberwell, in the London Borough of Southwark. The hill is said to have acquired its name from Queen Anne‘s husband, Prince George of Denmark, who hunted there.

Camberwell area of south London, England, in the London Borough of Southwark and the London Borough of Lambeth

Camberwell is a district of South London, England, within the London Borough of Southwark. It is located 2.7 miles (4.3 km) southeast of Charing Cross. The name Camberwell was first applied to the Parish of St Giles, Camberwell, which included the village of Camberwell, and the hamlets of Peckham, Dulwich, Nunhead, and part of Herne Hill. Until 1889, it was part of the county of Surrey. In 1900 the original parish became the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell.

Contents

History

Early history

King's College Hospital in Portugal Street, Lincoln Inn Fields c1840s King's College Hospital, Portugal-Street, Lincoln's Inn. Wellcome L0004847.jpg
King's College Hospital in Portugal Street, Lincoln Inn Fields c1840s
Plaque marking where King's College Hospital once stood, now on LSE grounds Plaque commemorating King's College Hospital building situated on LSE grounds.jpg
Plaque marking where King's College Hospital once stood, now on LSE grounds
Kings College Hospital Denmark Hill. Wellcome M0003165.jpg
King's College Hospital Administration Building, early 20th century photo
King's College Hospital1.jpg
King's College Hospital Administration Building, 21st century photo

King's was originally opened in 1840 in the disused St Clement Danes workhouse in Portugal Street close to Lincoln's Inn Fields and King's College London itself. It was used as a training facility where medical students of King's College could practice and receive instruction from the college's own professors. The surrounding area there was composed of overcrowded slums characterised by poverty and disease. Within two years of opening, the hospital was treating 1,290 inpatients in 120 beds, with two patients sharing a bed by no means unusual. The main contractor for the new hospital was Lucas Brothers. [3] It was one of the first hospitals to start nurse training, in 1856. [4]

St Clement Danes (parish) civil parish in the metropolitan area of London

St Clement Danes was a civil parish in the metropolitan area of London, England; an ecclesiastical version remains. The parish was split between the Liberty of Westminster and the Liberty of the Duchy of Lancaster. The area is colloquially split between Aldwych and Adelphi areas associated with the larger Strand area in the extreme east of the City of Westminster. It includes hotels, restaurants, the Indian and Australian High Commissions and the London School of Economics. To its west is Charing Cross station which faces Trafalgar Square.

Workhouse place where those unable to support themselves were offered accommodation and employment

In England and Wales, a workhouse was a place where those unable to support themselves were offered accommodation and employment. The earliest known use of the term workhouse is from 1631, in an account by the mayor of Abingdon reporting that "wee haue erected wthn our borough a workehouse to sett poore people to worke".

Lincolns Inn Fields public square in London

Lincoln's Inn Fields is the largest public square in London. It was laid out in the 1630s under the initiative of the speculative builder and contractor William Newton, "the first in a long series of entrepreneurs who took a hand in developing London", as Sir Nikolaus Pevsner observes. The original plan for "laying out and planting" these fields, drawn by the hand of Inigo Jones, was said still to be seen in Lord Pembroke's collection at Wilton House in the 19th century, but is untraced. The grounds, which had remained private property, were acquired by London County Council in 1895. It is today managed by the London Borough of Camden and forms part of the southern boundary of that borough with the City of Westminster.

Pioneer of aseptic surgery Joseph Lister performed the first major elective surgery under strict antiseptic conditions in 1877. He helped propel the hospital to have a surgical unit comparable with the best in Europe. [5]

Joseph Lister 19th and 20th-century British surgeon and antiseptic pioneer

Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister,, known between 1883 and 1897 as Sir Joseph Lister, Bt., was a British surgeon and a pioneer of antiseptic surgery.

In the first years of the 20th century, demographic changes saw a decrease in the number of patients requiring treatment in the centre of London, and an increase of patients from further afield – notably Camberwell, Peckham and Brixton which were then suburbs on the outskirts of London. Following an Act of Parliament in 1904, a foundation stone was laid for the new hospital, designed by William Pite, in 1909 at its present site at Denmark Hill, south of the River Thames. The move to Denmark Hill provided the hospital with a greenfield-site nearer to its patients. The building itself incorporated modern design principles to encourage adequate ventilation, used electric clocks throughout, contained only the second internal phone installation in the UK at the time, and generated its own power through the use of diesel engines. [6]

Peckham district in south-east London

Peckham is a district of South London, England, within the London Borough of Southwark. 3.5 miles (5.6 km) south-east of Charing Cross. At the 2001 Census the Peckham ward had a population of 14,720.

Brixton District in the London Borough of Lambeth in South London

Brixton is a district of South London, England, within the London Borough of Lambeth. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London.

An act of parliament, also called primary legislation, are statutes passed by a parliament (legislature). Act of the Oireachtas is an equivalent term used in the Republic of Ireland where the legislature is commonly known by its Irish name, Oireachtas. The United States Act of Congress is based on it.

Pre-clinical training of medical students remained the responsibility of King's College London, whilst advanced medical training took place at the hospital under the auspices of a newly formed King's College Hospital Medical School. During the period of World War I, a large proportion of the hospital was used for military purposes. A dental school was established at the same site in 1923. During this time most patients were still poor and highly vulnerable to contagious diseases such as tuberculosis. In 1937 the private Guthrie wing was established with a donation from the Stock Exchange Dramatic and Operatic Society for wealthier patients to enjoy less crowded wards. During the Second World War the hospital was used for treating casualties of air raids, and was fortunate never to sustain a major direct hit. [6]

Kings College London public research university located in London, United Kingdom

King's College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, and a founding college and member institution of the federal University of London. King's was established in 1829 by King George IV and Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, when it received its first royal charter, and claims to be the fourth oldest university institution in England. In 1836, King's became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London. In the late 20th century, King's grew through a series of mergers, including with Queen Elizabeth College and Chelsea College of Science and Technology, the Institute of Psychiatry, the United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals and the Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery.

World War I 1914–1918 global war originating in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Dentistry branch of medicine

Dentistry, also known as Dental and Oral Medicine, is a branch of medicine that consists of the study, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases, disorders, and conditions of the oral cavity, commonly in the dentition but also the oral mucosa, and of adjacent and related structures and tissues, particularly in the maxillofacial area. Although primarily associated with teeth among the general public, the field of dentistry or dental medicine is not limited to teeth but includes other aspects of the craniofacial complex including the temporomandibular joint and other supporting, muscular, lymphatic, nervous, vascular, and anatomical structures.

Modern history

The Hospital's Day Surgery building King's College Hospital Day Surgery building.jpg
The Hospital's Day Surgery building
King's College Hospital, entrance to the Guthrie Clinic King's College Hospital.jpg
King's College Hospital, entrance to the Guthrie Clinic

Following the creation of the National Health Service in 1948, the hospital was granted Teaching Hospital status. In 1974 the NHS re-organisation saw King's become the centre for all health services management in its catchment area. The hospital's medical school was reunited with King's College in 1983 to form King's College School of Medicine and Dentistry. A purpose-built medical education centre, the Weston Education Centre, was built in 1997 and contains a medical library as well as hosting conferences, symposia, and professional training events as well as containing public access computer rooms for students. In 1998 King's College School of Medicine and Dentistry merged with the United Medical and Dental Schools (UMDS) of Guy's and St Thomas's Hospitals to form Guy's, King's and St Thomas's School of Medicine, commonly abbreviated to "GKT". [7] [8]

National Health Service publicly funded healthcare systems within the United Kingdom

The NHS in England, NHS Scotland, NHS Wales, and the affiliated Health and Social Care (HSC) in Northern Ireland were established together in 1948 as one of the major social reforms following the Second World War. The founding principles were that services should be comprehensive, universal and free at the point of delivery. Each service provides a comprehensive range of health services, free at the point of use for people ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom, apart from dental treatment and optical care. The English NHS also requires patients to pay prescription charges with a range of exemptions from these charges.

Guys Hospital Hospital in London

Guy's Hospital is an NHS hospital in the borough of Southwark in central London. It is part of Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and one of the institutions that comprise the King's Health Partners, an academic health science centre.

The Golden Jubilee wing, intended to host a number of outpatient clinics as well as therapy suites for speech and language, occupational therapy and physiotherapy, [9] was procured under a Private Finance Initiative contract in 2000. The works, which were carried by a joint venture of Costain and Skanska at a cost of £50 million, were completed in 2002. [9]

In December 2013 it was announced that a proposed merger with Guy's and St Thomas' and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trusts had been suspended because of doubts about the reaction of the Competition Commission. [10]

The Trust took over the management of Princess Royal University Hospital in October 2013 after the dissolution of the South London Healthcare NHS Trust. Over Christmas 2013 8 patients there waited on trolleys for more than 12 hours for admission, the largest number of trolley waits in England. [11]

Facilities

The hospital is situated mainly on Bessemer Road, which is completely contained within the hospital grounds. Although the classically-styled Hambleden Wing Entrance is still the official Main Entrance, the Golden Jubilee Wing Entrance about 100m to the north-east has become the de facto Main Entrance, due to its being directly opposite Caldecot Road (where pedestrians arrive from the Coldharbour Lane bus stops) and having the ambulance parking spaces in front of it. There are also the A&E Entrance (although there is no unaccompanied patient access between A&E and the rest of the hospital) and the Denmark Wing Entrance on Denmark Hill, whilst on Bessemer Road is the Bessemer Wing Entrance, and there is also the Cheyne Wing Entrance on an unnamed service road at the south-west of the main building. [12]

The Trust was one of the first such organisations to introduce a comprehensive public Wi-Fi service. The basic service costs £4.50 a day but is free on the children's wards. [13]

Ambulance entrance Kings college hosiptal ambulance entrance.jpg
Ambulance entrance

Location

On the opposite side of the A215 (Denmark Hill) is the Maudsley psychiatric hospital, which has close links with King's. The Institute of Psychiatry is nearby and many doctors at King's collaborate with their academic colleagues in carrying out research in conditions such as Parkinson's disease and Motor neurone disease. The Denmark Hill Campus of King's College London is also on Denmark Hill although the main Strand campus is further along the 68 bus route at Aldwych. The nearest railway station is Denmark Hill railway station. [14]

Media

The hospital was featured in Channel 4's documentary 24 Hours in A&E from 11 May 2011 to 16 June 2014. The documentary focuses on the hospital's accident and emergency department and is filmed using 70 different cameras strategically placed to capture the workings of the department without interference. [15] It was also featured in Louis Theroux's 2016 documentary Drinking to Oblivion. [16]

Notable alumni

See also

Related Research Articles

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St Thomas Hospital Hospital in London

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Maudsley Hospital Hospital in London

The Maudsley Hospital is a British psychiatric hospital in south London. The Maudsley is the largest mental health training institution in the UK. It is part of South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, and works in partnership with the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London. The hospital was one of the originating institutions in producing the Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines. It is part of the King's Health Partners academic health science centre and the National Institute for Health Research (‘NIHR’) Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health.

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Lambeth Hospital Hospital in London

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References

  1. "NursingNetUK: King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust" . Retrieved 4 November 2008.
  2. "Executive Directors". King's College Hospital NHS FT. Retrieved 28 August 2018.
  3. "Charles Lucas".
  4. Abel-Smith, Brian (1960). A History of the Nursing Profession. London: Heinemann. p. 19.
  5. "Lord Lister". King's College London. Retrieved 20 April 2018.
  6. 1 2 "King's College Hospital". Lost Hospitalsof London. Retrieved 20 April 2018.
  7. "Student-led leadership training for undergraduate healthcare students". Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK and GKT School of Medical Education, London, UK. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  8. "No. 55085". The London Gazette . 1 April 1998. p. 3780.
  9. 1 2 "Building work starts on London hospital". IFM.net. 13 July 2000. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  10. "Trust super-merger shelved". Health Service Journal. 5 December 2013. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  11. "Eight patients left on trolleys for over 12 hours". Health Service Journal. 9 January 2014. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  12. "Campus Map" (PDF). King's College London. Retrieved 20 April 2018.
  13. "Supplement: Can I watch Netflix from my hospital bed?". Health Service Journal. 28 October 2015. Retrieved 29 November 2015.
  14. "Step free Tube Guide" (PDF). Transport for London . March 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on 1 June 2019.
  15. "Channel 4 Documentaries – 24 Hours in A&E" . Retrieved 15 June 2011.
  16. "Drinking to Oblivion". BBC. Retrieved 20 April 2018.
  17. "Old stories, new histories". The Iron Roo. 28 October 2013. Retrieved 23 June 2015.

Coordinates: 51°28′05″N0°05′38″W / 51.468°N 0.0938°W / 51.468; -0.0938