List of LM-series integrated circuits

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LM393 differential comparator manufactured by National Semiconductor DOV-1X - National Semiconductor LM393N on printed circuit board-9800.jpg
LM393 differential comparator manufactured by National Semiconductor

The following is a list of LM-series integrated circuits. Many were among the first analog integrated circuits commercially produced; some were groundbreaking innovations, and many are still being used. [1] The LM series originated with integrated circuits made by National Semiconductor. [1] [2] The prefix LM stands for linear monolithic, referring to the analog components integrated onto a single piece of silicon. [3] Because of the popularity of these parts, many of them were second-sourced by other manufacturers who kept the sequence number as an aid to identification of compatible parts. [2] Several generations of pin-compatible descendants of the original parts have since become de facto standard electronic components. [4]

National Semiconductor was an American semiconductor manufacturer which specialized in analog devices and subsystems, formerly with headquarters in Santa Clara, California, United States. The company produced power management integrated circuits, display drivers, audio and operational amplifiers, communication interface products and data conversion solutions. National's key markets included wireless handsets, displays and a variety of broad electronics markets, including medical, automotive, industrial and test and measurement applications.

A de facto standard is a custom or convention that has achieved a dominant position by public acceptance or market forces. De facto is a Latin phrase that means in fact in the sense of "in practice but not necessarily ordained by law" or "in practice or actuality, but not officially established", as opposed to de jure.

Contents

Operational amplifiers


Part numberPredecessor Obsolete? Description
LM10 Op-amp with an adjustable voltage reference [5]
LM101
LM201
LM301
μA709 [1] General purpose op-amp with external compensation [6]
LM107
LM207
LM307
μA709YesGeneral purpose op-amp [7]
LM108
LM208
LM308
YesPrecision op-amp [8]
LM112
LM212
LM312
YesMicropower op-amp with external compensation [9]
LM118
LM218
LM318
Precision, fast general purpose op-amp with external compensation [10]
LM321Low power op-amp [11]
LM124
LM224
LM324
LM2902
Quadruple wide supply range op-amps [12]
LM143
LM343
YesHigh Voltage Operational Amplifier
LM144
LM344
YesHigh Voltage, High Slew Rate Operational Amplifier
LM146
LM346
only LM146Programmable quadruple op-amps [13] [14]
LM148
LM248
LM348
General purpose quadruple op-amps [15]
LM158
LM258
LM358
LM2904
Low power, wide supply range dual op-amps [16]
LM392Low power dual op-amps and comparator [17]
LM432LM358, LMV431Dual op-amps with fixed 2.5 V reference [18]
LM611Op-amp with an adjustable voltage reference [19]
LM614Quadruple op-amps with an adjustable voltage reference [20]
LM675Power op-amp with a maximal current output of 3 amperes [21]
LM709YesGeneral purpose op-amp [22]
LM741LM709General purpose op-amp [23] Widely used.
LM748General purpose op-amp with external compensation [24]
LM833Dual high speed audio operational amplifiers [25]
LM837Low noise quadruple op-amps [26]

Differential comparators


Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM306High speed differential comparator with strobes [27]
LM111
LM211
LM311
LM106
LM710
High speed differential comparator with strobes [28]
LM119
LM219
LM319
LM711(?)High speed dual comparators [29]
LM139
LM239
LM339
LM2901
Quadruple wide supply range comparators [30]
LM160
LM360
μA760High speed comparator with complementary TTL outputs [31]
LM161
LM361
only LM161High speed comparator with strobed complementary TTL outputs [32] [33]
LM193
LM293
LM393
LM2903
Dual wide supply range comparators [34]
LM397General purpose comparator with an input common mode that includes ground [35]
LM613Dual op-amps, dual comparators and adjustable reference [36]

Current-mode amplifiers


Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM359Dual, high speed, programmable current mode amplifiers [37]

Instrumentation amplifiers


Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM363YesPrecision instrumentation amplifier [38]

Audio amplifiers


Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM3802.5 W audio power amplifier (fixed 34 dB gain) [39]
LM3845 W audio power amplifier (fixed 34 dB gain) [40]
LM187520 W audio power amplifier (up to 90 dB gain) [41]
LM1876Dual 20 W audio power amplifier with Mute and Standby Modes (up to 90 dB gain) [42]
LM386 Low voltage audio power amplifier [43]
LM3875 High-performance 56 W audio power amplifier [44]
LM3886High-performance 68 W audio power amplifier [45]

Precision reference


Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM113
LM313
only LM313Temperature compensated Zener reference diode, 1.22 V breakdown voltage [46] [47]
LM329Temperature compensated Zener reference diode, 6.9 V breakdown voltage [48]
LM136
LM236
LM336
2.5 V or 5 V Zener reference diode with temperature coefficient trimmer [49]
LM368Yes2.5 V precision voltage reference [50]
LM169
LM369
LM199Yes2.5 V temperature compensated precision voltage reference [51]
LM185
LM285
LM385
Fixed (1.2 V, 2.5 V) or adjustable micropower voltage reference [52]
LM199
LM299
LM399
LM199 & LM299Fixed (6.95 V) voltage reference [53]
LM431Adjustable precision Zener shunt regulator (2.5 V-36 V) [54]

Voltage regulators


Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM105
LM305
LM100Adjustable positive voltage regulator (4.5 V-40 V) [55]
LM109
LM309
5-volt regulator (up to 1 A) [56]
LM117
LM317
Adjustable 1.5 A positive voltage regulator (1.25 V-37 V) [57]
LM120
LM320
Fixed 1.5 A negative voltage regulator (-5 V, -12 V, -15 V) [58]
LM123
LM323
Fixed 3 A, 5-volt positive voltage regulator [59]
LM325YesDual ±15-volt voltage regulator [60]
LM3305-volt positive voltage regulator, 0.6 V input-output difference [61]
LM333YesAdjustable 3 A negative voltage regulator (-1.2 V to -32 V) [62]
LM237
LM337
Adjustable 1.5 A negative voltage regulator (-1.2 V to -37 V) [63]
LM138
LM338
Adjustable 5 A voltage regulator (1.2 V-32 V) [64]
LM140
LM340
LM78xx1 A positive voltage regulator (5 V, 12 V, 15 V), can be adjustable [65] [66]
LM341
LM78Mxx
0.5 A protected positive voltage regulators (5 V, 12 V, 15 V) [67]
LM145
LM345
YesFixed 3 A, -5-volt negative voltage regulator [68]
LM150
LM350
only LM150Adjustable 3 A, positive voltage regulator (1.2 V-33 V) [69] [70]
LM723 Low power variable voltage regulator
LM78xx Fixed 1 A positive voltage regulators (5 V-24 V) [71]
LM79xx Fixed 1.5 A negative voltage regulators (-5 V, -12 V, -15 V) [72]
LM2576Fixed and adjustable 3 A buck/buck-boost switching regulators [73]

Voltage-to-frequency converters


Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM231
LM331
Precision voltage-to-frequency converter (1 Hz-100 kHz) [74]

Current sources


Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM134
LM234
LM334
Adjustable current source (1 μA-10 mA) [75]

Temperature sensors and thermostats

Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM19Temperature sensor, 2.5 °C accuracy [76]
LM20Temperature sensor, 1.5 °C accuracy [77]
LM26Factory preset thermostat, 3 °C accuracy [78]
LM27Factory preset thermostat (120 °C-150 °C), 3 °C accuracy [79]
LM34Precision Fahrenheit temperature sensor, 0.5 °F accuracy [80]
LM35Precision Celsius temperature sensor, 0.25 °C accuracy [81]
LM45Precision Celsius temperature sensor, 2 °C accuracy [82]
LM50Single supply Celsius temperature sensor, 2 °C accuracy [83]
LM56Dual output resistor programmable thermostat with analog temperature sensor [84]
LM60
LM61
LM62
Single supply Celsius temperature sensors
(The difference between the components is the voltage scale) [85]
LM75ADigital temperature sensor and programmable thermostat. [86]
LM135
LM235
LM335
Precision Zener temperature sensor, 1 °C accuracy [87]

Others

Part numberPredecessorObsolete?Description
LM102
LM202
LM302
YesVoltage Followers
LM110
LM210
LM310
YesVoltage Followers
LM566YesVoltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO)
LM567NoTone decoder
LM3914 Bargraph display driver (linear steps)
LM3915 Bargraph display driver (logarithmic steps)
LM13700 Operational Transconductance Amplifier (OTA)

Notes

See also

4000-series integrated circuits

The 4000 series is a CMOS logic family of integrated circuits (ICs) first introduced in 1968 by RCA. Almost all IC manufacturers active during this initial era fabricated models for this series. It is still in use today.

7400-series integrated circuits series of transistor–transistor logic integrated circuits

The 7400 series of integrated circuits (ICs) are the most popular logic families. In 1964, Texas Instruments introduced the first members of their ceramic package SN5400 series transistor–transistor logic (TTL) logic chips, later a low-cost plastic package SN7400 series was introduced in 1966 which quickly gained over 50% of the logic chip market, and eventually becoming de facto standardized electronic components. Over the decades, many generations of pin-compatible descendant families evolved to include support for low power CMOS technology, lower supply voltages, and surface mount packages.

In electronics, pin-compatible devices are electronic components, generally integrated circuits or expansion cards, sharing a common footprint and with the same functions assigned or usable on the same pins. Pin compatibility is a property desired by systems integrators as it allows a product to be updated without redesigning printed circuit boards, which can reduce costs and decrease time to market.

Related Research Articles

Transistor Basic electronics component

A transistor is a semiconductor device used to amplify or switch electronic signals and electrical power. It is composed of semiconductor material usually with at least three terminals for connection to an external circuit. A voltage or current applied to one pair of the transistor's terminals controls the current through another pair of terminals. Because the controlled (output) power can be higher than the controlling (input) power, a transistor can amplify a signal. Today, some transistors are packaged individually, but many more are found embedded in integrated circuits.

Texas Instruments American semiconductor designer and manufacturer

Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) is an American technology company that designs and manufactures semiconductors and various integrated circuits, which it sells to electronics designers and manufacturers globally. Its headquarters are in Dallas, Texas, United States. TI is one of the top-10 semiconductor companies worldwide, based on sales volume. Texas Instruments's focus is on developing analog chips and embedded processors, which account for more than 80% of their revenue. TI also produces TI digital light processing technology and education technology products including calculators, microcontrollers and multi-core processors. To date, TI has more than 45,000 patents worldwide.

Transistor–transistor logic (TTL) is a logic family built from bipolar junction transistors. Its name signifies that transistors perform both the logic function and the amplifying function ; it is the same naming convention used in resistor–transistor logic (RTL) and diode–transistor logic (DTL).

In electronics, a linear regulator is a system used to maintain a steady voltage. The resistance of the regulator varies in accordance with the load resulting in a constant voltage output. The regulating device is made to act like a variable resistor, continuously adjusting a voltage divider network to maintain a constant output voltage and continually dissipating the difference between the input and regulated voltages as waste heat. By contrast, a switching regulator uses an active device that switches on and off to maintain an average value of output. Because the regulated voltage of a linear regulator must always be lower than input voltage, efficiency is limited and the input voltage must be high enough to always allow the active device to drop some voltage.

555 timer IC Most popular integrated circuit ever manufactured

The 555 timer IC is an integrated circuit (chip) used in a variety of timer, pulse generation, and oscillator applications. The 555 can be used to provide time delays, as an oscillator, and as a flip-flop element. Derivatives provide two (556) or four (558) timing circuits in one package.

A bandgap voltage reference is a temperature independent voltage reference circuit widely used in integrated circuits. It produces a fixed (constant) voltage regardless of power supply variations, temperature changes and circuit loading from a device. It commonly has an output voltage around 1.25 V. This circuit concept was first published by David Hilbiber in 1964. Bob Widlar, Paul Brokaw and others followed up with other commercially successful versions.

Analog Devices company

Analog Devices, Inc. (ADI), also known simply as Analog, is an American multinational semiconductor company specializing in data conversion, signal processing and power management technology, headquartered in Norwood, Massachusetts. In 2012, Analog Devices led the worldwide data converter market with a 48.5% share, according to analyst firm Databeans.

Bob Widlar American electrical engineer

Robert John Widlar was an American electronics engineer and a designer of linear integrated circuits (ICs).

LM317 adjustable linear voltage regulator

The LM317 is a popular adjustable positive linear voltage regulator. It was designed by Robert C Dobkin in 1976 while he worked at National Semiconductor.

Bob Pease American electronics engineer and technical author

Robert Allen Pease was an analog integrated circuit design expert and technical author. He designed several very successful "best-seller" integrated circuits, many of them in continuous production for multiple decades. These include the LM331 voltage-to-frequency converter, and the LM337 adjustable negative voltage regulator.

2N2222 general purpose NPN bipolar junction transistor


The 2N2222 is a common NPN bipolar junction transistor (BJT) used for general purpose low-power amplifying or switching applications. It is designed for low to medium current, low power, medium voltage, and can operate at moderately high speeds. It was originally made in the TO-18 metal can as shown in the picture.

78xx Series of voltage regulator integrated circuits

78xx is a family of self-contained fixed linear voltage regulator integrated circuits. The 78xx family is commonly used in electronic circuits requiring a regulated power supply due to their ease-of-use and low cost.

LM386

The LM386 is an integrated circuit containing a low voltage audio power amplifier. It is suitable for battery-powered devices such as radios, guitar amplifiers, and hobby electronics projects. The IC consists of an 8 pin dual in-line package (DIP-8) and can output 0.25 to 1 watts of power depending on the model using a 9-volt power supply.

LM3914

The LM3914 is an integrated circuit (IC) designed by National Semiconductor and used to operate displays that visually show the magnitude of an analog signal.

Robert C. Dobkin is an American electrical engineer, co-founder of Linear Technology Corporation, and veteran linear (analog) integrated circuit (IC) designer.

References

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  19. "LM611". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 21 September 2013.
  20. "LM614". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 21 September 2013.
  21. "LM675". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 21 September 2013.
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  32. "LM161". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
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  35. "LM397". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  36. "LM613". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  37. "LM359". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  38. "LM363". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  39. "LM380". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  40. "LM384". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  41. "LM1875". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  42. "LM1876". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
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  45. "LM3886". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 11 March 2013.
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  47. "LM313". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  48. "LM329". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  49. "LM236-2.5". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  50. "LM368". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  51. "LM169". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  52. "LM185-1.2-N". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  53. "LM199". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  54. "LM431". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  55. "LM105". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  56. "LM109". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  57. "LM317". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  58. "LM120". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
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  60. "LM325". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
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  62. "LM333". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  63. "LM237". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  64. "LM138". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  65. "LM140L". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  66. "LM140JAN". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  67. "LM341". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  68. "LM145". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  69. "LM150". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  70. "LM350-N". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
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  72. "LM7905". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 25 March 2015.
  73. "LM2576". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 12 June 2016.
  74. "LM231". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  75. "LM134". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
  76. "LM19". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  77. "LM20". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  78. "LM26". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  79. "LM27". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  80. "LM34". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  81. "LM35". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  82. "LM45". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  83. "LM50". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
  84. "LM57". Texas Instruments. Retrieved 22 September 2013.
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Further reading

Historical Data Books
Historical Design Books