Lola T590

Last updated
Lola T590 [1] [2]
Category C Sports/Sports 2000
Constructor Lola
Technical specifications
Chassis Fiberglass bodywork, aluminum monocoque or tubular rear subframe
Suspension (front)Double wishbones, coil springs over shock absorbers, anti-roll bar
Suspension (rear)Reversed lower wishbones, top links, twin radius rods, anti-roll bar
Length143 in (3,632.2 mm)
Width67 in (1,701.8 mm)
Height35 in (889.0 mm)
Axle track 55.5 in (1,409.7 mm)
Wheelbase 95 in (2,413.0 mm)
Engine Ford-Cosworth, Ford-Cosworth BDG, or Hart 420R [3] 2.0 L (122.0 cu in) OHC/DOHC I4 naturally-aspirated mid-engined (Sports 2000)
Volkswagen or Mazda 13B 1.3–2.1 L (79–128 cu in) I4/2-rotor wankel naturally-aspirated mid-engined (C Sports) [4]
Transmission Hewland Mk.9 4/5-speed [5] manual
Power210 hp (160 kW)
Weight1,080–1,286 lb (490–583 kg)
Competition history
Debut1980

The Lola T590, and its evolutions, the Lola T592 [6] , the Lola T592S [7] , the Lola T594 [8] , the Lola T594C [9] , the Lola T596 [10] , the Lola T596C [11] , the Lola T598 [12] , and the Lola T598C [13] , are a series of Sports 2000 and C Sports prototype race cars, designed, developed and built by British manufacturer Lola, for sports car racing, in 1980. [14] [15] [16]

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lola T90/00</span> Racing car designed and built by Reynard Racing Cars

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The Lola T150, and it's the deriatives, the T152 and T153, were open-wheel racing car chassis, designed and built by Lola Cars to compete in USAC IndyCar racing series, between 1968 and 1970. The T150 and T153 were powered by the 159 cu in (2.61 L) 780–900 hp (580–670 kW) Ford Indy V-8 turbo engine; while the T152 chassis used a 159 cu in (2.61 L) 900 hp (670 kW) Offenhauser 4-cylinder turbo engine. Both the T150 and T152 used a unique four-wheel-drive system, which would be banned after the 1969 season. The T153 only used a conventional two-wheel-drive (rear-wheel-drive setup. The different chassis would, over the span of three years, win a total of 9 races, all while being driven by Al Unser.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lola T90</span> Racing car designed and built by Reynard Racing Cars

The Lola T90 is a highly successful and competitive open-wheel racing car chassis, designed and built by Lola Cars to compete in USAC IndyCar racing series, that successfully won the 1966 Indianapolis 500, being driven by Graham Hill. It was powered by either the 425–500 hp (317–373 kW), naturally-aspirated, 256 cu in (4.20 L), Ford Indy V-8 engine, or the 168 cu in (2.75 L), 520 hp (390 kW), Offenhauser 4-cylinder turbo engine.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lola T900</span> Racing car designed and built by Reynard Racing Cars

The Lola T900 is an open-wheel racing car chassis, designed and built by Lola Cars that competed in the CART open-wheel racing series, for competition in the 1985 IndyCar season. It won a total of 5 races that season, with Al Unser Jr. taking 2 wins, and Mario Andretti taking 3 wins, while narrowly missing out on another win at that year's Indianapolis 500. It was powered by the 800 hp (600 kW) Ford-Cosworth DFX.

The Lola T160 is a series of purpose-built Group 7 sports prototype race cars, designed and developed by British chassis manufacturer Lola Cars, specifically to compete in the Can-Am series in 1968. It was the successor to the competitive T70, sharing similar design knowledge and cues. Lola built the chassis, constructed out of fiberglass, and molded into an aluminum monocoque. This meant the car was light was lightweight, weighing only 670 kg (1,480 lb). The chassis was designed to accept a small-block engine, but most cars were powered by either the Chevrolet ZL1 or the Ford FE "big-block" motors, generating about 625–750 hp (466–559 kW); mated to a 4-speed or 5-speed Hewland L.G.500 or L.G.600 manual transmission. This made the cars very fast, with a notably excellent power-to-weight ratio. It was used in active competition until 1971, and was succeeded and used alongside the new T220 in 1970.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lola Mk1</span>

The Lola Mk1 is the first sports racing car made by Lola, under the leadership and guidance of Eric Broadley, in 1958. The body was designed and developed by chief stylist Maurice Gomm, made out of a steel or fiberglass tubular spaceframe chassis, covered in a low-profile, sleek, aluminum skin. The 80 hp (60 kW), 1,098 cc (67.0 cu in), Coventry Climax FWA four-cylinder engine was designed by Harry Mundy and Walter Hassan. The car used a 4-speed manual transmission, and was lightweight, only weighing in at a mere 812–840 lb (368–381 kg). It also notably won its class at the 1960 12 Hours of Sebring, being driven by Charles Vögele and Peter Ashdown. At least 32 cars were known to have been built, but the actual number is believed to be between 38 and 42.

The Lola T530 is a purpose-built Can-Am sports prototype, designed by British manufacturer Lola Cars in for the revived Can-Am series 1980. It was very successful, winning 7 of the 9 races in its first season of competition alone, and gave Patrick Tambay the championship with Carl A. Haas racing Team. Geoff Brabham won the championship in 1981; despite only winning 2 races. It was used in Can-Am racing until 1983. It was later used in the international Interserie racing series, and the British Thundersports racing series, between 1984 and 1988. Between 1980 and 1988, it scored a total of 32 race wins, and 43 podium finishes; a very impressive tally indeed. As with all other full-size Can-Am cars of the time, it used a mid-mounted 5-liter, naturally-aspirated, Chevrolet V8 engine. A total of 10 chassis' were built.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lola T700</span> Open-wheel racing car chassis

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The Lola T270 is an open-wheel racing car chassis, designed, developed and built by Lola Cars, that competed in the CART open-wheel racing series, for competition in the 1972 and 1973 USAC Championship Car seasons. It didn't win any races, with its best race result being a 2nd-place finish; being driven by Wally Dallenbach at Michigan in 1972. Its best Indianapolis 500 result was a 4th-place finish; being driven by Sam Sessions, in the 1972 race. It was powered by three different engines; including Ford and Foyt-badged Ford V8 turbo engines, or an Offenhauser four-cylinder turbo engine.

The Lola T80 was an open-wheel race car, developed and built by British manufacturer Lola, and designed by Eric Broadley, in 1965. Its best race result and position was a 4th-place finish, at Trenton in 1965; being driven by American Bud Tingelstad. Its best result at the Indianapolis 500 was a 9th-place finish, with Al Unser driving at the 1965 race. It was powered by the Ford quad-cam DOHC Indy V8 engine, developing around 425 hp (317 kW) @ 8,000 rpm. It was used alongside, and eventually succeeded, by the T90.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lola T210</span> Group 6 sports prototype race cars

The Lola T210, and its evolution, the Lola T212, are Group 6 sports prototype race cars, designed, developed and built by British manufacturer Lola, for the newly created European 2-Litre sports car racing championship, in 1970.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lola T310</span>

The Lola T310 is a Group 7 sports prototype race car, designed, developed, and built by the British manufacturer and constructor Lola, to compete in the Can-Am championship from the 1972 season.

The Lola T260 is a Group 7 sports prototype race car, designed, developed, and built by the British manufacturer and constructor Lola, under the leadership and guidance of Eric Broadley, to compete in the North American Can-Am championship from the 1971 season.

The Lola T120, also known as the BMW G767, was a Group 7 sports prototype race, designed, developed and built by British manufacturer Lola, specifically to compete in hill climb racing, in 1967. It was powered by a unique 2-liter, 16-valve, four-cylinder engine, designed by Ludwig Apfelbeck, to produce between 260 and 280 hp @ 8500 rpm, and was itself based on the M10 engine.

The Lola T490 is a 2-litre Group 5 Sports 2000 prototype race car, designed, developed and built by British manufacturer Lola, for 2-litre sports car racing, in 1977.

References

  1. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  2. "Historic Sports 2000". www.historicsports2000.com.
  3. "Lola T594C" . Retrieved 2 October 2022.
  4. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  5. "1980 Lola T590".
  6. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  7. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  8. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  9. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  10. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  11. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  12. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  13. "Lola Heritage". www.lolaheritage.co.uk.
  14. "Lola T590 chassis #32". racecarsdirect.com.
  15. "Lola T590" . Retrieved 27 September 2022.
  16. "Larry Webster's 1980 Lola T590".