Lola T333CS

Last updated
Lola T333CS
Category Can-Am
Constructor Lola
Designer(s) Eric Broadley
Technical specifications [1]
Chassis Steel and aluminium monocoque with load-bearing engine-transmission assembly
Suspension (front)Independent, wishbones and inclined coil spring/shock absorber units
Suspension (rear)Independent, single top link, twin tower links and coil spring/shock absorber units
Axle track Front: 1,625 mm (64.0 in)
Rear: 1,625 mm (64.0 in)
Wheelbase 2,591 mm (102.0 in)
Engine Mid-engine, longitudinally mounted, 4,940 cc (301.5 cu in), Chevrolet, 90° V8, NA
Transmission Hewland DG300 5-speed manual
Power500–600 hp (373–447 kW) [2]
325–420 lb⋅ft (441–569 N⋅m) [3]
Weight650–665 kg (1,433–1,466 lb) [4]
Competition history
Notable entrants Carl Hass Racing
Team VDS
Hogan Racing
Notable drivers Flag of France.svg Patrick Tambay
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Peter Gethin
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Alan Jones
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Warwick Brown
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Jacky Ickx
Debut 1977 Can-Am Mont-Tremblant
RacesWins Poles F/Laps
49211721
Teams' Championships3
Constructors' Championships3
Drivers' Championships3: (1977 Can-Am, 1978 Can-Am, 1979 Can-Am)

The Lola T333CS was a race car designed and built by Lola Cars for use in SCCA Can-Am Series racing and made its racing debut in 1977. The T333CS was highly successful; winning 21 races, and 3 championships with three different drivers, between 1977 and 1979. The Lola T333CS commonly used the 5.0-litre Chevrolet V8 engine. [5] [6] [7] [8] [9]

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References

  1. "Lola T332 at OldRacingCars.com"
  2. "Lola".
  3. "1975 Lola T400 Chevrolet Specifications".
  4. "Lola T332 HU16".
  5. "Lola Heritage".
  6. https://www.oldracingcars.com/lola/t332/
  7. http://www.racingyears.com/chassis.php?Chassis=Lola%20T333CS%20-%20Chevrolet
  8. "SCCA Can-Am race".
  9. http://www.autocourse.ca/archives/usa/canam/1980/canam.htm [ bare URL ]