Mosley Street

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Mosley Street looking south-west towards St Peter's Square. Mosley Street, Manchester - July 2018.jpg
Mosley Street looking south-west towards St Peter's Square.

Mosley Street is a street in Manchester, England. It runs between its junction with Piccadilly Gardens and Market Street to St Peter's Square. Beyond St Peter's Square it becomes Lower Mosley Street. It is the location of several Grade II and Grade II* listed buildings.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Piccadilly Gardens

Piccadilly Gardens is a green space in Manchester city centre, England, between Market Street and the edge of the Northern Quarter. Piccadilly runs eastwards from the junction of Market Street with Mosley Street to the junction of London Road with Ducie Street; to the south are the gardens and paved areas. The area was reconfigured in 2002 with a water feature and concrete pavilion by Japanese architect Tadao Ando.

Market Street, Manchester retail street in Manchester, England

Market Street is one of the principal retail streets in Manchester, England. It runs from its junction with Piccadilly and Mosley Street, close to Piccadilly Gardens, in the east to where it meets St. Mary's Gate at the crossroads with Exchange Street and New Cathedral Street in the west. St Mary's Gate then continues to where it meets Deansgate (A56). Other major streets crossed are High Street, Corporation Street, Cross Street and Fountain Street.

Contents

Mosley Street Metrolink station was located near Piccadilly Gardens. In 2009, the tram lines were reconstructed, and buses used Mosley Street en route to Piccadilly Gardens until May 2011, when they were rerouted along Portland Street. The street is now exclusively used by Metrolink trams and no cars are permitted on the street. The tram stop closed on 17 May 2013.

Portland Street, Manchester street in Manchester, United Kingdom

Portland Street is a street which runs from Piccadilly at its junction with Newton Street southwards to Oxford Street at its junction with Chepstow Street in Manchester, England. The major buildings of Portland Street include the largest former warehouse in the city centre, Watts Warehouse, the former Bank of England Building and other former warehouses on the corners of Princess Street.

Manchester Metrolink light rail and tram system in Greater Manchester, England

Metrolink is a tram/light rail system in Greater Manchester, England. The system is owned by Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) and operated and maintained under contract by a Keolis/Amey consortium. In 2017/18, 41.2 million passenger journeys were made on the system.

History

The streets in the neighbourhood were laid in the 1780s and by the early 19th century Mosley Street was the centre of the fashionable residential part of town with institutions such as the Portico Library and the Royal Manchester Institution. The street was named after Nicholas Mosley who in 1596 bought the manor of Manchester for £3,500. [1] His father, Edward Mosley, already owned Hough End Hall, which was the manor house of Withington. [2] [3] The Mosley family sold their manorial rights to Manchester City Council for £200,000 in 1846. [4] [5] In the first quarter of the 19th century the street was home to Hugh Birley, Samuel Brooks and Nathan Mayer Rothschild.

Royal Manchester Institution

The Royal Manchester Institution (RMI) was an English learned society founded on 1 October 1823 at a public meeting held in the Exchange Room by Manchester merchants, local artists and others keen to dispel the image of Manchester as a city lacking in culture and taste.

Nicholas Mosley (mayor) Textile manufacturer and Lord Mayor of London

Sir Nicholas Mosley, also spelt Mosly and Moseley, was a manufacturer of woolen cloth, who subsequently became lord of the manor of Manchester, and a Lord Mayor of London for the year 1599 to 1600.

Manor an estate in land to which is incident the right to hold a manorial court

A manor in English law is an estate in land to which is incident the right to hold a court termed court baron, that is to say a manorial court. The proper unit of tenure under the feudal system is the fee, on which the manor became established through the process of time, akin to the modern establishment of a "business" upon a freehold site. The manor is nevertheless often described as the basic feudal unit of tenure and is historically connected with the territorial divisions of the march, county, hundred, parish and township.

The nature of the street changed after 1827, when a house on the corner of Market Street was converted into a hotel and rooms in its coach house on Back Mosley Street were used as a warehouse. Several more warehouses were built after 1830 and large houses occupied by the gentry were speculatively converted to warehouses. [6] The Congregational Chapel, in Cannon Street, was replaced by a chapel in Mosley Street and in 1848 the congregation moved again out of the centre of Manchester, to the chapel, in Cavendish Street, Chorlton on Medlock.

Notable buildings

Manchester Art Gallery publicly owned art gallery in Manchester, UK

Manchester Art Gallery, formerly Manchester City Art Gallery, is a publicly owned art museum on Mosley Street in Manchester city centre. The main gallery premises were built for a learned society in 1823 and today its collection occupies three connected buildings, two of which were designed by Sir Charles Barry. Both Barry's buildings are listed. The building that links them was designed by Hopkins Architects following an architectural design competition managed by RIBA Competitions. It opened in 2002 following a major renovation and expansion project undertaken by the art gallery.

The Portico Library

The Portico Library, The Portico or Portico Library and Gallery on Mosley Street, Manchester, is an independent subscription library designed in the Greek Revival style by Thomas Harrison of Chester and built between 1802 and 1806. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a Grade II* listed building, having been designated on 25 February 1952, and has been described as "the most refined little building in Manchester".

38 and 42 Mosley Street

38 and 42 Mosley Street in Manchester, England, is a double-block Victorian bank constructed between 1862 and c. 1880 for the Manchester and Salford Bank. It was occupied in 2001 by the Royal Bank of Scotland. The original block of 1862 was the "last great work" of Edward Walters, and the extension of the 1880s was by his successors Barker and Ellis. It is a Grade II* listed building.

East side
Classical architecture architectural style

Classical Architecture usually denotes architecture which is more or less consciously derived from the principles of Greek and Roman architecture of classical antiquity, or sometimes even more specifically, from the works of Vitruvius. Different styles of classical architecture have arguably existed since the Carolingian Renaissance, and prominently since the Italian Renaissance. Although classical styles of architecture can vary greatly, they can in general all be said to draw on a common "vocabulary" of decorative and constructive elements. In much of the Western world, different classical architectural styles have dominated the history of architecture from the Renaissance until the second world war, though it continues to inform many architects to this day.

Thomas Harrison (architect) English architect

Thomas Harrison was an English architect and bridge engineer who trained in Rome, where he studied classical architecture. Returning to England, he won the competition in 1782 for the design of Skerton Bridge in Lancaster. After moving to Lancaster he worked on local buildings, received commissions for further bridges, and designed country houses in Scotland. In 1786 Harrison was asked to design new buildings within the grounds of Lancaster and Chester castles, projects that occupied him, together with other works, until 1815. On both sites he created accommodation for prisoners, law courts, and a shire hall, while working on various other public buildings, gentlemen's clubs, churches, houses, and monuments elsewhere. His final major commission was for the design of Grosvenor Bridge in Chester.

John Dalton English chemist, meteorologist and physicist

John Dalton FRS was an English chemist, physicist, and meteorologist. He is best known for introducing the atomic theory into chemistry, and for his research into colour blindness, sometimes referred to as Daltonism in his honour.

West side

See also

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References

  1. Thomas Stuart Willan (1980). Elizabethan Manchester. Manchester University Press. p. 9.
  2. John J. Parkinson-Bailey (2000). Manchester: An Architectural History. Manchester University Press. p. 3.
  3. "Withington Area History". google.com/site/withingtonhistory.
  4. James Tait (1904). Mediæval Manchester and the Beginnings of Lancashire. Manchester University Press. p. 37.
  5. "THE MOSLEY FAMILY OF MANCHESTER". thornber.net.
  6. John J. Parkinson-Bailey (2000). Manchester: An Architectural History. Manchester University Press. p. 31.
  7. Historic England, "Portico Library and Bank Public House (1197930)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 20 April 2012
  8. An oasis of calm in the heart of the city, The Portico Library, retrieved 1 May 2012
  9. Historic England, "City Art Gallery (1282980)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 20 April 2012
  10. Historic England, "14 & 16 Princess Street, includes 77 and 77A Mosley Street (1388295)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 20 April 2012
  11. Historic England, "The Bradford and Bingley Building Society 10, Mosley Street (1220063)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 20 April 2012
  12. Historic England, "12, Mosley Streetl (1197928)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 20 April 2012
  13. Historic England. "Harvest House (1220153)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 20 April 2012.
  14. Historic England, "Colwyn Chambers (1197929)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 20 April 2012
  15. Historic England, "Royal Bank of Scotland, 38 and 42 Mosley Street (1220165)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 20 April 2012
Sources

Coordinates: 53°28′46″N2°14′28″W / 53.47948°N 2.24112°W / 53.47948; -2.24112