38 and 42 Mosley Street

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38 and 42 Mosley Street, Manchester

38 and 42 Mosley Street in Manchester, England, is a double-block Victorian bank constructed between 1862 and c. 1880 for the Manchester and Salford Bank. It was occupied in 2001 by the Royal Bank of Scotland. [1] The original block of 1862 was the "last great work" [1] of Edward Walters, and the extension of the 1880s was by his successors Barker and Ellis. It is a Grade II* listed building. [2]

Contents

The bank, on the corner of Mosley Street and York Street, is constructed in the Italian palazzo style. The original block has three storeys and seven bays, and the extension has four bays. It is built in ashlar, with slate roofs. [2]

The ground floors are rusticated with massive pilasters, and the piano nobile above has windows with substantial pediments. [1] The roofline carries a balustrade with urns and chimneys. [1] The interior contains a "very fine banking hall with columns and coffered ceiling". [2] An extension of 1975 "palely follow(s) the nineteenth century rhythms. [1]

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Hartwell 2001, pp. 173-4.
  2. 1 2 3 Historic England, "Royal Bank of Scotland, 38 and 42 Mosley Street (1220165)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 20 April 2012

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References

Coordinates: 53°28′49″N2°14′25″W / 53.4803°N 2.2403°W / 53.4803; -2.2403