Corn Exchange, Manchester

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Corn Exchange, Manchester
Produce Exchange, Manchester.jpg
The Corn Exchange
Location Manchester, England
Address Exchange Square, Manchester, M4 3TR
Opening date2000 (redeveloped 2015)
No. of stores and services17
Total retail floor area 141,722sq ft
No. of floors3
Website www.cornexchangemanchester.co.uk

Corn Exchange, Manchester is a grade II listed building [1] in Manchester, England. The building was originally used as a corn exchange and was previously named the Corn & Produce Exchange, and subsequently The Triangle. Following the IRA bomb in 1996 it was renovated and was a modern shopping centre till July 2014. The building was recently sold to Aviva investors and has been re-developed into a dining destination with 17 food outlets. [2]

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Corn exchange building where farmers and merchants traded cereal grains

A corn exchange is a building where merchants traded corn. Such trade was common in towns and cities across England until the 19th century, but as the trade became centralised in the 20th century many such buildings were used for other purposes. Several have since become historical landmarks.

Provisional Irish Republican Army Disbanded Irish Republican paramilitary group

The Provisional Irish Republican Army was an Irish republican paramilitary organisation that sought to end British rule in Northern Ireland, facilitate the reunification of Ireland and bring about an independent republic encompassing all of Ireland. It was the biggest and most active republican paramilitary group during the Troubles. It saw itself as the successor to the original IRA and called itself simply the Irish Republican Army (IRA), or Óglaigh na hÉireann in Irish, and was broadly referred to as such by others. The IRA was designated an unlawful terrorist organisation in the United Kingdom and an unlawful organisation in the Republic of Ireland.

Contents

History

A map of the area circa 1650 Triangle1650.jpg
A map of the area circa 1650
The Corn Exchange in 2006. Manchestertriangle.jpg
The Corn Exchange in 2006.


The first Corn Exchange built on this site in 1837 was designed by Richard Lane. This was demolished in 1897 and replaced in two sections between 1897 and 1903. Each section was designed by a different architect [3] Before 1837 it traded from Hanging Ditch. In its heyday, 'The Corn & Produce Exchange', was the gathering spot for thousands of traders from all over the region. This continued until the economic depression of the 1920s and 1930s. Following the Second World War, trade gradually declined and the trading floor fell into disuse.

Richard Lane (architect) English architect

Richard Lane was a distinguished English architect of the early and mid-19th century. Born in London and based in Manchester, he was known in great part for his restrained and austere Greek-inspired classicism. He also designed a few buildings – mainly churches – in the Gothic style. He was also known for masterplanning and designing many of the houses in the exclusive Victoria Park estate.

The building was used briefly by the Royal Exchange Theatre Company from 1976. It also served as a filming location for Granada Television's Brideshead Revisited .

<i>Brideshead Revisited</i> book by Evelyn Waugh

Brideshead Revisited, The Sacred & Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder is a novel by English writer Evelyn Waugh, first published in 1945. It follows, from the 1920s to the early 1940s, the life and romances of the protagonist Charles Ryder, including his friendship with the Flytes, a family of wealthy English Catholics who live in a palatial mansion called Brideshead Castle. Ryder has relationships with two of the Flytes: Sebastian and Julia. The novel explores themes including nostalgia for the age of English aristocracy, Catholicism, and the nearly overt homosexuality of Sebastian Flyte's coterie at Oxford University. A faithful and well-received television adaptation of the novel was produced in an 11-part miniseries by Granada Television in 1981.

From approximately this period until 1996 it became a gathering place for alternative communities and contained a large market with small stallholders selling clothes, jewellery and piercing paraphernalia, and second hand record shops. Many of the shops were temporary structures on the trading floor of the exchange, with other shops operated from permanent units and offices around the perimeter. There was also a small café in a basement area to the northeast of the ground floor. The exterior of the building also housed many shops in a basement area.

After being heavily damaged by the 1996 bomb many of these businesses were forced to move to new premises, mostly in the north of the city, where many foundered. [4] The Corn Exchange was renovated and reopened as the Triangle Shopping Centre (because of its shape). Most of the Edwardian interior was replaced by high-class retail outlets including MUJI, a flagship Adidas store, O'Neill and Jigsaw, all of which have now closed.

Adidas German multinational corporation

Adidas AG is a multinational corporation, founded and headquartered in Herzogenaurach, Germany, that designs and manufactures shoes, clothing and accessories. It is the largest sportswear manufacturer in Europe, and the second largest in the world, after Nike. It is the holding company for the Adidas Group, which consists of the Reebok sportswear company, TaylorMade golf company, Runtastic, an Austrian fitness technology company and 8.33% of German football club Bayern Munich. Adidas' revenue for 2016 was listed at €19.29 billion.

O'Neill is originally a Californian surf wear and surfboard brand started in 1952 by Jack O'Neill. It moved down the coast from San Francisco to Santa Cruz by the end of the decade. Jack is credited to have invented the wetsuit, his son Pat the leash on the surfboard. The company logo symbolizes a breaking surf wave. "O'NEILL" and the "Wave logo" are trademarks registered worldwide.

In 2005, The Norwich Property Trust, the largest authorised commercial property unit trust in the UK, acquired the Triangle for £67m from American property company the Blackstone Group and its UK-based partners Milligan. [5]

The Blackstone Group company

The Blackstone Group L.P. is an American multinational private equity, alternative asset management and financial services firm based in New York City. As the largest alternative investment firm in the world, Blackstone specializes in private equity, credit and hedge fund investment strategies.

In 2012, 'The Triangle' was relaunched as 'Corn Exchange, Manchester'. Plan were revealed to convert the building into a food outlet [6] and a hotel [7] In August 2014 work commenced by a demolition company to strip out modern interior materials and fixtures, some of which were being offered for reuse as salvage and reclamation, prior to recycling or landfill. The food outlet opened in 2015 [8] and a hotel is also planned for the site. [2]

See also

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Corn Exchanges in England

In England, Corn Exchanges are distinct buildings which were originally created as a venue for Corn merchants to meet and arrange pricing with farmers for the sale of wheat, barley and other corn crops. With the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846, a large number of Corn Exchanges were built, particularly in the corn growing areas of Eastern England. However, with the fall in price of English Corn as a result of cheap imports, Corn Exchanges virtually ceased to be built after the 1870s. Increasingly they were put to other uses, particularly as meeting and concert halls. Many found a new lease of life in the early 20th century as cinemas, Following the 2nd World War many could not be maintained and they were demolished. In the 1970s their architectural importance came to be appreciated, and most of the surviving examples are listed buildings. Most of the surviving Corn Exchanges have now been restored and many have become Arts Centres, Theatres or Concert Halls.

References

  1. "Listed buildings". Manchester City Council. Archived from the original (HTTP) on 24 February 2007. Retrieved 29 October 2007.
  2. 1 2 http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/whats-on/whats-on-news/revealed-unseen-manchester-corn-exchange-11642520
  3. Boardman, David. "Corn Exchange". Manchester View. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  4. "Bombed out" (HTTP). Cathy Malcolm film on corn exchange traders following IRA bomb. Retrieved 30 October 2007.
  5. "Triangle sold in £67m deal". Manchester Evening News. 18 October 2005. Retrieved 30 October 2007.
  6. Begum, Shelina (8 August 2013). "The taste of things to come – Manchester's Corn Exchange to be turned into top dining destination". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved 7 July 2014.
  7. Bell, Alex (2 May 2014). "Boutique hotel to open in Corn Exchange as part of £30m redevelopment". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved 7 July 2014.
  8. Sarah Walters (14 September 2015). "Take a look: Wahaca opens at Manchester's Corn Exchange". men.

Coordinates: 53°29′06″N2°14′35″W / 53.48500°N 2.24306°W / 53.48500; -2.24306