Holy Trinity Platt Church

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Holy Trinity Platt Church
Holy Trinity Church, Rusholme
Holy Trinity Platt Church.jpg
Holy Trinity Platt Church from the south
Greater Manchester UK location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Holy Trinity Platt Church
Location in Greater Manchester
Coordinates: 53°27′00″N2°13′32″W / 53.4501°N 2.2255°W / 53.4501; -2.2255
OS grid reference SJ 851,948
LocationPlatt Lane, Rusholme, Manchester
CountryEngland
Denomination Anglican
Churchmanship Evangelical
Website www.plattchurch.org
History
Status Parish church
Dedication Holy Trinity
Consecrated 26 June 1846
Architecture
Functional statusActive
Heritage designationGrade II*
Designated18 December 1963
Architect(s) Edmund Sharpe
Architectural typeChurch
Style Gothic Revival
Groundbreaking 1845
Completed1912
Specifications
Spire height170 feet (52 m)
Materials Terracotta, slate roof
Administration
Parish Holy Trinity at Rusholme
Deanery Hulme
Archdeaconry Manchester
Diocese Manchester
Province York
Clergy
Vicar(s) Rev Steve James
Laity
Reader(s) Peter Capon, David Poole
Isabel Turley
Churchwarden(s) Rob Turley
Richard Lander

Holy Trinity Platt Church (also known as Holy Trinity Church, Rusholme), is in Platt Fields Park in Rusholme, Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Hulme, the archdeaconry of Manchester, and the diocese of Manchester. [1] The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building. [2] It is the second "pot church" designed by Edmund Sharpe, so-called because the main building material used in the construction of the church is terracotta. [3]

Platt Fields Park

Platt Fields Park is a large public park in Fallowfield, Manchester, England which is home to Platt Hall. Fallowfield lies to the south and Wilmslow Road runs along its eastern edge.

Rusholme area of Manchester, England

Rusholme is an inner-city area of Manchester, England, about two miles south of the city centre. The population of Rusholme ward at the 2011 census was 13,643. Rusholme is bounded by the neighbourhoods of Chorlton-on-Medlock to the north, Victoria Park and Longsight to the east, Fallowfield to the south and Moss Side to the west. It has a large student population, with several student halls and many students renting terraced houses, and suburban houses towards the Victoria Park area.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 in 2017; the Greater Manchester Built-up Area is the United Kingdom's second-most populous, with a population of 2.55 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Contents

History

The church was built in 1845–46 to a design by the Lancaster architect Edmund Sharpe. It was built for Thomas Carrill Worsley of Platt Hall. The Worsley family chapel had been Platt Chapel, but this had become a Unitarian chapel early in the 19th century. Thomas Worsley planned to build an Anglican church, but in this he was in competition with a neighbour, a Mr Anson of Birch Hall, to build the first Anglican church in the area. Anson built St James' Church in Danes Road, Rusholme, but Worsley arranged for Holy Trinity to be consecrated before its building was complete. Worsley chose the dedication to the Holy Trinity to show his opposition to the Unitarians. [3] The church cost £4,000 (equivalent to £380,000in 2018) [4] (excluding the stained glass), and when built it could accommodate between 650 and 700 people. [5]

Lancaster, Lancashire county town of Lancashire, England

Lancaster is the county town of Lancashire, England. It is on the River Lune and has a population of 52,234; the wider City of Lancaster local government district has a population of 142,487.

Edmund Sharpe English architect and engineer (1809 – 1877)

Edmund Sharpe was an English architect, architectural historian, railway engineer, and sanitary reformer. Born in Knutsford, Cheshire, he was educated first by his parents and then at schools locally and in Runcorn, Greenwich and Sedbergh. Following his graduation from Cambridge University he was awarded a travelling scholarship, enabling him to study architecture in Germany and southern France. In 1835 he established an architectural practice in Lancaster, initially working on his own. In 1845 he entered into partnership with Edward Paley, one of his pupils. Sharpe's main focus was on churches, and he was a pioneer in the use of terracotta as a structural material in church building, designing what were known as "pot" churches, the first of which was St Stephen and All Martyrs' Church, Lever Bridge.

Unitarianism is a Christian theological movement named for its belief that the God in Christianity is one person, as opposed to the Trinity which in many other branches of Christianity defines God as three persons in one being: the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Unitarian Christians, therefore, believe that Jesus was inspired by God in his moral teachings, and he is a savior, but he was not a deity or God incarnate. Unitarianism does not constitute one single Christian denomination, but rather refers to a collection of both extant and extinct Christian groups, whether historically related to each other or not, which share a common theological concept of the oneness nature of God.

Sharpe's first "pot church" had been St Stephen and All Martyrs' Church, Lever Bridge. The terracotta for the body of this church was supplied, as before, by the Ladyshore Coal and TerraCotta Company, which was owned by Sharpe's brother-in-law, John Fletcher. However, there was a dispute with Fletcher about the costs; Fletcher supplied the terracotta for the body of the church, but the material for the spire was provided by a different manufacturer, Fletcher's brother-in-law, Edmund Peel Willock. [3] [6] The church was consecrated on 26 June 1846 by Rt Revd John Bird Sumner, Bishop of Chester, although the spire was not completed until 1850. [6] The terracotta for the spire proved to be inferior to Fletcher's material, and the spire had to be replaced in 1912. In 1966–67 a church hall was built and attached to the east wall of the church. [3]

St Stephen and All Martyrs Church, Lever Bridge Terracotta church in the United Kingdom

St Stephen and All Martyrs' Church, Lever Bridge, is in Darcy Lever, Bolton, Greater Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Walmsley, the archdeaconry of Bolton, and the diocese of Manchester. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building, and is the first of three "pot churches" designed by Edmund Sharpe, so-called because they are constructed largely of terracotta.

Consecration is the solemn dedication to a special purpose or service, usually religious. The word consecration literally means "association with the sacred". Persons, places, or things can be consecrated, and the term is used in various ways by different groups. The origin of the word comes from the Latin stem consecrat, which means dedicated, devoted, and sacred. A synonym for to consecrate is to sanctify; a distinct antonym is to desecrate.

The Bishop of Chester is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Chester in the Province of York.

Architecture

Exterior

Spire of Holy Trinity Platt Church Church of the Holy Trinity from Plattfields Park.JPG
Spire of Holy Trinity Platt Church

Terracotta is used as the facing material for both the interior and the exterior of the church. [3] It is made to imitate stone, even to the use of masons' marks. The roof is in slate. The architectural style of the church is Decorated. [2] Its plan consists of a five-bay nave with a clerestory, a southwest steeple, north and south aisles, a two-bay chancel, a west porch, and a south porch contained in the tower. [2] [3] The tower is in three stages with angle buttresses and it has a south doorway. Its middle stage contains three-light windows with crocketted gables, above which are paired bell openings. The summit of the tower has an embattled parapet and corner pinnacles. On the tower is a tall octagonal spire supported by flying buttresses. The west window of the church has four lights, and the east window has five lights containing elaborate tracery. [2]

Masons mark symbol often found on dressed stone in buildings

A mason's mark is a symbol often found on dressed stone in buildings and other public structures.

Slate A fine-grained, foliated, homogeneous, weakly metamorphic rock

Slate is a fine-grained, foliated, homogeneous metamorphic rock derived from an original shale-type sedimentary rock composed of clay or volcanic ash through low-grade regional metamorphism. It is the finest grained foliated metamorphic rock. Foliation may not correspond to the original sedimentary layering, but instead is in planes perpendicular to the direction of metamorphic compression.

Bay (architecture) space defined by the vertical piers, in a building

In architecture, a bay is the space between architectural elements, or a recess or compartment. Bay comes from Old French baee, meaning an opening or hole.

Interior

Internally, terracotta is used even for the piers of the arcades. The font is in stone and has an octagonal bowl. The stained glass in the chancel forms a memorial to the Worsley family and dates from 1849–50. In the north aisle is a window dated 1871 with glass made by Lavers, Barraud and Westlake. [3]

Pier (architecture) architectural upright support for a structure or superstructure

A pier, in architecture, is an upright support for a structure or superstructure such as an arch or bridge. Sections of structural walls between openings (bays) can function as piers.

Arcade (architecture) covered walk enclosed by a line of arches on one or both sides

An arcade is a succession of contiguous arches, with each arch supported by columns, piers. Exterior arcades are designed to provide a sheltered walkway for pedestrians. The walkway may be lined with retail stores. An arcade may feature arches on both sides of the walkway. Alternatively, a blind arcade superimposes arcading against a solid wall. Blind arcades are a feature of Romanesque architecture that influenced Gothic architecture. In the Gothic architectural tradition, the arcade can be located in the interior, in the lowest part of the wall of the nave, supporting the triforium and the clerestory in a cathedral, or on the exterior, in which they are usually part of the walkways that surround the courtyard and cloisters.

Baptismal font article of church furniture intended for infant baptism

A baptismal font is an article of church furniture used for baptism.

See also

A sketch published in The Builder, 1845 Holy Trinity Rusholme sketch.jpg
A sketch published in The Builder, 1845
Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M14 postcode area is to the south of the city centre, and contains the areas of Fallowfield, Moss Side, and Rusholme. The postcode area contains 58 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, three are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. Holy Trinity Platt, Manchester, Church of England , retrieved 18 June 2010
  2. 1 2 3 4 Historic England. "Church of Holy Trinity, Platt Lane, Manchester (1246948)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 29 May 2012.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Hartwell, Clare; Hyde, Matthew; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2004), Lancashire: Manchester and the South-East, The Buildings of England, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, pp. 466–468, ISBN   0-300-10583-5
  4. UK Retail Price Index inflation figures are based on data from Clark, Gregory (2017). "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  5. Brandwood, Geoff; Austin, Tim; Hughes, John; Price, James (2012), The Architecture of Sharpe, Paley and Austin, Swindon: English Heritage, pp. 36–37, 213, ISBN   978-1-84802-049-8
  6. 1 2 Hughes, John M. (2010), Edmund Sharpe: Man of Lancaster, John M. Hughes, pp. 258–270