Great Northern Warehouse

Last updated
The Great Northern Warehouse
Great Northern 2461.JPG
General information
Location Manchester, England
Address235 Deansgate, Manchester, M3 4EN
Coordinates 53°28′38″N2°14′57″W / 53.47722°N 2.24917°W / 53.47722; -2.24917 Coordinates: 53°28′38″N2°14′57″W / 53.47722°N 2.24917°W / 53.47722; -2.24917
Current tenants AMC Theatres, Lifestyle Fitness, All Star Lanes, Manchester 235 casino, NCP Manchester Ltd, Breakout Manchester
Construction started1885
Completed1899
Renovated1998
Design and construction
ArchitectA. Ross
Structural engineerW. T. Foxlee
Website
The Great Northern Official Website

The Great Northern Warehouse is the former railway goods warehouse of the Great Northern Railway in Manchester city centre, England, which was refurbished into a leisure complex in 1999. The building is at the junction of Deansgate and Peter Street. It was granted Grade II* listed building status in 1974. [1]

In the final half of the 19th century Manchester's reputation as a financial and commercial centre was boosted by the unprecedented number of warehouses erected in the city centre. In 1806 there were just over 1,000 but by 1815 this had almost doubled to 1,819. Manchester was dubbed "warehouse city". The earliest were built around King Street although by 1850 warehouses had spread to Portland Street and later to Whitworth Street. They are direct descendants of the canal warehouses of Castlefield.

Great Northern Railway (Great Britain) British pre-grouping railway company

The Great Northern Railway (GNR) was a British railway company established by the Great Northern Railway Act of 1846. On 1 January 1923 the company lost its identity, as a constituent of the newly formed London and North Eastern Railway.

Manchester city centre central business district of the City of Manchester, England

Manchester city centre is the central business district of Manchester, England, within the boundaries of Trinity Way, Great Ancoats Street and Whitworth Street. The City Centre ward had a population of 17,861 at the 2011 census.

The warehouse was built to be fireproof with a steel frame on a rectangular plan, 267 feet long by 217 feet wide and five storeys high, with 27 windows on the east and west sides and 17 windows on the north and south ends. All four sides have friezes lettered in white brick reading "Great Northern Railway Company's Goods Warehouse". [1] It was built above the Manchester and Salford Junction Canal, and a dock beneath was constructed to allow goods to be transferred to and from canal barges via shafts and a complex system of haulage using hydraulic power. [2] The building could hold a total of 150 goods wagons across two of its levels, with capacity for a further 500 in its sidings. Its construction effectively wiped out the district of Alport Town, which had included 300 houses, and "Over 800 men were employed on the site. 25 million bricks, 50,000 tons of concrete, 12,000 tons of mild steel and 65 miles of rivets were used in its construction". [3]

Manchester and Salford Junction Canal

The Manchester and Salford Junction Canal was a canal in the city of Manchester. It was originally built to provide a direct waterway between the Mersey and Irwell Navigation and the Rochdale Canal. The canal opened in 1839 and was abandoned in 1922.

Manchester Hydraulic Power

Manchester's Hydraulic Power system was a public hydraulic power network supplying energy across the city of Manchester via a system of high-pressure water pipes from three pumping stations from 1894 until 1972. The system, which provided a cleaner and more compact alternative to steam engines, was used to power workshop machinery, lifts, cranes and a large number of cotton baling presses in warehouses as it was particularly useful for processes that required intermittent power. It was used to wind Manchester Town Hall clock, pump the organ at Manchester Cathedral and raise the safety curtain at Manchester Opera House in Quay Street.

Alport Town was a district of Manchester, England, that included over 300 houses. It was effectively wiped out by the construction of the Great Northern Warehouse and its ancillary buildings and roads in the 1890s. Known by several names over a period of years, including Aldeparc, Aldport, Over Alporde, Nether Alteport, Alporton, Hooperton and Upperton, the area was known as Alport or Alport Town around the time of its demise.

According to Historic England, the warehouse is a "unique survival of a three-way railway goods exchange station, serving the railway, canal and road networks of the Manchester region." [1]

Historic England Executive non-departmental public body of the British Government, tasked with protecting the historical environment of England

Historic England is an executive non-departmental public body of the British Government sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). It is tasked with protecting the historical environment of England by preserving and listing historic buildings, ancient monuments and advising central and local government.

The development includes a cinema, casino, restaurants, bowling alley, bar, gym, and a multi-storey car park.

See also

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M3 postcode area of the city includes the western part of the city centre. The area contains 76 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, five are listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, two are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Related Research Articles

Castlefield human settlement in United Kingdom

Castlefield is an inner city conservation area of Manchester in North West England. The conservation area which bears its name is bounded by the River Irwell, Quay Street, Deansgate and Chester Road. It was the site of the Roman era fort of Mamucium or Mancunium which gave its name to Manchester. It was the terminus of the Bridgewater Canal, the world's first industrial canal, built in 1764; the oldest canal warehouse opened in 1779. The world's first passenger railway terminated here in 1830, at Liverpool Road railway station and the first railway warehouse opened here in 1831.

Manchester Central Convention Complex

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Deansgate railway station railway station

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Deansgate road in Manchester, England

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Manchester Liverpool Road railway station former railway station in Manchester, England

Liverpool Road is a former railway station on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway in Manchester, England that opened on 15 September 1830. The station was the Manchester terminus of the world's first inter-city passenger railway in which all services were hauled by timetabled steam locomotives. It is the world's oldest surviving terminal railway station.

Architecture of Manchester

The architecture of Manchester demonstrates a rich variety of architectural styles. The city is a product of the Industrial Revolution and is known as the first modern, industrial city. Manchester is noted for its warehouses, railway viaducts, cotton mills and canals - remnants of its past when the city produced and traded goods. Manchester has minimal Georgian or medieval architecture to speak of and consequently has a vast array of 19th and early 20th-century architecture styles; examples include Palazzo, Neo-Gothic, Venetian Gothic, Edwardian baroque, Art Nouveau, Art Deco and the Neo-Classical.

Dukinfield Junction

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Brunswick Mill, Ancoats grade II listed mill in Manchester, United kingdom

Brunswick Mill, Ancoats is a former cotton spinning mill in Ancoats, Manchester, England. The mill was built around 1840, part of a group of mills built along the Ashton Canal, and at that time it was one of the country's largest mills. It was built round a quadrangle, a seven-storey block facing the canal. It was taken over by the Lancashire Cotton Corporation in the 1930s and passed to Courtaulds in 1964. Production finished in 1967.

Canal warehouse

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Tootal, Broadhurst and Lee Building, Manchester

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1830 warehouse, Liverpool Road railway station 19th-century warehouse in Manchester, England

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Kearsley Mill Bolton, Greater Manchester, M26

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Swan Lane Mills

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Mather Lane Mill

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Coal Drops Yard

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Historic England, "Deansgate Goods Station and Attached Carriage Ramp (1268529)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 1 October 2012
  2. Hartwell, Clare (2001), Manchester, Pevsner Architectural Guides, London: Penguin, p. 210, ISBN   0-14-071131-7
  3. Parkinson-Bailey, John J. (2000). Manchester: An Architectural History. Manchester University Press. p. 55. ISBN   978-0-71905-606-2.