Greater Manchester Police Museum

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Greater Manchester Police Museum

Greater Manchester Police Museum.jpg

Greater Manchester Police Museum
Established 1981 (1981)
Location 57A Newton Street
Manchester
M1 1ET
England
Coordinates 53°28′57″N2°19′34″W / 53.482444°N 2.32612°W / 53.482444; -2.32612 Coordinates: 53°28′57″N2°19′34″W / 53.482444°N 2.32612°W / 53.482444; -2.32612
Type Police Museum
Website gmpmuseum.co.uk
Helmets and motorcycles on display Inside the Greater Manchester Police Museum & Archives.jpg
Helmets and motorcycles on display

The Greater Manchester Police Museum is a former police station converted into a museum and archives detailing the history of policing in Greater Manchester, England. It was home to Manchester City Police and then its successors Manchester and Salford Police and Greater Manchester Police from 1879 until 1979. [1] [2]

Greater Manchester County of England

Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 2.8 million. It encompasses one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United Kingdom and comprises ten metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan, and the cities of Manchester and Salford. Greater Manchester was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972; and designated a functional city region on 1 April 2011.

The Manchester City Police was, from the early 19th century until 1968, the territorial police force of the city of Manchester, in northern England.

Manchester and Salford Police was a police force in England from 1 June 1968 to 1 April 1974. It was created as a merger of the Manchester City Police and Salford City Police and covered the adjacent county boroughs of Manchester and Salford. It was amalgamated with parts of the Lancashire Constabulary and Cheshire Constabulary under the Local Government Act 1972 to form Greater Manchester Police.

Contents

Upon its conversion to a museum in 1981 the interior was redesigned to reflect its past and now serves as a reminder of Victorian policing. The building was Grade II listed in 1994 as Former Newton Street Police Station. [3]

Location

Located on Newton Street in Manchester's Northern Quarter it is a short walk away from Piccadilly Gardens and Piccadilly railway station.

Northern Quarter (Manchester) area in Manchester, England

The Northern Quarter is an area of Manchester city centre, England, between Piccadilly station, Victoria station and Ancoats, centred on Oldham Street, just off Piccadilly Gardens. It was defined and named in the 1990s as part of the regeneration and gentrification of Manchester.

See also

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References

  1. "Manchester Police Stations and Buildings 1794-1906". Victorian Police Stations. Retrieved 2014-09-01.
  2. "Newton Street Police Station City Centre". Victorian Police Stations. Retrieved 2014-09-01.
  3. "Former Newton Street Police Station". Manchester Gov. Retrieved 2014-07-12.