Brookfield Unitarian Church

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Brookfield Unitarian Church

Brookfield Unitarian Church, Gorton, Manchester, is a Victorian Gothic church built between 1869 and 1871. It was commissioned by Richard Peacock (1820–1889), engineer and Liberal MP for Manchester, and designed by the prolific Manchester architect Thomas Worthington. [1] The church cost Peacock £12,000. It was designated a Grade II* listed building on 3 October 1974. [2] The churchyard lodges and the Sunday School are also listed buildings. The church steeple contains a peal of eight bells, all named after members of the Peacock family.

Gorton area of the city of Manchester, in North West England

Gorton is an area of Manchester in North West England, southeast of the city centre. The population at the 2011 census was 36,055. Neighbouring areas include Audenshaw, Denton, Levenshulme, and Reddish.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 2.8 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Richard Peacock engineer and politician from United Kingdom

Richard Peacock was an English engineer, one of the founders of locomotive manufacturer Beyer-Peacock.

Contents

Pevsner's The Buildings of England describes the church as "very large and strikingly-prosperous looking. Stone, Early English style, with a north-west steeple. The church has a bold, simple, and perfect Ecclesiological interior." [1] The church, and its graveyard, have suffered much from vandalism in recent years.

Nikolaus Pevsner German-born British scholar

Sir Nikolaus Bernhard Leon Pevsner was a German, later British scholar of the history of art, especially of architecture.

Peacock, a partner in the locomotive engineering firm of Beyer, Peacock and Company is buried in the cemetery of the church, along with members of his family, in the Peacock Mausoleum, also by Thomas Worthington.

Beyer, Peacock and Company defunct British locomotive manufacturer, based in Gorton, Manchester

Beyer, Peacock and Company was an English railway locomotive manufacturer with a factory in Gorton, Manchester. Founded by Charles Beyer, Richard Peacock and Henry Robertson, it traded from 1854 until 1966. It received limited liability in 1902, becoming Beyer, Peacock and Company Limited.

Peacock Mausoleum

The Peacock Mausoleum is a Victorian Gothic memorial to Richard Peacock (1820–1889), engineer and Liberal MP for Manchester, and to his son, Joseph Peacock. It is situated in the cemetery of Brookfield Unitarian Church, Gorton, Manchester. The mausoleum was designed by the prolific Manchester architect Thomas Worthington. It was made a Grade II* listed structure on 3 October 1974.

Thomas Worthington (architect) English architect

Thomas Worthington was a 19th-century English architect, particularly associated with public buildings in and around Manchester. Worthington's preferred style was the Gothic Revival.

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 The Buildings of England: Lancashire- Manchester and the South East, page 373
  2. Stuff, Good. "Brookfield Unitarian Church, Gorton North, Manchester". www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk.

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References

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Coordinates: 53°27′36″N2°10′07″W / 53.4599°N 2.1685°W / 53.4599; -2.1685

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