25 St Ann Street

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25 St Ann Street

St Ann's Street, Manchester.jpg

25 St. Ann's Street, Manchester, bank and, to the right, attached manager's house
Type Bank
Location Manchester, England
Coordinates 53°28′55″N2°14′43″W / 53.4819°N 2.2452°W / 53.4819; -2.2452 Coordinates: 53°28′55″N2°14′43″W / 53.4819°N 2.2452°W / 53.4819; -2.2452
Area city centre
Built 1848
Architect John Edgar Gregan
Architectural style(s) Italianate
Governing body Private
Listed Building – Grade II*
Official name: 25, St Ann Street, Manchester
Designated 25 February 1952
Reference no. 457199
Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Location of 25 St Ann Street in Greater Manchester

25 St. Ann Street in Manchester, England, is a Victorian bank with attached manager's house constructed in 1848 for Heywood's Bank by John Edgar Gregan. [1] The bank is "one of the finest palazzo-inspired buildings in the city." . [1] It is a Grade II* listed building as of 25 February 1952. [2]

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous metropolitan area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Victorian architecture series of architectural revival styles

Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era, during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed "Victorian" architecture did not become popular until later in Victoria's reign. The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles. The name represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch. Within this naming and classification scheme, it followed Georgian architecture and later Regency architecture, and was succeeded by Edwardian architecture.

Heywood's Bank was a private banking firm established and run in Manchester by members of the Heywood family of Pendleton between 1788 and 1874.

Contents

The bank is built of sandstone, "beautifully finished", [1] while the manager's house is of more modest red brick. The ground floor is rusticated with the upper floor windows having pediments and balconies. The bank and the manager's house are linked by a single-storey entrance, "an arrangement recalling the Palazzo Pandolfini in Florence." [1]

Rustication (architecture) masonry technique of texturing

In classical architecture rustication is a range of masonry techniques giving visible surfaces a finish that contrasts in texture with the smoothly finished, squared-block masonry surfaces called ashlar. The visible face of each individual block is cut back around the edges to make its size and placing very clear. In addition the central part of the face of each block may be given a deliberately rough or patterned surface.

Florence Comune in Tuscany, Italy

Florence is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,084 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.

See also

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M2 postcode area of the city includes part of the city centre, including the Central Retail District. The postcode area contains 143 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, five are listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, 16 are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Hartwell 2002, p. 201.
  2. Good Stuff (1952-02-25). "25, St Ann Street - Manchester - Manchester - England". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2017-02-17.

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References

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International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

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