Slade Hall

Last updated
Slade Hall
Manchester Slade Hall 1.jpg
Greater Manchester UK location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Location within Greater Manchester
General information
Town or city Manchester
Country England
Coordinates 53°27′02″N2°11′49″W / 53.4506°N 2.1969°W / 53.4506; -2.1969
Completed 1585
Old drawing of Slade Hall showing the east front Manchester Slade Hall 6.jpg
Old drawing of Slade Hall showing the east front

Slade Hall is a small Elizabethan manor house on Slade Lane in Longsight, Manchester, England (grid reference SJ870948 ). An inscription above the porch dates the building to 1585.

Elizabethan era epoch in English history marked by the reign of Queen Elizabeth I

The Elizabethan era is the epoch in the Tudor period of the history of England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603). Historians often depict it as the golden age in English history. The symbol of Britannia was first used in 1572, and often thereafter, to mark the Elizabethan age as a renaissance that inspired national pride through classical ideals, international expansion, and naval triumph over Spain. The historian John Guy (1988) argues that "England was economically healthier, more expansive, and more optimistic under the Tudors" than at any time in a thousand years.

Manor house country house that historically formed the administrative centre of a manor

A manor house was historically the main residence of the lord of the manor. The house formed the administrative centre of a manor in the European feudal system; within its great hall were held the lord's manorial courts, communal meals with manorial tenants and great banquets. The term is today loosely applied to various country houses, frequently dating from the late medieval era, which formerly housed the gentry.

Longsight inner city area of Manchester

Longsight is an inner city area of Manchester, England, about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of the city centre. Historically in Lancashire, it had a population of 15,429 at the 2011 census.

Contents

The mansion is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building, first listed on 25 February 1952. [1]

The National Heritage List for England (NHLE) is Historic England's official list of buildings, monuments, parks and gardens, wrecks, battlefields, World Heritage Sites and other heritage assets considered worthy of preservation. Properties on the list, or located within a conservation area, are protected from being altered or demolished without special permission from local government planning authorities.

History

Slade, known anciently as Milkwall Slade, was an estate made up of 24 acres (9.7 ha) in Rusholme and 20 acres (8.1 ha) in Gorton, both in Manchester, England. From about the mid-13th century until the reign of Elizabeth I, it was held by a family who adopted Slade as their surname. They sold the estate to the Siddall family, who in 1583 began construction of Slade Hall. Work was completed by 1585, as evidenced by an inscription on a beam over the porch, which also has the initials of the builder, E. S., for Edward Siddall. The Siddals and their descendants occupied the house for the next 300 years. [2]

Rusholme area of Manchester, England

Rusholme is an inner-city area of Manchester, England, about two miles south of the city centre. The population of Rusholme ward at the 2011 census was 13,643. Rusholme is bounded by the neighbourhoods of Chorlton-on-Medlock to the north, Victoria Park and Longsight to the east, Fallowfield to the south and Moss Side to the west. It has a large student population, with several student halls and many students renting terraced houses, and suburban houses towards the Victoria Park area.

Gorton area of the city of Manchester, in North West England

Gorton is an area of Manchester in North West England, southeast of the city centre. The population at the 2011 census was 36,055. Neighbouring areas include Audenshaw, Denton, Levenshulme, and Reddish.

Elizabeth I of England Queen regnant of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until 1603

Elizabeth I was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last of the five monarchs of the House of Tudor.

Slade Hall was offered for sale at auction in 2002, and was bought by property developer Mel Evans for £527,000. [3] The hall was converted into flats, [4] and as of 2017 is divided into shared accommodation for 14 residents. [5] It is also the registered office of the Partington Housing Association. [6]

Description

Slade Hall is an Elizabethan timber-framed house on a stone base, built to a hall and cross-wing plan. [lower-alpha 1] There are some brick extensions to the rear, a slate roof, and a 19th-century wing added to the right of the original. It is of two storeys, the upper one jettied. [1]

Elizabethan architecture term given to early Renaissance architecture in England, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I

Elizabethan architecture refers to buildings of aesthetic ambition constructed during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland from 1558–1603. Historically, the era sits between the long era of dominant architectural patronage of ecclesiastical buildings by the Catholic Church which ended abruptly at the Dissolution of the Monasteries from c.1536, and the advent of a court culture of pan-European artistic ambition under James I (1603–25). Stylistically, Elizabethan architecture is notably pluralistic. It came at the end of insular traditions in design and construction called the Perpendicular style in church building, the fenestration, vaulting techniques and open truss designs of which often affected the detail of larger domestic buildings. However, English design had become open to the influence of early printed architectural texts imported to England by ecclesiasts as early as the 1480s. Into the sixteenth century, illustrated continental pattern-books introduced a wide range of architectural examplars, fuelled by the archaeology of classical Rome which inspired myriad printed designs of increasing elaboration and abstraction. As church building turned to the construction of great houses for courtiers and merchants, these novelties accompanied a nostalgia for native history as well as huge divisions in religious identity, plus the influence of continental mercantile and civic buildings. Insular traditions of construction, detail and materials never entirely disappeared. These varied influences on patrons who could favour conservatism or great originality confound attempts to neatly classify Elizabethan architecture. This era of cultural upheaval and fusions corresponds to what is often termed Mannerism and Late Cinquecento in Italy, French Renaissance architecture in France, and the Plateresque style in Spain.

Jettying

Jettying is a building technique used in medieval timber-frame buildings in which an upper floor projects beyond the dimensions of the floor below. This has the advantage of increasing the available space in the building without obstructing the street. Jettied floors are also termed jetties. In the U.S., the most common surviving colonial version of this is the garrison house. Most jetties are external, but some early Medieval houses were built with internal jetties.

The stud-and-rail timber frame has zig-zag herring-bone bracing between the constructional timbers. A porch in the angle between the main gable and the southern wing has painted lozenges resembling quatrefoils. [4] The main hall has two first-floor four-light wooden mullioned casements; the range to the left has a restored fourteen-light mullion and transom window, with a three-light window immediately to its right. The range of the cross-wing on the right has ten-light mullion and transom windows at the ground floor and twelve-lights at the first floor. [1]

Wall stud vertical framing member in a buildings wall of smaller cross section than a post

A wall stud is a vertical framing member in a building's wall of smaller cross section than a post. They are a fundamental element in frame building.

Frame and panel woodworking technique

Frame and panel construction, also called rail and stile, is a woodworking technique often used in the making of doors, wainscoting, and other decorative features for cabinets, furniture, and homes. The basic idea is to capture a 'floating' panel within a sturdy frame, as opposed to techniques used in making a slab solid wood cabinet door or drawer front, the door is constructed of several solid wood pieces running in a vertical or horizontal direction with exposed endgrains. Usually, the panel is not glued to the frame but is left to 'float' within it so that seasonal movement of the wood comprising the panel does not distort the frame.

A lozenge (), often referred to as a diamond, is a form of rhombus. The definition of lozenge is not strictly fixed, and it is sometimes used simply as a synonym for rhombus. Most often, though, lozenge refers to a thin rhombus—a rhombus with two acute and two obtuse angles, especially one with acute angles of 45°. The lozenge shape is often used in parquetry and as decoration on ceramics, silverware and textiles. It also features in heraldry and playing cards.

The interior has some exposed timber work showing the house's original construction. Plaster friezes are still visible in the first-floor chamber above the hall, [4] described by architectural historian Norman Redhead as crude 16th-century stuff. They depict mainly heraldic motifs, including the Elizabethan coat of arms and the Siddall family's crest, but also an "entertaining" hunting scene. [8]

See also

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References

Notes

  1. A cross-wing describes a "Wing attached to the hall-range of a medieval house, its axis at right angles to the hall-range, and often gabled." [7]

Citations

  1. 1 2 3 Historic England, "Slade Hall (1254632)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 15 November 2017
  2. Farrer, William; Brownhill, J. (eds.). "Townships: Rusholme". A History of the County of Lancaster. British History Online. 4. pp. 303–309. Retrieved 15 November 2017.
  3. "Historic hall for sale". Manchester Evening News. 21 September 2005. Retrieved 29 April 2017.
  4. 1 2 3 Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 369.
  5. "Slade Hall's Annex - Happy Hippies wanted :)". SpareRoom. Archived from the original on 3 March 2014. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  6. "Partington Housing Association Limited Manchester". BizStats. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  7. Curl, James Stevens (2006). "Cross-wing". A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (online ed.). Oxford University Press. ISBN   978-0-19-172648-4 . Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  8. Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 35.

Bibliography