Church of St George, Chester Road, Hulme

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Church of St George

Benkid77 St George's Church, Manchester 250709.JPG

Church of St George, Chester Road, Hulme
Basic information
Location Chester Road, Hulme, Manchester
Geographic coordinates 53°28′20″N2°15′33″W / 53.4721°N 2.2593°W / 53.4721; -2.2593 Coordinates: 53°28′20″N2°15′33″W / 53.4721°N 2.2593°W / 53.4721; -2.2593
Architectural description
Architect(s) Francis Goodwin
Groundbreaking 1826
Completed 1828
Construction cost £15,000

The Church of St George, Chester Road, Hulme, Manchester, is an early Gothic Revival church by Francis Goodwin, built in 1826-8. It was restored in 1884 by J. S. Crowther. It was designated a Grade II* listed building on 3 October 1974. [1]

Hulme area of Manchester

Hulme is an inner city area and electoral ward of Manchester, England, immediately south of Manchester city centre. It has a significant industrial heritage.

Francis Goodwin was an English architect.

Victorian restoration movement to refurbish and rebuild Church of England churches and cathedrals

The Victorian restoration was the widespread and extensive refurbishment and rebuilding of Church of England churches and cathedrals that took place in England and Wales during the 19th-century reign of Queen Victoria. It was not the same process as is understood today by the term building restoration.

The church was a Commissioners' church, (built to celebrate the victory at the Battle of Waterloo) who allotted the sum of £15,000 for construction. Goodwin was an obvious choice for architect having already undertaken a number of churches in the Midlands and the North West, as well as the original Manchester Town Hall. Sir Nikolaus Pevsner considers that Goodwin's inspiration was Nicholas Hawksmoor's St Michael, Cornhill and that "the whole makes a lively and memorable picture". A six-bay nave with "high three-light Perpendicular windows" concludes with a tall tower at the west end, and two high pinnacles at the east. Porches are set at the northwest and southwest corners. [2]

Commissioners church type of Anglican church

A Commissioners' church, also known as a Waterloo church and Million Act church, is an Anglican church in the United Kingdom built with money voted by Parliament as a result of the Church Building Acts of 1818 and 1824. The 1818 Act supplied a grant of money and established the Church Building Commission to direct its use, and in 1824 made a further grant of money. In addition to paying for the building of churches, the Commission had powers to divide and subdivide parishes, and to provide endowments. The Commission continued to function as a separate body until the end of 1856, when it was absorbed into the Ecclesiastical Commission. In some cases the Commissioners provided the full cost of the new church; in other cases they provided a partial grant and the balance was raised locally. In total 612 new churches were provided, mainly in expanding industrial towns and cities.

Manchester Town Hall municipal building in Manchester, England

Manchester Town Hall is a Victorian, Neo-gothic municipal building in Manchester, England. It is the ceremonial headquarters of Manchester City Council and houses a number of local government departments. The building faces Albert Square to the north and St Peter's Square to the south, with Manchester Cenotaph facing its southern entrance.

Nicholas Hawksmoor was an English architect. He was a leading figure of the English Baroque style of architecture in the late-seventeenth and early-eighteenth centuries. Hawksmoor worked alongside the principal architects of the time, Christopher Wren and John Vanbrugh, and contributed to the design of some of the most notable buildings of the period, including St Paul's Cathedral, Wren's City of London churches, Blenheim Palace and Castle Howard. Part of his work has been correctly attributed to him only relatively recently, and his influence has reached several poets and authors of the twentieth century.

Drawing from Pevsner, the English Heritage inspectors who listed the building in 1974, without an internal inspection, stated that the interior was "reported as having: galleries; Perpendicular arcades; [and a] wall monument to The Hon. George Berkeley Molyneux (d.1841), by Edward Physick, in form of soldier mourning beside urn." [1]

English Heritage charity responsible for the National Heritage Collection of England


English Heritage is a charity that manages over 400 historic monuments, buildings and places. These include prehistoric sites, medieval castles, Roman forts and country houses. The charity states that it uses these properties to ‘bring the story of England to life for over 10 million people each year’.

A declining inner-city population in the post-war period, combined with the increasing isolation of the church caused by major road construction in its vicinity, led to St George's closure in 1984. [3] The last Rector Revd Derek Seber worked with Brian Redhead to try to find a long term use for the building including as a museum for Rolls Royce and as a Museum of Sport . The transformation into such was planned under the then governments Community Programme offering skill training in conservation and building skills. A change in policy brought this initiative to an end. There followed a "twenty-year search for a use which would preserve the interior ... proved fruitless and the building was converted to flats (in) 2000–2. The interior can no longer be read as a whole." [2] In 2015, the flat occupying the church tower was on the market for £1 million. [4]

See also

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M15 postcode area is to the southwest of the centre of the city and includes the areas of Hulme, and parts of Moss Side and Chorlton-on-Medlock. The postcode area contains 33 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, two are listed at Grade II*, the middle grade of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Related Research Articles

John Oldrid Scott was an English architect.

Ewan Christian British architect

Ewan Christian (1814–95) was a British architect. He is most notable for the restorations of Southwell Minster and Carlisle Cathedral, and the design of the National Portrait Gallery. He was Architect to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners from 1851 to 1895. Christian was elected A RIBA in 1840, FRIBA in 1850, RIBA President 1884–86 and was awarded the Royal Gold Medal in 1887.

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Eccles Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Mary the Virgin's Church is an active Anglican parish church in Eccles, Greater Manchester, England. The church is in the Eccles deanery, the archdeaconry of Salford and the diocese of Manchester. Together with St Andrew's Eccles, St Paul's, Monton, Christ Church, Patricroft and St James', Hope the church is part of the team benefice of Eccles. The church was granted Grade I Listed status in 1964.

St Philips Church, Alderley Edge Church in Cheshire, England

St Philip's Church is in the village of Alderley Edge, Cheshire, England. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building. It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Chester, the archdeaconry of Macclesfield and the deanery of Knutsford. The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner described it as "large, ambitious, and unmistakably prosperous-looking".

St Mary the Virgins Church, Leigh Church in Greater Manchester, England

The Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin is a Church of England parish church in Leigh, Greater Manchester, England. It is a member of the Leigh deanery in the archdeaconry of Salford, diocese of Manchester. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

Church of St Wilfrid, Northenden Church in Greater Manchester, England

The Church of St Wilfrid in Ford Lane, Northenden, Manchester, England, is an Anglican church of late medieval origins which was substantially re-built in the 19th century by J. S. Crowther. The church was designated a Grade II* listed building on 25 February 1952.

Church of St Michael and All Angels, Northenden Church in Manchester, United Kingdom

The Church of St Michael and All Angels, Orton Road, Lawton Moor, Northenden, Manchester, is an Anglican church of 1935-7 by N.F.Cachemaille-Day. Pevsner describes the church as "sensational for its country and its time". The church was designated a Grade II* listed building on 16 January 1981.

Church of St Mary, Hulme church in Manchester, UK

The Church of St Mary, Upper Moss Lane, Hulme, Manchester, is a Gothic Revival former church by J. S. Crowther built in 1853–58. It was designated a Grade II* listed building on 3 October 1974.

Christ Church, Moss Side, Manchester Church in Manchester, United Kingdom

Christ Church in Lloyd Street North, Moss Side, Manchester, England, is an Anglican church of 1899–1904 by W. Cecil Hardisty. It was designated a Grade II* listed building on 24 April 1987.

Church of St Peter, Blackley Church in Greater Manchester, England

The Church of St Peter in Old Market Street, Blackley, Manchester, England, is a Gothic Revival church of 1844 by E. H. Shellard. It was a Commissioners' church erected at a cost of £3162. The church is particularly notable for an almost completely intact interior. It was designated a Grade II* listed building on 20 June 1988.

St Peters Church, Westleigh, Greater Manchester Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Peter's Church is in Firs Lane, Westleigh, a district of Leigh, Greater Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Leigh, the archdeaconry of Salford, and the diocese of Manchester. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building. It was designed by the Lancaster architects Paley and Austin. The architectural historians Pollard and Pevsner describe it as "one of their most radical and thrilling churches".

St Peters Church, Ashton-under-Lyne Church in Greater Manchester, UK

St Peter's Church is in Manchester Road, Ashton-under-Lyne, Greater Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Ashton-under-Lyne, the archdeaconry of Rochdale, and the diocese of Manchester.

St James Church, Oldham Church in Greater Manchester, England

St James' Church is in Barry Street, Greenacres Moor, Oldham, Greater Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Oldham East, the archdeaconry of Rochdale, and the diocese of Manchester. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. It was a Commissioners' church, having received a grant towards its construction from the Church Building Commission.

Joseph Stretch Crowther was an English architect who practised in Manchester.

St Thomas Church, Pendleton Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Thomas' Church is on Broad Street, Pendleton, Salford, Greater Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Salford, the archdeaconry of Salford, and the diocese of Manchester. Its benefice is united with those of five nearby churches to form the Salford All Saints Team Ministry. The church is designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed building. It was a Commissioners' church, having received a grant towards its construction from the Church Building Commission.

St Michaels Church, Middleton Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Michael's Church is in Townley Street, Middleton, Greater Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Heywood and Middleton, the archdeaconry of Rochdale, and the diocese of Manchester. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Grade I listed churches in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England. It was created by the Local Government Act 1972, and consists of the metropolitan boroughs of Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan and the cities of Manchester and Salford. This is a complete list of the Grade I listed churches in the metropolitan county as recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Buildings are listed by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport on the recommendation of English Heritage. Grade I listed buildings are defined as being of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; only 2.5 per cent of listed buildings are included in this grade.

Grade I listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 48 Grade I listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade I structures are those considered to be "buildings of exceptional interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with Historic England, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M16 postcode area is to the south of the city centre, and contains the area of Whalley Range. The postcode area contains 12 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

References

  1. 1 2 Historic England, "Church of St George, Manchester (1208640)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 29 August 2012
  2. 1 2 Hartwell, Clare; Hyde, Matthew; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2004). Lancashire: Manchester and the South East. The Buildings of England. New Haven, CT; London: Yale University Press. p. 451. ISBN   0-300-10583-5.
  3. "St. George's Church – Hulme". A Manchester View. Retrieved 29 August 2012.
  4. "Dream Home: The £1m nine-floor flat in former Castlefield church which overlooks Manchester city centre". Manchester Evening News. 4 July 2015. Retrieved 4 July 2015.