1 New York Street

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1 New York Street
One New York Street.JPG
General information
Architectural style Modernist
Town or city Manchester
Country United Kingdom
Construction started 2007
Completed 2009
Cost £25 million [1]
Client Bruntwood
Height 55 metres
Technical details
Floor count 15
Design and construction
Architect Denton Corker Marshall
Main contractor Robert MacAlpine
References
[2]

1 New York Street is a high rise office building in Manchester, England. Designed by Denton Corker Marshall, the building is situated on Mosley Street opposite 38 and 42 Mosley Street. The building opened in 2009 with Bank of New York Mellon as its main tenant.

Denton Corker Marshall is an international architecture practice established in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia in 1972. It was founded by architects John Denton, Bill Corker, and Barrie Marshall. While Melbourne remains the design base, the firm has additional practices in London, Manchester and Jakarta with over 510 projects in 37 different countries.

Mosley Street

Mosley Street is a street in Manchester, England. It runs between its junction with Piccadilly Gardens and Market Street to St Peter's Square. Beyond St Peter's Square it becomes Lower Mosley Street. It is the location of several Grade II and Grade II* listed buildings.

38 and 42 Mosley Street

38 and 42 Mosley Street in Manchester, England, is a double-block Victorian bank constructed between 1862 and c. 1880 for the Manchester and Salford Bank. It was occupied in 2001 by the Royal Bank of Scotland. The original block of 1862 was the "last great work" of Edward Walters, and the extension of the 1880s was by his successors Barker and Ellis. It is a Grade II* listed building.

Architecture

The design consists of two glass and metal ‘boxes’ that appear to jut out of the main building, while the building facade consists of a glass and aluminium cladding to present a strong urban form and distinctive character. The city centre location of the 1 New York Street site presented a number of challenges due to adjacent tram lines in the road and tunnels underneath the building. To minimise disturbance to both the tram lines and the surrounding area, the existing basement structure has been used in conjunction with new pile foundations. 1 New York Street is the first speculative building in central Manchester to be awarded a BREEAM ‘excellent’ rating. [3]

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References

  1. "Manchesters New York Corker". skyscrapercity.com. 30 October 2007. Retrieved 2012-09-12.
  2. "1 New York Street". skyscrapernews.com. 12 November 2010. Retrieved 2012-09-12.
  3. "1 New York Street". Buro Happold. Retrieved 2012-09-12.

Coordinates: 53°28′49″N2°14′22″W / 53.480281°N 2.239524°W / 53.480281; -2.239524

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.