Redfern Building

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The Redfern Building. Redfern Building, Manchester.jpg
The Redfern Building.

Redfern Building in Manchester, England, is a Grade-II listed building which was completed in 1936. The building is situated on Dantzic Street and meets the junction of Mayes Street and Hanover Street. Redfern was originally built for office and warehouse use. [1]

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Redfern was built for the Co-operative Wholesale Society and is now part of the Co-operative Estate in Manchester which includes a number of listed 20th century buildings such as the CIS Tower and Hanover Building. The building bears resemblance to the prominent 1930s art deco movement and is inspired by Dutch Brick modernism according to Nikolaus Pevsner. [2] Redfern was designed by W. A. Johnson and J. W. Cooper.

CIS Tower skyscraper on Miller Street in Manchester, England

The CIS Tower is an office skyscraper on Miller Street in Manchester, England. It was completed in 1962 and rises to 387 feet in height. The Grade II listed building, which houses the Co-operative Banking Group, is Manchester's third-tallest building and the tallest office building in the United Kingdom outside London. The tower remained as built for over 40 years until maintenance issues on the service tower required an extensive renovation which included covering its facade in photovoltaic panels.

Hanover Building grade II listed architectural structure in Manchester, United kingdom

Hanover Building is an Grade II office building in the NOMA district of Manchester, United Kingdom.

Nikolaus Pevsner German-born British scholar

Sir Nikolaus Bernhard Leon Pevsner was a German, later British scholar of the history of art, especially of architecture.

The seven-storey building has a flat roof and consists of pale brown brick. A noticeable service tower exists to the north of the building. Architecture critic Clare Hartwell writes, "It is a pity that this [building] does not enjoy a better site - its impact is partly lost due to its towering neighbours and its relationship with the adjoining Holyoake House." [3]

Since April 2017, Redfern has housed PLANT, an open design studio and workshop for Manchester.

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References

  1. "Redfern CWS Building" . Retrieved 2012-09-25.
  2. Hartwell, Clare (2001). Pevsner Architecture Guides - Manchester. p. 241.
  3. Hartwell, Clare (2001), p. 242.

Coordinates: 53°29′12″N2°14′21″W / 53.4868°N 2.2392°W / 53.4868; -2.2392

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.