Gateway House, Manchester

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Gateway House
Gateway House wavy facade.jpg
Gateway House and Piccadilly Station approach pictured in 2011 before the 2017 refurbishment
Alternative namesPiccadilly House
General information
Architectural styleModernist
LocationManchester, England
Current tenantsempty
Completed1969
Renovated2017
OwnerRealty Estates
Height36 m (118 ft)
Technical details
Floor count9
Floor area12,861 m2 (138,430 sq ft)
Design and construction
Architect Richard Seifert
References
[1]

Gateway House in Manchester, England, is a modernist office block above a row of shops designed by Richard Seifert & Partners and completed in 1969. It replaced a row of 19th-century railway warehouses on the approach to Manchester Piccadilly station. The building, which differed from much of Seifert's contemporary work in that it departed from the bare concrete brutalist style which had become his trademark, was nicknamed the "lazy S" and was reputedly designed as a doodle.

It is considered to be one of Siefert's most loveable buildings, [2] commanding respect from Clare Hartwell, who described it as

Future

The building was bought by Realty Estates in 2008. [4] Hodder + Partners won a competition to redevelop Gateway House in 2009. The plans are for the landmark structure to be converted into a hotel at a cost of £20 million. An office block with ground floor retail space on Ducie Street and a gym behind the Seifert building would be the second phase of the development. [5] In December 2011, the £35 million redevelopment scheme by Hodder + Partners for Realty Estates, was given planning approval by Manchester City Council.

Despite planning approval, redevelopment has not started. In June 2014, the building was sold to international property group, LaSalle for £26m. [6] A new let was agreed with Waitrose and work could begin on renovating the building with a new hotel operator. [7]

A major redevelopment of the neighbouring Piccadilly Station and the surrounding area has been proposed to complement the planned construction of the High Speed 2 (HS2) railway line to Manchester. The project would involve the construction of a large new canopy over the HS2 platforms and the creation of a new entrance to the station. [8] [9] As part of the HS2 redevelopment plans it is likely that Gateway House will be demolished. [10]

Refurbishment commenced in October 2015 and was completed in early 2017.

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References

Notes

  1. Gateway House, skyscrapernews.com, retrieved 29 November 2011
  2. Gateway House, Manchester Modernist Society, archived from the original on 8 February 2013, retrieved 12 September 2012
  3. Hartwell 2001, p. 217
  4. "Plans put forward for £35m revamp of Gateway House". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved 29 November 2011.
  5. Hodder bags planning for £35million overhaul of Seifert's Gateway House, Architects Journal, retrieved 12 September 2012
  6. "Tishbi sells Gateway House for £26m". Place North West. 27 June 2014. Retrieved 2014-10-24.
  7. "Aparthotel secured for Gateway House". Place North West. 15 September 2014. Retrieved 2014-10-24.
  8. "Mayfield SRF" (PDF). Bennetts Associates. 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 21 March 2015.
  9. "Portfolio: HS2 Manchester Strategic Regeneration Framework". Bennetts Associates. Retrieved 22 March 2015.
  10. Charlotte Cox, Charlotte (3 January 2014). "Manchester politicians dismiss claims Piccadilly Station's 'Lazy S' building is 'iconic' in row about its potential demolition". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved 22 March 2015.

Bibliography


Coordinates: 53°28′42″N2°13′55″W / 53.4784564°N 2.2318447°W / 53.4784564; -2.2318447