Church of St John the Evangelist, Cheetham Hill

Last updated

Church of St John the Evangelist, Cheetham
St John's Church, Cheetham (2).jpg
St John's from the southwest
Greater Manchester UK location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Church of St John the Evangelist, Cheetham
Location in Greater Manchester
Coordinates: 53°30′18″N2°14′33″W / 53.5051°N 2.2426°W / 53.5051; -2.2426
OS grid reference SD 840,010
LocationWaterloo Road, Cheetham Hill, Manchester
CountryEngland
Denomination Anglican
Website St John the Evangelist, Cheetham
History
Status Parish church
Dedication Saint John the Evangelist
Architecture
Functional statusActive
Heritage designationGrade II*
Designated3 October 1974
Architect(s) Paley and Austin
Architectural typeChurch
Style Norman Revival,
Gothic Revival
Groundbreaking 1869
Completed1871
Construction cost£10,000 (estimated)
Specifications
Materials Sandstone, tiled roofs
Administration
Parish St John the Evangelist, Cheetham
Deanery North Manchester
Archdeaconry Manchester
Diocese Manchester
Province York
Clergy
Vicar(s) Revd Daniel J. A. Burton

The Church of St John the Evangelist is in Waterloo Road, Cheetham Hill, Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of North Manchester, the archdeaconry of Manchester, and the diocese of Manchester. [1] The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building. [2]

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a major city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. The Greater Manchester Built-up Area is the United Kingdom's second-most populous, with a population of 2.55 million. The city's metropolitan area is the second largest in the United Kingdom, after London, with a population of over 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council. Manchester is a major international centre of tourism, commerce and industrial heritage. Manchester is frequently referred to as the United Kingdom's second city.

Parish church church which acts as the religious centre of a parish

A parish church in Christianity is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish. In many parts of the world, especially in rural areas, the parish church may play a significant role in community activities, often allowing its premises to be used for non-religious community events. The church building reflects this status, and there is considerable variety in the size and style of parish churches. Many villages in Europe have churches that date back to the Middle Ages, but all periods of architecture are represented.

Anglican Diocese of Manchester Church of England diocese in the Province of York, England

The Diocese of Manchester is a Church of England diocese in the Province of York, England. Based in the city of Manchester, the diocese covers much of the county of Greater Manchester and small areas of the counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.

Contents

History

The church was built between 1869 and 1871, and designed by the Lancaster architects Paley and Austin. Its estimated cost was £10,000 (equivalent to £910,000 in 2018), [3] and was paid for by Lewis Loyd, a member of the banking house of Jones Loyd and Company of London. As originally built, the church seated 600 people. [4] The west porch was added in 1894. [5]

Lancaster, Lancashire county town of Lancashire, England

Lancaster is the county town of Lancashire, England. It is on the River Lune and has a population of 52,234; the wider City of Lancaster local government district has a population of 138,375.

Architecture

Exterior

St John's is constructed in sandstone with tiled roofs. Its architectural style is a combination of Romanesque and Early English. The plan consists of a three-bay nave and a two-bay apsidal chancel, with no structural division between them, north and south aisles, a west porch, and a southwest tower. The tower is in four stages with clasping pilasters at the corners rising to pinnacles with pyramidal roofs; the tower itself also has a large pyramidal roof. In the bottom stage is a round-headed south doorway, and in the next stage is a single-light west window. The third stage contains blank arcading with two central lancet windows on each side, and the top stage has coupled and louvred bell openings. At the west end of the nave is a two-bay porch containing a double doorway flanked by large buttresses. Over the porch are three lancet windows, with a multifoil window above them. Most of the windows in the body of the church are lancets. [2] [5]

Sandstone A clastic sedimentary rock composed mostly of sand-sized particles

Sandstone is a clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized mineral particles or rock fragments.

Romanesque architecture architectural style of Medieval Europe

Romanesque architecture is an architectural style of medieval Europe characterized by semi-circular arches. There is no consensus for the beginning date of the Romanesque style, with proposals ranging from the 6th to the 11th century, this later date being the most commonly held. In the 12th century it developed into the Gothic style, marked by pointed arches. Examples of Romanesque architecture can be found across the continent, making it the first pan-European architectural style since Imperial Roman architecture. The Romanesque style in England is traditionally referred to as Norman architecture.

Bay (architecture) space defined by the vertical piers, in a building

In architecture, a bay is the space between architectural elements, or a recess or compartment. Bay comes from Old French baee, meaning an opening or hole.

Interior

The interior of the church is lined in bricks with stone dressings. The piers of the north arcade have a quatrefoil plan, and those of the south arcade are octagonal. At the east end of the north aisle is the organ loft, and there is a chapel at the east end of the south aisle. [5] The wooden pulpit is carved with sunflowers and leaves, anticipating motifs used by Art Nouveau. [6] The large sculpted reredos was installed in 1879. Also in the apse are mosaic panels, and the chancel is floored with encaustic tiles. [2] The stained glass includes windows by C. E. Kempe with depictions of saints, leaders of the church and Sir Philip Sidney. [5] The three-manual pipe organ was made by Hill and Son, and rebuilt in 1895 by A. Young. [7]

Pier (architecture) architectural upright support for a structure or superstructure

A pier, in architecture, is an upright support for a structure or superstructure such as an arch or bridge. Sections of structural walls between openings (bays) can function as piers.

Quatrefoil artistic representation of four circular leaf shapes used in architecture

A quatrefoil is a decorative element consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially overlapping circles of the same diameter. It is found in art, architecture, heraldry and traditional Christian symbolism. The word quatrefoil means "four leaves", from Latin quattuor, four, plus folium, a leaf, referring specifically to a four-leafed clover, but applies in general to four-lobed shapes in various contexts. In recent years, a number of luxury brands have asserted copyright claims related to the symbol.

Pulpit speakers stand in a church

Pulpit is a raised stand for preachers in a Christian church. The origin of the word is the Latin pulpitum. The traditional pulpit is raised well above the surrounding floor for audibility and visibility, accessed by steps, with sides coming to about waist height. From the late medieval period onwards, pulpits have often had a canopy known as the sounding board or abat-voix above and sometimes also behind the speaker, normally in wood. Though sometimes highly decorated, this is not purely decorative, but can have a useful acoustic effect in projecting the preacher's voice to the congregation below. Most pulpits have one or more book-stands for the preacher to rest his or her bible, notes or texts upon.

See also

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M8 postcode area is to the north of the city centre, and contains the districts of Cheetham Hill and Crumpsall. This postcode area contains 20 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, two are listed at Grade II*, the middle of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area is residential, and the listed buildings include churches and associated structures, houses, former civic buildings, two museums, a bandstand, a park shelter, a former billiard hall, and a war memorial.

Related Research Articles

St Cross Church, Knutsford Church in Cheshire, England

St Cross Church is in the town of Knutsford, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building, in the deanery of Knutsford, the archdeaconry of Macclesfield, and the diocese of Chester. It is an active Anglican parish church, with two services every Sunday, a midweek Eucharist each Wednesday, and Morning Prayer most weekdays. The Parish Electoral Roll is 140, and about sixty people attend Sunday morning services.

St Pauls Church, Scotforth Church in Lancashire, England

St Paul's Church is in Scotforth, a suburb of Lancaster, Lancashire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Lancaster, the archdeaconry of Lancaster and Morecambe, and the diocese of Blackburn. The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner described it as a "strange building" and "an anachronism, almost beyond belief".

St John the Baptists Church, Pilling Church in Lancashire, England

St John the Baptist's Church is in the village of Pilling, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Garstang, the archdeaconry of Lancaster and the diocese of Blackburn. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building. Its benefice is combined with those of St James, Stalmine, and St Mark, Eagland Hill. It is described as "a fine example of the late Gothic Revival church with much originality in detail".

St Cuthberts Church, Lytham Church in Lytham, Lancashire

St Cuthbert's is an Anglican church in Lytham, Lancashire, England. It was built 1834–1835, replacing a previous church on the same site. It is an active parish church in the Diocese of Blackburn. Since 1971 it has been designated a Grade II* listed building.

St James the Great Church, Wrightington Church in Lancashire, England

St James the Great Church is in Church Lane, to the west of Wrightington in Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Chorley, the archdeaconry of Blackburn, and the diocese of Blackburn. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

St Pauls Church, Brookhouse Church in Lancashire, England

St Paul's Church is in the village of Brookhouse, Caton-with-Littledale, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Tunstall, the archdeaconry of Lancaster, and the diocese of Blackburn. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

St Margarets Church, Burnage Church in Manchester, England

St Margaret's Church is in Burnage Lane, Burnage, a neighbourhood of Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Heaton, the archdeaconry of Manchester, and the diocese of Manchester. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a Grade II listed building, having been designated on 9 February 2012.

St Johns Minster, Preston Church in Lancashire, England

St John's Minster, formerly the Church of St John the Evangelist, is in Church Street, in the centre of Preston, Lancashire, England. From its origin it has been the parish church of Preston. It is an active Anglican church in the deanery of Preston, the archdeaconry of Lancaster and the diocese of Blackburn. Its benefice is united with that of St George, Preston. St John's is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

St Michael and All Angels Church, Howe Bridge Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Michael and All Angels' Church is in Leigh Road, Howe Bridge, a suburb of Atherton, Greater Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Leigh, the archdeaconry of Salford and the diocese of Manchester. Its benefice is united with those of three local churches, St John the Baptist, St George and St Philip, forming a team ministry entitled the United Benefice of Atherton and Hindsford with Howe Bridge. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

St Peters Church, Leck Church in Lancashire, England

St Peter's Church is in the village of Leck, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Tunstall, the archdeaconry of Lancaster and the diocese of Blackburn. Its benefice is united with those of St Wilfrid, Melling, St John the Baptist, Tunstall, St James the Less, Tatham, the Good Shepherd, Lowgill, and Holy Trinity, Wray, to form the benefice of East Lonsdale. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

St Marys Church, Windermere Church in Cumbria, England

St Mary's Church is in the town of Windermere, Cumbria, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Windermere, the archdeaconry of Westmorland and Furness, and the diocese of Carlisle. Its benefice is united with that of Jesus Church, Troutbeck. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

St Michael and All Angels Church, Ashton-on-Ribble Church in Lancashire, England

St Michael and All Angels Church is in Egerton Road, Ashton-on-Ribble, Preston, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Preston, the archdeaconry of Lancaster, and the diocese of Blackburn. Its benefice is united with those of St Mark, Preston, and St Andrew, Ashton-on-Ribble, to form the benefice of the West Preston Team. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

St Johns Church, Rawtenstall Church in Lancashire, England

St John's Church is a redundant Anglican church in Newchurch Road, Cloughfold, Rawtenstall, Lancashire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

St Matthews Church, Wigan Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Matthew's Church is in Billinge Road, Highfield, Pemberton, Wigan, Greater Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Wigan, the archdeaconry of Wigan & West Lancashire, and the diocese of Liverpool. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

St Silas Church, Blackburn Church in Lancashire, England

St Silas' Church is in Preston New Road, Blackburn, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Blackburn with Darwen, the archdeaconry of Blackburn, and the diocese of Blackburn. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

St Mary Magdalenes Church, Alsager Church in Cheshire, England

St Mary Magdalene's Church is in Crewe Road, Alsager, Cheshire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Congleton, the archdeaconry of Macclesfield, and the diocese of Chester. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

St Michaels Church, Middleton Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Michael's Church is in Townley Street, Middleton, Greater Manchester, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Heywood and Middleton, the archdeaconry of Rochdale, and the diocese of Manchester. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

All Saints Church, Barnacre Church in Lancashire , England

All Saints Church is in Delph Lane, Barnacre-with-Bonds, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Garstang, the archdeaconry of Lancaster, and the diocese of Blackburn. Its benefice is united with those of St Peter, Scorton, and St John the Evangelist, Calder Vale. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

St Johns Church, Ellel Church in Lancashire, England

St John's Church is in Church Lane, Ellel, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Lancaster and Morecambe, the archdeaconry of Lancaster, and the diocese of Blackburn. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. The authors of the Buildings of England series describe the appearance of the church as being "decidedly monumental".

St Wilfrid and St Anns Church, Newton Heath Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Wilfrid and St Ann's Church is in Oldham Road, Newton Heath, Greater Manchester, England. It is a redundant Anglican parish church, which is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

References

Citations

  1. St John the Evangelist, Cheetham, Church of England, archived from the original on 4 November 2012, retrieved 16 June 2012
  2. 1 2 3 Historic England, "Church of St John the Evangelist, Cheetham (1254832)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 16 June 2012
  3. UK Retail Price Index inflation figures are based on data from Clark, Gregory (2017). "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  4. Brandwood et al. 2012, pp. 93–94, 224.
  5. 1 2 3 4 Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner 2004, p. 388.
  6. Brandwood et al. 2012, p. 94.
  7. Lancashire (Manchester, Greater), Cheetham Hill, St. John the Evangelist (N02154), British Institute of Organ Studies , retrieved 16 June 2012

Sources

English Heritage charity responsible for the National Heritage Collection of England

English Heritage is a charity that manages over 400 historic monuments, buildings and places. These include prehistoric sites, medieval castles, Roman forts and country houses. The charity states that it uses these properties to ‘bring the story of England to life for over 10 million people each year’.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.