Grade I listed buildings in Greater Manchester

Last updated

The metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, divided into ten metropolitan boroughs Greater Manchester County (3).png
The metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, divided into ten metropolitan boroughs
Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap  
Download coordinates as: KML  ·  GPX

There are 48 Grade I listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade I structures are those considered to be "buildings of exceptional interest". [1] In England, the authority for listing under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 [2] rests with Historic England, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Listed building Collection of protected architectural creations in the United Kingdom

A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England in England, Historic Environment Scotland in Scotland, Cadw in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland.

The Planning Act 1990 is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom that altered the laws on granting of planning permission for building works, notably including those of the listed building system in England and Wales.

Historic England Executive non-departmental public body of the British Government, tasked with protecting the historical environment of England

Historic England is an executive non-departmental public body of the British Government sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). It is tasked with protecting the historical environment of England by preserving and listing historic buildings, ancient monuments and advising central and local government.

Contents

The metropolitan county of Greater Manchester is made up of 10 metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Manchester, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan. The Grade I buildings in each borough are listed separately. Manchester, the world's first industrialised city, [3] has 15 of Greater Manchester's 45 Grade I listed buildings, the highest number of any borough. Oldham is the only borough to have no listed buildings with a Grade I rating. [4] The River Irwell forms the boundary between Manchester and Salford, so one listed structure, the railway bridge over the Irwell, has been listed under both Manchester and Salford.

Metropolitan county type of county-level administrative division of England

The metropolitan counties are a type of county-level administrative division of England. There are six metropolitan counties, which each cover large urban areas, typically with populations of 1.2 to 2.8 million. They were created in 1974 and are each divided into several metropolitan districts or boroughs.

Greater Manchester County of England

Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 2.8 million. It encompasses one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United Kingdom and comprises ten metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan, and the cities of Manchester and Salford. Greater Manchester was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972; and designated a functional city region on 1 April 2011.

Metropolitan borough type of local government district in England

A metropolitan borough is a type of local government district in England, and is a subdivision of a metropolitan county. Created in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972, metropolitan boroughs are defined in English law as metropolitan districts. However, all of them have been granted or regranted royal charters to give them borough status. Metropolitan boroughs have been effectively unitary authority areas since the abolition of the metropolitan county councils by the Local Government Act 1985. However, metropolitan boroughs pool much of their authority in joint boards and other arrangements that cover whole metropolitan counties, such as combined authorities.

Most of Greater Manchester's listed buildings date from the Victorian and Edwardian periods. [1] According to an Association for Industrial Archaeology publication, Greater Manchester is "one of the classic areas of industrial and urban growth in Britain, the result of a combination of forces that came together in the 18th and 19th centuries: a phenomenal rise in population, the appearance of the specialist industrial town, a transport revolution, and weak local lordship". [5] Much of the region, historically a part of Lancashire, was at the forefront of textile manufacturing from the early 19th century until the early 20th century, and the county includes several former mill towns. [6] [7] Greater Manchester has a wealth of industrial heritage, represented by industrial architecture found throughout the county, [7] but most of its Grade I listed buildings have a municipal, ecclesiastic or other cultural heritage.

Victorian architecture series of architectural revival styles

Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era, during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed "Victorian" architecture did not become popular until later in Victoria's reign. The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles. The name represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch. Within this naming and classification scheme, it followed Georgian architecture and later Regency architecture, and was succeeded by Edwardian architecture.

Edwardian architecture architectural style popular during the reign of King Edward VII

Edwardian architecture is an architectural style popular during the reign of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom. Architecture up to the year 1914 may also be included in this style.

The Association for Industrial Archaeology (AIA) was established in 1973 to promote the study of industrial archaeology and to encourage improved standards of recording, research, conservation and publication. It aims to support individuals and groups involved in those objectives and to represent the interests of industrial archaeology at a national level. It is a non-profit making registered charity and a company limited by guarantee, its registered office is care of the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust.

The oldest Grade I listed structure in Greater Manchester is the Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin in Eccles, completed in the 13th century but greatly expanded since then. There are eight listed manor houses, the earliest of which date from the 14th century; Wardley Hall, still in use today as the residence of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Salford, has the preserved skull of St Ambrose Barlow  – one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales  – on display in a niche at the top of the main staircase. [8] Three buildings are attributed to engineer George Stephenson. One of them, Liverpool Road railway station, is the oldest surviving railway station in the world. [9] The newest Grade I listed building in Greater Manchester is Royd House, built and designed by Edgar Wood in 1916 as his residence. [10] Twenty-two buildings, almost half of the total, were completed in the 19th century.

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Eccles Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Mary the Virgin's Church is an active Anglican parish church in Eccles, Greater Manchester, England. The church is in the Eccles deanery, the archdeaconry of Salford and the diocese of Manchester. Together with St Andrew's Eccles, St Paul's, Monton, Christ Church, Patricroft and St James', Hope the church is part of the team benefice of Eccles. The church was granted Grade I Listed status in 1964.

Eccles, Greater Manchester town in the City of Salford in Greater Manchester, England

Eccles is a town in the City of Salford Greater Manchester, England, 2.7 miles (4.3 km) west of Salford and 3.7 miles (6.0 km) west of Manchester city centre, between the M602 motorway to the north and the Manchester Ship Canal to the south.

Manor house country house that historically formed the administrative centre of a manor

A manor house was historically the main residence of the lord of the manor. The house formed the administrative centre of a manor in the European feudal system; within its great hall were held the lord's manorial courts, communal meals with manorial tenants and great banquets. The term is today loosely applied to various country houses, frequently dating from the late medieval era, which formerly housed the gentry.

Bolton

Bury

Manchester

Rochdale

Salford

Stockport

Tameside

Trafford

Wigan

See also

Architecture of Manchester

The architecture of Manchester demonstrates a rich variety of architectural styles. The city is a product of the Industrial Revolution and is known as the first modern, industrial city. Manchester is noted for its warehouses, railway viaducts, cotton mills and canals - remnants of its past when the city produced and traded goods. Manchester has minimal Georgian or medieval architecture to speak of and consequently has a vast array of 19th and early 20th-century architecture styles; examples include Palazzo, Neo-Gothic, Venetian Gothic, Edwardian baroque, Art Nouveau, Art Deco and the Neo-Classical.

This page gives an overview of the complex structure of environmental and cultural conservation in the United Kingdom.

There is a large number of Grade II listed buildings in the City of Manchester, England. The majority of Manchester's listed buildings date from the Victorian (1837–1901) and Edwardian era (1901–1911), most as a consequence of the Industrial Revolution. In England and Wales the authority for listing is granted by the Planning Act 1990 and is administered by English Heritage, an agency of the Department for Culture, Media & Sport. There are three categories of listing – Grade I, Grade II* and Grade II.

Footnotes

  1. 1 2 "What is a listed building?". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 8 December 2007.
  2. "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". Ministry of Justice. Archived from the original on 18 April 2010. Retrieved 17 December 2007.
  3. Kidd, Alan (2006). 'Manchester: A History'. Carnegie Publishing. ISBN   1-85936-128-5. Archived from the original on 27 December 2007.
  4. "Statistics by County". Images of England. Retrieved 22 December 2007.
  5. McNeil & Nevell (2000), p. 2.
  6. Cowhig, W. T. (1976). It Happened Round Greater Manchester; Textiles. Greater Manchester Council.
  7. 1 2 McNeil & Nevell (2000), pp. 2–3.
  8. Historic England. "Wardley Hall (400052)". Images of England . Retrieved 22 January 2008.
  9. "History of the Museum". Museum of Science and Industry. Retrieved 22 January 2008.
  10. 1 2 Historic England. "Royd House (1067922)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 19 July 2013.
  11. Historic England. "10, Firwood Fold (1388038)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  12. Historic England. "Smithills Hall (1388279)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  13. Historic England. "Hall i th Wood (1388052)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  14. Historic England. "Church of All Saints (1356818)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  15. Barnet, Stewart. "The Parish Church of All Saints' Stand, Whitefield". allsaintsmanchester.org. Archived from the original on 12 September 2010. Retrieved 13 February 2010.
  16. Historic England. "Church of St Mary and St Bartholomew (1163125)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  17. "Church of St Mary". bury.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 26 October 2007. Retrieved 23 December 2007.
  18. Historic England. "Church of St Mary (1067252)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  19. Historic England. "Radcliffe Tower (1309271)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  20. Historic England. "Albert Memorial (1197820)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  21. Historic England. "Baguley Hall (1291962)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  22. Canniffe (1998), p. 77.
  23. "History of Cathedral conservation area". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 December 2007.
    "Chetham's Hospital School". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 December 2007.
    "Listed buildings in Manchester by street (L)". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 December 2007.
    "Chetham's Library, Manchester". Bridgeman Art Library. Archived from the original on 3 October 2006. Retrieved 14 December 2007.
    Historic England. "Chetham's Hospital and Attached Wall (1283015)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  24. Historic England. "Roman Catholic Church of the Holy Name of Jesus (1271296)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  25. Historic England. "Church of St Ann (1247612)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  26. Historic England. "The Edgar Wood Centre (1197770)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  27. Canniffe (1998), pp. 6, 35.
  28. "Listed buildings in Manchester by street (K)". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 14 December 2007.
  29. Historic England. "Former Bank of England (1282404)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  30. Historic England. "Heaton Hall (1200809)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  31. Historic England. "John Rylands Library and Attached Railings, Gate and Lamp Standards (1217800)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  32. Historic England. "Former Liverpool Road Railway Station Masters House (1291477)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 24 July 2013.
  33. Historic England. "City Art Gallery (1282980)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 24 July 2013.
  34. Historic England. "Cathedral Church of St Mary (1218041)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 24 July 2013.
  35. Historic England. "Town Hall (1207469)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 24 July 2013.
  36. Historic England. "Old Warehouse to North of Former Liverpool Road Railway Station (1282991)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 24 July 2013.
  37. 1 2 3 4 5 6 The River Irwell is the boundary between Manchester and Salford, so one end of this bridge is in Manchester, the other is in Salford. Historic England. "Railway bridge over the River Irwell (457832)". Images of England . Retrieved 24 December 2007.
  38. 1 2 Historic England. "Railway bridge Over River Irwell to Former Liverpool Road Station (1270603)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 24 July 2013.
  39. "Church of Saint Edmund and Associated Boundary Wall, Railings and Gates". English Heritage. Archived from the original on 17 July 2013. Retrieved 25 July 2013.
  40. The church has parts dating from 1120 and 1412, but substantially from 1524. The wooden steeple, built in 1667 on top of the stone tower, is believed to be one of three remaining in the country. "Church of St Leonard". vmims.com. Archived from the original on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 24 December 2007.
  41. "Church of St Leonard". vmims.com. Archived from the original on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 24 December 2007.
  42. Historic England. "Church of St Leonard (1162332)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 25 July 2013.
  43. Cunningham, Colin (1981). Victorian and Edwardian Town Halls. Routledge. ISBN   9780710007230.
  44. Historic England. "Town Hall (1084275)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 25 July 2013.
  45. "National Collection of Lutyens' War Memorials Listed". Historic England. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  46. Historic England. "Rochdale Cenotaph (1084274)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  47. 1 2 3 "Index to the List of Buildings, Structures and Features of Architectural, Archaeological or Historic Interest in Salford". Salford City Council. Archived from the original on 4 October 2008. Retrieved 22 December 2007.
  48. Historic England. "Ordsall Hall (471593)". Images of England . Retrieved 22 December 2007.
  49. Historic England. "St Mary's Church (211935)". Images of England . Retrieved 22 December 2007.
  50. "St Mark's Church, Worsley". GENUKI.org.uk. Retrieved 13 January 2008.
  51. Hyde, O'Rourke & Portland (2004), p. 77.
  52. Historic England. "Wardley Hall (400052)". Images of England . Retrieved 22 December 2007.
  53. Historic England. "Bramall Hall (1260476)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  54. Pevsner, Nikolaus (1969). The Buildings of England: South Lancashire. Penguin Books. pp. 371–72. ISBN   0-14-071036-1.
  55. Historic England. "Church of St Elisabeth (1356851)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  56. Historic England. "Church of St George, Stockport (1067194)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 10 October 2011.
  57. Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 609.
  58. Historic England. "Church of St George (1067194)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  59. "Statutory Listing - St Thomas' Church St Thomas' Place". Stockport Historic Environment Database. Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council. Archived from the original on 20 August 2011. Retrieved 5 April 2010.
  60. Historic England. "Church of St Thomas (210875)". Images of England . Retrieved 23 December 2007.
  61. Arrowsmith, Peter (1997). Stockport: a history. Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council. ISBN   0-905164-99-7.
  62. Historic England. "Church of St Mary (210795)". Images of England . Retrieved 22 December 2007.
  63. Historic England. "Church of St Mary, Cheadle (1241643)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  64. Pevsner, Nikolaus; Hubbard, Edward (2003) [1971]. The Buildings of England: Cheshire. Yale University Press. p. 127. ISBN   0-300-09588-0.
  65. Historic England. "Church of St Anne (1309251)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 19 July 2013.
  66. "Church of St Anne". Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council. Retrieved 22 December 2007.[ permanent dead link ]
  67. Historic England. "Church of St Michael and All Angels (1162800)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 19 July 2013.
  68. Historic England. "Church of All Saints (1067879)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  69. Historic England. "Dunham Hall (1356512)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  70. Historic England. "Carriage House Immediately to South of Kitchen Courtyard (1067942)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  71. Historic England. "Stables to South of Hall (1356495)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  72. Historic England. "Old Church of St Werburg (1067865)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.
  73. Historic England. "Church of St Wilfrid (1287160)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 April 2015.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 The date given is the date used by Historic England as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the structure's description.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building and scheduled monument by Historic England.

Bibliography

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Nikolaus Pevsner German-born British scholar

Sir Nikolaus Bernhard Leon Pevsner was a German, later British scholar of the history of art, especially of architecture.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Grade I listed buildings in Greater Manchester at Wikimedia Commons

Related Research Articles

Salford city in Greater Manchester, England, UK

Salford is a part of Greater Manchester, England, approximately 1 mile west of Manchester city centre, in a meander of the River Irwell, which forms part of its boundary with the city of Manchester to the east.

Stockport town in Greater Manchester, England

Stockport is a large town in Greater Manchester, England, 7 miles (11 km) south-east of Manchester city centre, where the River Goyt and Tame merge to create the River Mersey. The town is the largest settlement in the metropolitan borough of the same name.

City of Salford Metropolitan borough and city in England

Salford is a city and metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, England, extending west to include the towns of Eccles, Worsley, Swinton, Walkden, Little Hulton, and Irlam. The city has a population of 245,600, and is administered from the Salford Civic Centre in Swinton.

High Lane village in United Kingdom

High Lane is a village in the Metropolitan Borough of Stockport, Greater Manchester, England. Historically in Cheshire, it is 5 miles (8 km) from Stockport, on the Macclesfield Canal, and has a population of 5,852.

Pendlebury town in the City of Salford, in Greater Manchester, England

Pendlebury is a suburban town in the City of Salford, Greater Manchester, England. The population at the 2011 Census was 13,069. It lies 4.1 miles (6.6 km) northwest of Manchester city centre, 3.4 miles (5.5 km) northwest of Salford, and 5.9 miles (9.5 km) southeast of Bolton.

Metropolitan Borough of Stockport Town and Metropolitan borough in England

The Metropolitan Borough of Stockport is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester in North West England. As well as the town of Stockport, it includes the outyling areas of Bramhall, Cheadle, Cheadle Hulme, Marple, Bredbury, Reddish, Woodley and Romiley. In 2001, it had a population of 284,500.

Pendleton, Greater Manchester inner city area of Salford, Greater Manchester, England

Pendleton is an inner city suburb of Salford, Greater Manchester, England, 2 miles (3.2 km) from Manchester city centre. The A6 dual carriageway skirts the east of the district.

Chadkirk Chapel church in Stockport, UK

Chadkirk Chapel is a redundant chapel near Romiley in the Metropolitan Borough of Stockport in Greater Manchester, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.

St Marys Church, Stockport Church in Greater Manchester, England

St Mary's Church is the oldest parish church in the town of Stockport, Greater Manchester, England. It stands in Churchgate overlooking the market place. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building. It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Chester, the archdeaconry of Macclesfield and the deanery of Stockport.

Scheduled monuments in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 37 scheduled monuments in Greater Manchester, a metropolitan county in North West England. In the United Kingdom, a scheduled monument is a "nationally important" archaeological site or historic building that has been given protection against unauthorised change by being placed on a list by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport; English Heritage takes the leading role in identifying such sites. Scheduled monuments are defined in the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the National Heritage Act 1983. They are also referred to as scheduled ancient monuments. There are about 18,300 scheduled monument entries on the list, which is maintained by English Heritage; more than one site can be included in a single entry. While a scheduled monument can also be recognised as a listed building, English Heritage considers listed building status as a better way of protecting buildings than scheduled monument status. If a monument is considered by English Heritage to "no longer merit scheduling" it can be descheduled.

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Underbank Hall

Underbank Hall is a 16th-century town house in the centre of Stockport, Greater Manchester, England. The hall dates back to the 15th century and is a Grade II* listed building. It was home of the Arden family of Bredbury until 1823 when it was sold by William Arden, 2nd Baron Alvanley to pay off debts, and became a bank. A banking hall was then added to the rear in 1919. The hall is still used as a bank today and currently houses the Natwest branch for Stockport.

Mellor Hall

Mellor Hall is a country hall in Mellor, Greater Manchester, England, 0.4 miles (0.64 km) north of The Devonshire Arms off Longhurst Lane.

There are 42 Grade I listed buildings in Maidstone. The Borough of Maidstone is a local government district in the English county of Kent. The district covers a largely rural area of 152 square miles (394 km2) between the North Downs and the Weald with the town of Maidstone, the county town of Kent, in the north-west. The district has a population of approximately 166,400 in 2016.

Grade I listed churches in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England. It was created by the Local Government Act 1972, and consists of the metropolitan boroughs of Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan and the cities of Manchester and Salford. This is a complete list of the Grade I listed churches in the metropolitan county as recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Buildings are listed by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport on the recommendation of English Heritage. Grade I listed buildings are defined as being of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; only 2.5 per cent of listed buildings are included in this grade.

Swinton and Pendlebury is a town in the City of Salford Metropolitan Borough, Greater Manchester, England. It contains 23 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, one is at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The listed buildings include houses, churches and items in churchyards, a public house, aqueducts, a railway viaduct, cemetery buildings, a bandstand and war memorials.