Ship Canal House

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Ship Canal House

Ship Canal House.jpg

Ship Canal House, Manchester
General information
Status Grade II listed
Architectural style Neo-classical
Location King Street, Manchester, England.
Coordinates 53°28′51″N2°14′35″W / 53.4807°N 2.2431°W / 53.4807; -2.2431 Coordinates: 53°28′51″N2°14′35″W / 53.4807°N 2.2431°W / 53.4807; -2.2431
Completed 1927 (1927)
Client Manchester Ship Canal Company
Owner HIMOR Group
Design and construction
Architect Harry S. Fairhurst

Ship Canal House is a building in Manchester, England, which was built in 1927 for the Manchester Ship Canal Company. [1] The building is located on King Street, historically the centre for Manchester's banking industry.

King Street, Manchester road in Manchester city center, England

King Street is one of the most important thoroughfares of Manchester city centre, England. Formerly the centre of the north-west banking industry it has become progressively dominated by expensive shops.

The building was designed by Harry S Fairhurst in a neo-classical style and displays some Art Deco and Edwardian Baroque motifs such as square windows and roof sculptures which were prevalent during the 1920s. [2] It stands 46 metres tall with 11 storeys and is clad in Portland stone. It was one of the tallest office blocks in the United Kingdom when completed in 1927. [3] The building built by J. Gerrard & Sons Ltd of Swinton was Grade II listed in 1982. [4] Ship Canal House was sold in 2011 for £22.8 million. [5]

Art Deco influential visual arts design style which first appeared in France during the 1920s

Art Deco, sometimes referred to as Deco, is a style of visual arts, architecture and design that first appeared in France just before World War I. Art Deco influenced the design of buildings, furniture, jewelry, fashion, cars, movie theatres, trains, ocean liners, and everyday objects such as radios and vacuum cleaners. It took its name, short for Arts Décoratifs, from the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes held in Paris in 1925. It combined modernist styles with fine craftsmanship and rich materials. During its heyday, Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress.

Edwardian Baroque architecture Neo-Baroque architectural style of many public buildings built in the British Empire during the Edwardian era

Edwardian Baroque is the Neo-Baroque architectural style of many public buildings built in the British Empire during the Edwardian era (1901–1910).

Portland stone Limestone quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset, England

Portland stone is a limestone from the Tithonian stage of the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. The quarries consist of beds of white-grey limestone separated by chert beds. It has been used extensively as a building stone throughout the British Isles, notably in major public buildings in London such as St Paul's Cathedral and Buckingham Palace. Portland stone is also exported to many countries—being used for example in the United Nations headquarters building in New York City.

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Manchester Ship Canal canal

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References

  1. "The House on Ship Canal House". skyliner.org. Retrieved 2012-10-05.
  2. "Ship Canal House". skyscrapernews.com. Retrieved 2012-10-05.
  3. Hartwell, Clare (2001). Manchester - Pevsner Architectural Guides. p. 164.
  4. "Ship Canal House, Manchester". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2012-10-05.
  5. "Ship Canal House sold to HIMOR Group for £22.8m". Manchester Evening News . 1 February 2011. Retrieved 2012-10-05.