Brownsfield Mill

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Brownsfield Mill Brownfields Mill, Ancoats, Manchester.jpg
Brownsfield Mill

Brownsfield Mill, Binns Place, Great Ancoats Street, Manchester, England, is an early nineteenth century room and power mill constructed in 1825. [1] Hartwell describes it as "unusually complete and well preserved." [1] It is a Grade II* listed building. [2] The building housed the Avro, A.V. Roe and Company aviation factory in the early twentieth century. [3]

Great Ancoats Street

Great Ancoats Street is a street in the inner suburb of Ancoats, Manchester, England. Much of Great Ancoats Street was originally named Ancoats Lane and was the location of Ancoats Hall. The street passed through a thriving manufacturing area during the 19th century. It was in close proximity to the Ashton and Rochdale canals. A number of cotton mills built in the early and mid-Victorian period are nearby, some of which have been converted into residential or office buildings, such as Albion Mills. The Pin Mill Works at the junction with Fairfield Street was a late 18th-century pin works, that became a cotton mill run by J & J Thompson and works for dyeing and calico-printing. Brownsfield Mill, a Grade II* listed building, was built in 1825.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 2.8 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Avro aircraft manufacturer

Avro was a British aircraft manufacturer. Its designs include the Avro 504, used as a trainer in the First World War, the Avro Lancaster, one of the pre-eminent bombers of the Second World War, and the delta wing Avro Vulcan, a stalwart of the Cold War.

Contents

Avro blue plaque Brownfields Mill 4.jpg
Avro blue plaque

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 Pevsner Architectural Guides: Manchester, page 284
  2. Brownfield Mill, Heritage Gateway, retrieved 15 January 2012
  3. "Avro & Saro Factory Sites - Brownsfield Mills". Avro Aircraft. Retrieved 27 January 2019.

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References

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Coordinates: 53°28′56″N2°13′44″W / 53.4821°N 2.2290°W / 53.4821; -2.2290

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.