Church of St James, Didsbury

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St James, Didsbury, on Stenner Lane, is a Grade II* Church of England church in the Manchester suburb of Didsbury and with Emmanuel church is part of the parish of St James and Emmanuel, Didsbury.

Church of England Anglican state church of England

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Didsbury area of the City of Manchester, England

Didsbury is a suburban area of Manchester, England, on the north bank of the River Mersey, 4.5 miles (7.2 km) south of Manchester city centre. The population at the 2011 census was 26,788.

Contents

St James, Didsbury, Manchester

Exterior of St James.JPG

St James, Didsbury
53°24′36″N2°13′54″W / 53.4100°N 2.2318°W / 53.4100; -2.2318 Coordinates: 53°24′36″N2°13′54″W / 53.4100°N 2.2318°W / 53.4100; -2.2318
Denomination Church of England
Churchmanship Open Evangelical
History
Dedication St James
Administration
Parish St James & Emmanuel, Didsbury
Deanery Withington deanery
Archdeaconry Manchester archdeaconry
Diocese Diocese of Manchester
Clergy
Priest(s) Nicholas Bundock, Ben Edson, Christine Sandiford, Ali Oxborrow

History

In 1235 Albertus de Gresley granted land to Nicholas de Longford, Lord of the Manor of Withington, for the foundation of his own chapel in Didsbury. The first mention of the chapel is in the records of the Lancashire Assizes when 'William, Chaplain of Didsbury, came not on the first day and was fined'.

Withington suburb of Manchester, England

Withington is a suburb of south Manchester, England. Historically part of Lancashire, it lies 4 miles (6.4 km) from Manchester city centre, about 0.4 miles (0.6 km) south of Fallowfield, 0.5 miles (0.8 km) north-east of Didsbury and 1 mile (1.6 km) east of Chorlton-cum-Hardy. Withington has a population of just over 14,000 people, reducing at the 2011 census to 13,422.

In 1352 the Bishop of Lichfield gave permission for the consecration of a churchyard for the burial of the victims of the Black Death.

The Bishop of Lichfield is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Lichfield in the Province of Canterbury.

Black Death Pandemic in Eurasia in the 1300s

The Black Death, also known as the Great Plague, the Black Plague, or the Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people in Eurasia and peaking in Europe from 1347 to 1351. The bacterium Yersinia pestis, which results in several forms of plague, is believed to have been the cause. The Black Death was the first major European outbreak of plague, and the second plague pandemic. The plague created a series of religious, social and economic upheavals, which had profound effects on the course of European history.

In 1541 the Diocese of Chester was formed and the church was transferred from the Diocese of Lichfield. The parish covered an area from the River Mersey to Moss Side and from Chorlton-cum-Hardy to Heaton Norris and Reddish.

Diocese of Chester

The Diocese of Chester is a Church of England diocese in the Province of York covering the pre-1974 county of Cheshire and therefore including the Wirral and parts of Stockport, Trafford and Tameside.

Diocese of Lichfield

The Diocese of Lichfield is a Church of England diocese in the Province of Canterbury, England. The bishop's seat is located in the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Chad in the city of Lichfield. The diocese covers 4,516 km2 (1,744 sq mi) of several counties: all of Staffordshire, northern Shropshire, a significant portion of the West Midlands, and very small portions of Warwickshire and Powys (Wales).

River Mersey Major river emptying into Liverpool Bay

The River Mersey is a river in the North West of England. Its name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon language and translates as "boundary river". The river may have been the border between the ancient kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria and for centuries it formed part of the boundary between the historic counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.

In accordance with the orders of Elizabeth I all records of births, deaths and marriages began to be recorded in 1561. The original register is in the City of Manchester archives and includes the record of the baptism of Saint Ambrose Barlow on 30 November 1585.

Elizabeth I of England Queen regnant of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until 1603

Elizabeth I was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last of the five monarchs of the House of Tudor.

Ambrose Barlow English Benedictine martyr

Ambrose Edward Barlow, O.S.B., was an English Benedictine monk who is venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. He is one of a group of saints canonized by Pope Paul VI who became known as the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.

Baptism Record of Ambrose Barlow Baptism entry for Ambrose Barlow.jpg
Baptism Record of Ambrose Barlow

Architecture and setting

St James is an ancient Anglican church of medieval origins with significant subsequent 17th and mid-19th century modifications. [1] The church was designated a Grade II* listed building on 25 February 1952. [2]

The original chapel is believed to have been a 13th-century oratory. Rebuilding, including the "dumpy" tower, took place in the early 17th century. [1] A memorial stone over the tower's north door commemorates its benefactors, Sir Edward Moseley and Anne Mosley and the date 1620. The pinnacles and loops surmounting the tower are from 1801. The Mosley family, local magnates, were the benefactors. The chapel became the parish church of Didsbury in 1850. [1] The nave was constructed in 1855, the chancel in 1871 and the east part of the south aisle in 1895. [2] The church is of red sandstone with slate roofs.

Pevsner found the interior "odd, [with] early seventeenth century fabric, but later additions and alterations [have] changed its character". [1] The 18th-centuries galleries have been removed and substantial reconstruction took place in the 1850s and 1890s. [1] The stained glass is all 19th century. The church contains impressive funerary monuments, particularly of the Mosley family. A "good early C17 wall monument in Renaissance style ... a 3-bay Ionic colonnade surmounted by a central Corinthian architrave with cresting, with kneeling figures in each part" commemorates Ralph Mosley, who died in 1616. [2] Sir Nicholas Mosley, the builder of Hough End Hall, is shown kneeling, "dressed in the robes of the Lord Mayor of London (1599)". [1] The Mosley heiress, Ann, Lady Bland, the founder of St Ann's Church, Manchester, is also represented. [1]

The interior of the church underwent significant repair and renovation in 2012 as part of the 775th anniversary celebrations.

Bell tower

St James Bell Chamber St James Bell Tower.JPG
St James Bell Chamber

The six St James’ bells date from 1727 and were cast in Gloucester. The bells are rung before worship on Sunday and for weddings and special occasions.

See also

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Notes

Bibliography

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