50 Newton Street

Last updated
50 Newton Street 50 Newton Street Manchester.jpg
50 Newton Street

50 Newton Street Newton Buildings, is a Grade II listed [1] former warehouse in Manchester, England. Located on Newton Street in the Northern Quarter area, it was built in 1906-8 by a design from Charles Clegg & Son. It was designed with a degree of flair and panache and is described by English Heritage as an example of "Free Baroque" architecture. [2] The hat factory it replaced was destroyed by fire in 1906.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous metropolitan area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

English Heritage charity responsible for the National Heritage Collection of England


English Heritage is a charity that manages over 400 historic monuments, buildings and places. These include prehistoric sites, medieval castles, Roman forts and country houses. The charity states that it uses these properties to ‘bring the story of England to life for over 10 million people each year’.

Contents

See also

Related Research Articles

King Street, Manchester road in Manchester city center, England

King Street is one of the most important thoroughfares of Manchester city centre, England. Formerly the centre of the north-west banking industry it has become progressively dominated by expensive shops.

The Principal Manchester

The Principal Manchester, originally known as the Refuge Assurance Building or Refuge Building after the insurance company stands at the corner of Oxford Street and Whitworth Street in Manchester, England. The building was later known as the Palace Hotel.

Edgar Wood English architect

Edgar Wood (1860–1935) was an architect, artist and draftsman who practised from Manchester at the turn of the 20th century and gained a considerable reputation in the United Kingdom. He was regarded as a proponent of the Arts and Crafts movement which was prevalent between 1860 and 1910.

Bridgewater House, Manchester warehouse in Manchester, England

Bridgewater House, Manchester is a packing and shipping warehouse at 58–60 Whitworth Street, Manchester, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Manchester Law Library

The former Manchester Law Library is a Grade II* listed building in the Venetian Gothic style at 14 Kennedy Street, Manchester. "The building is noteworthy by virtue of having been built for the purposes of a law library and, London and the old universities aside, it is believed to have performed this function for a period longer than any other provincial law library".

Asia House, Manchester

Asia House at No. 82 Princess Street, Manchester, England, is an early 20th century packing and shipping warehouse built between 1906 and 1909 in an Edwardian Baroque style. It is a Grade II* listed building as at 3 October 1974. Nikolaus Pevsner's The Buildings of England describes the warehouse, and its companion, No. 86, Manchester House, as "quite splendid ... good examples of the warehouse type designed for multiple occupation by shipping merchants". It attributes its design to I.R.E. Birkett, architect of the Grade II listed companion building, Manchester House, which is similar in design. English Heritage attributes it to Harry S. Fairhurst. Asia House has an "exceptionally rich" entrance hall and stairwell, "lined with veined marble and green and cream faience, with designs of trees and Art Nouveau stained glass".

Lancaster House, Manchester

Lancaster House in Whitworth Street, Manchester, England, was a packing and shipping warehouse built between 1905 and 1910 for Lloyd's Packing Warehouses Limited, which had, by merger, become the dominant commercial packing company in early 20th century Manchester. It is in the favoured Edwardian Baroque style and constructed of red brick and orange terracotta. It is a Grade II* listed building as of 3 October 1974.

India House, Manchester

India House in Whitworth Street, Manchester, England, is a packing and shipping warehouse built in 1906 for Lloyd's Packing Warehouses Limited, which had, by merger, become the dominant commercial packing company in early-20th century Manchester. It is in the favoured Edwardian Baroque style and is steel-framed, with cladding of buff terracotta and red brick with buff terracotta dressings. It is a Grade II* listed building as of 3 October 1974.

Tootal, Broadhurst and Lee Building, Manchester

The Tootal, Broadhurst and Lee Building at No. 56 Oxford Street, in Manchester, England, is a late Victorian warehouse and office block built in a neo-Baroque style for Tootal Broadhurst Lee, a firm of textile manufacturers. It was designed by J. Gibbons Sankey and constructed between 1896 and 1898. It has been designated a Grade II* listed building.

38 and 42 Mosley Street

38 and 42 Mosley Street in Manchester, England, is a double-block Victorian bank constructed between 1862 and c. 1880 for the Manchester and Salford Bank. It was occupied in 2001 by the Royal Bank of Scotland. The original block of 1862 was the "last great work" of Edward Walters, and the extension of the 1880s was by his successors Barker and Ellis. It is a Grade II* listed building.

Former National Westminster Bank, Spring Gardens, Manchester

The former National Westminster Bank in Spring Gardens, Manchester, England, is an Edwardian bank building constructed in 1902 for Parr's Bank by Charles Heathcote. The bank is in a "bold Edwardian Baroque" style. It is a Grade II* listed building as of 25 February 1952.

1830 warehouse, Liverpool Road railway station 19th-century warehouse in Manchester, England

The 1830 warehouse, Liverpool Road, Manchester, is a 19th-century warehouse that forms part of the Liverpool Road railway station complex. It was built in five months between April and September 1830, "almost certainly [to the designs of] the Liverpool architect Thomas Haigh". The heritage listing report attributes the work to George Stephenson and his son, Robert. It has been listed Grade I on the National Heritage List for England since May 1973.

Portland Street, Manchester

Portland Street is a street which runs from Piccadilly at its junction with Newton Street southwards to Oxford Street at its junction with Chepstow Street in Manchester, England. The major buildings of Portland Street include the largest former warehouse in the city centre, Watts Warehouse, the former Bank of England Building and other former warehouses on the corners of Princess Street.

Brownsfield Mill

Brownsfield Mill, Binns Place, Great Ancoats Street, Manchester, England, is an early nineteenth century room and power mill constructed in 1825. Hartwell describes it as "unusually complete and well preserved." It is a Grade II* listed building. The building housed the Avro, A.V. Roe and Company aviation factory in the early twentieth century.

53 King Street Edwardian Baroque bank on King Street in Manchester, England

53 King Street is an Edwardian Baroque bank on King Street in Manchester, England. Designed by architect Charles Heathcote, it opened in 1913 and was granted Grade II listed building status in 1974. It used to house a branch of Lloyds TSB. In 2009, the building was sold for £6 million. The building stands on the site of the old Manchester Town Hall.

Canada House, Manchester grade II listed architectural structure in Manchester, United kingdom

Canada House is an Art Nouveau-style office building on Chepstow Street in Manchester, England. Constructed originally as a packing warehouse, the building opened in 1909. Designed by local architects W & G Higginbottom, the building has features consistent with art nouveau and has a terracotta exterior.

46–48 Brown Street Manchester, Greater Manchester, M2

46–48 Brown Street is a grade-II building in Manchester, England. Situated in the Spring Gardens area of Manchester city centre near King Street, it was home to Brook's Bank. The building is also known as Lombard Chambers.

There is a large number of Grade II listed buildings in the City of Manchester, England. The majority of Manchester's listed buildings date from the Victorian (1837–1901) and Edwardian era (1901–1911), most as a consequence of the Industrial Revolution. In England and Wales the authority for listing is granted by the Planning Act 1990 and is administered by English Heritage, an agency of the Department for Culture, Media & Sport. There are three categories of listing – Grade I, Grade II* and Grade II.

Spring Gardens, Manchester thoroughfare in Manchester, England

Spring Gardens is an important thoroughfare in Manchester city centre. This L-shaped street, formerly the centre of the north-west banking industry, has five Grade II listed buildings and is part of the Upper King Street conservation area.

Church of St John the Divine, Brooklands Church in Greater Manchester, England

The Church of St John the Divine is a Church of England parish church in Brooklands, Sale, Greater Manchester. The church is a grade II* listed building.

References

  1. Historic England. "Newton Buildings  (Grade II) (1246388)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 4 February 2017.
  2. "Newton Buildings, Manchester". British Listed Buildings.

Coordinates: 53°28′55″N2°13′58″W / 53.4819°N 2.2327°W / 53.4819; -2.2327

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.