Lincoln House, Manchester

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Lincoln House

Lincoln House, Manchester.jpg

Lincoln House from Deansgate
General information
Type Office
Architectural style Postmodernism
Location Manchester
Country United Kingdom
Completed 1986
Demolished 2017
Design and construction
Architect Holford Associates

Lincoln House was an office building on Deansgate in Manchester, England. It was designed in the 1980s by Holford Associates. It was completely clad in glass and was designed as a deliberate response to the 1960s and 1970s Brutalist architecture that engulfed many British cities. It was built in 1986 for the Lincoln House Chambers, a legal practise based in Manchester. [1]

Deansgate road in Manchester, England

Deansgate is a main road through Manchester city centre, England. It runs roughly north–south in a near straight route through the western part of the city centre and is the longest road in the city centre at over one mile long.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Glass amorphous solid that exhibits a glass transition when heated towards the liquid state

Glass is a non-crystalline, amorphous solid that is often transparent and has widespread practical, technological, and decorative uses in, for example, window panes, tableware, and optoelectronics. The most familiar, and historically the oldest, types of manufactured glass are "silicate glasses" based on the chemical compound silica (silicon dioxide, or quartz), the primary constituent of sand. The term glass, in popular usage, is often used to refer only to this type of material, which is familiar from use as window glass and in glass bottles. Of the many silica-based glasses that exist, ordinary glazing and container glass is formed from a specific type called soda-lime glass, composed of approximately 75% silicon dioxide (SiO2), sodium oxide (Na2O) from sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), calcium oxide (CaO), also called lime, and several minor additives.

By the 1980s the Manchester City Council Planning Department rejected Brutalist proposals in the city believing such buildings to be cold and depressing pieces of architecture. The department were instead inclined to approve safe architecture such as brick buildings. Holford Associates set about fulfilling this move forward by proposing a glass building which demonstrated the latest technologies and improvements in neoprene sealants. [2]

Manchester City Council Local government body in England

Manchester City Council is the local government authority for Manchester, a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. It is composed of 96 councillors, three for each of the 32 electoral wards of Manchester. The council is controlled by the Labour Party and led by Sir Richard Leese. The opposition is formed by the Liberal Democrats and led by former Manchester Withington MP John Leech. Joanne Roney is the chief executive. Many of the council's staff are based at Manchester Town Hall.

Neoprene synthetic polymer resembling rubber, resistant to oil, heat, and weathering.

Neoprene is a family of synthetic rubbers that are produced by polymerization of chloroprene. Neoprene exhibits good chemical stability and maintains flexibility over a wide temperature range. Neoprene is sold either as solid rubber or in latex form and is used in a wide variety of applications, such as laptop sleeves, orthopaedic braces, electrical insulation, liquid and sheet applied elastomeric membranes or flashings, and automotive fan belts.

It was demolished in 2017. [3]

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References

Citations
  1. "Lincoln House" . Retrieved 2012-11-26.
  2. Parkinson-Bailey 2000 , p. 225
  3. Smithers, Dominic (11 October 2017). "Watch as Deansgate office block gets taken apart in matter of seconds". men.
Bibliography
International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Coordinates: 53°28′48″N2°14′53″W / 53.4801°N 2.2481°W / 53.4801; -2.2481

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.