North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball

Last updated
North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball
Basketball current event.svg 2022–23 North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball team
North Carolina Tar Heels logo.svg
UniversityUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Head coach Courtney Banghart (3rd season)
Conference ACC
Location Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Arena Carmichael Auditorium (1975–2008)
Dean Smith Center (2008–2009)
Carmichael Arena (2009–present)
(Capacity: 6,822)
Nickname Tar Heels
ColorsCarolina blue and white [1]
   
Uniforms
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Home
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Away


NCAA Tournament Champions
1994
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1994, 2006, 2007
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1994, 1998, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2014
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1984, 1986, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2014, 2015, 2022
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2019, 2021, 2022
Conference tournament champions
1984, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008
Conference regular season champions
1997, 2005, 2006, 2008

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball team represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I women's college basketball. They are led by head coach Courtney Banghart, who will enter her second season.

Contents

Home arenas

While historic Carmichael Auditorium was under renovation, the women's team played the 2008–09 season at the Dean Smith Center to the south of campus. The final game at the old Carmichael was an 82–51 rout of local rivals Duke in front of a sell-out 8,010 attendance, completing an unbeaten home and conference season. [2] Upon reopening, the building's name was changed to Carmichael Arena.

2021–22 roster

2021–22 North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball team
PlayersCoaches
Pos.#NameHeightYearPrevious schoolHometown
F 0Alexandria Zelaya6 ft 4 in(1.93 m)So Millennium Goodyear, AZ
G 1Alyssa Ustby6 ft 1 in(1.85 m)So Lourdes Rochester, MN
G 2Carlie Littlefield5 ft 9 in(1.75 m)GS Waukee
Princeton
Waukee, IA
G 3Kennedy Todd-Williams5 ft 11 in(1.8 m)So Jacksonville Jacksonville, NC
G 10Eva Hodgson5 ft 11 in(1.8 m)RS Jr New Hampton School
William & Mary
Rindge, NH
G 11Ariel Young  Cruz Roja.svg 6 ft 1 in(1.85 m)RS Jr Lincoln
Michigan
Tallahassee, FL
G/F 13Teonni Key  Cruz Roja.svg 6 ft 3 in(1.91 m)Fr Cary Cary, NC
G 14Kayla McPherson  Cruz Roja.svg 5 ft 7 in(1.7 m)FrMadison County Hull, GA
G/F 20Destiny Adams6 ft 0 in(1.83 m)Fr Manchester Township Whiting, NJ
F 21Malu Tshitenge6 ft 3 in(1.91 m)Jr St. John's College Germantown, MD
F 24Morasha Wiggins6 ft 0 in(1.83 m)FrKalamazoo Kalamazoo, MI
G 25Deja Kelly5 ft 8 in(1.73 m)So Duncanville San Antonio, TX
F 30Jaelynn Murray6 ft 2 in(1.88 m)RS Sr Dreher Columbia, SC
F 31Anya Poole6 ft 2 in(1.88 m)So Southeast Raleigh Raleigh, NC
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (S) Suspended
  • (I) Ineligible
  • (W) Walk-on

Roster
Last update: October 21, 2021

Retired and honored jerseys

For a player to have her jersey honored and hung in the Carmichael Auditorium rafters, she must have been a first-team All-American, been a member of an Olympic team as an undergraduate, or been selected by the coaches as Most Valuable Player of a national championship team. For retiring a jersey, a player must be named national player of the year. [3]

Name  #  
RetiredCharlotte Smith23
Ivory Latta 12
  Honored  Marsha Mann44
  Bernadette McGlade  14
Kathy Crawford25
Tresa Brown24
Pam Leake20
Tonya Sampson34
Sylvia Crawley 00
Marion Jones 20
Tracy Reid 00
LaQuanda Barksdale33
Nikki Teasley 44
Camille Little 20
Erlana Larkins 2

All-time record

The women's basketball team was officially established in 1971 as part of the Department of Physical Education. In 1974, basketball and several other women's sports came under the direction of the athletic department with Angela Lumpkin as coach. Conference play began in 1978, with a first qualification for the NCAA tournament in 1983. [3]

Conference tournament winners noted with #

SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseasonCoaches' pollAP poll
Angela Lumpkin (Independent)(1974–1977)
1974–75Angela Lumpkin 15–3 NWIT First Round
1975–76Angela Lumpkin 16–7 NCAIAW Tournament
1976–77Angela Lumpkin 8–16 NCAIAW Tournament
Angela Lumpkin:39–26 
Atlantic Coast Conference
Jennifer Alley (ACC)(1977–1986)
1977–78Jennifer Alley 16–136–43rdAIAW Southern Region II
1978–79Jennifer Alley 18–144–54thAIAW Region II Tournament
1979–80Jennifer Alley 21–155–5T-4thNWIT Finals
1980–81Jennifer Alley 17–145–45thNCAIAW Tournament
1981–82Jennifer Alley 17–1210–33rd
1982–83Jennifer Alley 22–810–3T-2ndNCAA First Round18
1983–84Jennifer Alley 24–89–5T-3rd#NCAA Sweet Sixteen14
1984–85Jennifer Alley 21–1111–32ndNCAA First Round
1985–86Jennifer Alley 23–910–42ndNCAA Sweet Sixteen1516
Jennifer Alley:179–10470–36
Sylvia Hatchell (ACC)(1986–2019)
1986–87Sylvia Hatchell 19–109–53rdNCAA Second Round (Bye)
1987–88Sylvia Hatchell 10–174–106th
1988–89Sylvia Hatchell 10–201–138th
1989–90Sylvia Hatchell 13–153–118th
1990–91Sylvia Hatchell 12–162–128th
1991–92Sylvia Hatchell 22–99–7T-3rdNCAA Second Round (Bye)
1992–93Sylvia Hatchell 23–711–5T-2ndNCAA Sweet Sixteen1517
1993–94Sylvia Hatchell 33–214–22ndNCAA Champions14
1994–95Sylvia Hatchell 30–512–42ndNCAA Sweet Sixteen1111
1995–96Sylvia Hatchell 13–148–85th
1996–97Sylvia Hatchell 29–315–11stNCAA Sweet Sixteen94
1997–98Sylvia Hatchell 27–711–54thNCAA Elite Eight37
1998–99Sylvia Hatchell 28–811–5T-3rdNCAA Sweet Sixteen1414
1999–2000Sylvia Hatchell 20–138–95thNCAA Sweet Sixteen18
2000–01Sylvia Hatchell 15–147–97th
2001–02Sylvia Hatchell 26–911–52ndNCAA Sweet Sixteen1116
2002–03Sylvia Hatchell 28–613–32ndNCAA Second Round1512
2003–04Sylvia Hatchell 24–712–42ndNCAA First Round2112
2004–05Sylvia Hatchell 30–412–2T-1stNCAA Elite Eight64
2005–06Sylvia Hatchell 33–213–11stNCAA Final Four31
2006–07Sylvia Hatchell 34–411–32ndNCAA Final Four32
2007–08Sylvia Hatchell 33–314–01stNCAA Elite Eight52
2008–09Sylvia Hatchell 28–710–44thNCAA Second Round1711
2009–10Sylvia Hatchell 19–126–8T-7thNCAA First Round
2010–11Sylvia Hatchell 28–98–66thNCAA Sweet Sixteen1214
2011–12Sylvia Hatchell 20–119–7T-6th
2012–13Sylvia Hatchell 29–714–4T-2nd NCAA second round 1813
2013–14Sylvia Hatchell 27–1010–6T-5th NCAA Elite Eight 1213
2014–15Sylvia Hatchell 26–910–66th NCAA Sweet Sixteen 1512
2015–16Sylvia Hatchell 14–184–1212th
2016–17Sylvia Hatchell 15–163–13T–13
2017–18Sylvia Hatchell 14–154–1213th
2018–19Sylvia Hatchell 18–158–88th NCAA first round
Sylvia Hatchell:751–324297–209
Courtney Banghart (ACC)(2019–present)
2019–20Courtney Banghart 16–147–11T–11th
2020–21Courtney Banghart 13–118–98th NCAA first round
2021–22Courtney Banghart 25–713–5T-3rd NCAA Sweet Sixteen 17
Courtney Banghart:54–3228–25
Total:1023–486

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

NCAA tournament results

YearSeedRoundOpponentResult
1983 #7First Round#2 GeorgiaL 72–70
1984 #2First Round
Sweet Sixteen
#7 St. John's
#3 Cheyney
W 81–79 (OT)
L 73–72 (OT)
1985 #6First Round#3 Penn StateL 98–79
1986 #4First Round
Sweet Sixteen
#5 UNLV
#1 USC
W 82–76
L 84–70
1987 #4First Round#5 Old DominionL 76–58
1992 #7First Round
Second Round
#10 Old Dominion
#2 Miami (FL)
W 60–54
L 86–72
1993 #4First Round
Second Round
#5 Alabama
#1 Tennessee
W 74–73 (OT)
L 74–54
1994 #3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Championship
#14 Georgia Southern
#6 Old Dominion
#2 Vanderbilt
#1 Connecticut
#1 Purdue
#3 Louisiana Tech
W 101–53
W 62–52
W 73–69
W 81–69
W 89–74
W 60–59
1995 #3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#14 Western Illinois
#6 Seton Hall
#2 Stanford
W 89–48
W 59–45
L 81–71
1997 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#16 Harvard
#8 Michigan State
#5 George Washington
W –53
W 81–71
L 55–46
1998 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Howard
#7 FIU
#3 Illinois
#1 Tennessee
W 91–71
W 85–72
W 80–74
L 76–70
1999 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Northeastern
#5 Alabama
#1 Purdue
W 64–55
W 70–56
L 82–59
2000 #5First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#12 Maine
#13 Rice
#1 Georgia
W 62–57
W 83–50
L 83–57
2002 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Harvard
#5 Minnesota
#1 Vanderbilt
W 85–58
W 72–69
L 70–61
2003 #3First Round
Second Round
#14 Austin Peay
#6 Colorado
W 72–70
L 86–67
2004 #4First Round#13 MTSUL 67–62
2005 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Coppin State
#9 George Washington
#5 Arizona State
#2 Baylor
W 97–62
W 71–47
W 79–72
L 72–63
2006 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 UC Riverside
#8 Vanderbilt
#4 Purdue
#2 Tennessee
#1 Maryland
W 75–51
W 89–70
W 70–68
W 75–63
L 81–70
2007 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 Prairie View A&M
#9 Notre Dame
#5 George Washington
#2 Purdue
#1 Tennessee
W 95–38
W 60–51
W 70–56
W 84–72
L 56–50
2008 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Bucknell
#8 Georgia
#4 Louisville
#2 LSU
W 85–50
W 80–66
W 78–74
L 56–50
2009 #3First Round
Second Round
#14 UCF
#6 Purdue
W 85–80
L 85–70
2010 #10First Round#7 GonzagaL 82–76
2011 #5First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#12 Fresno State
#4 Kentucky
#1 Stanford
W 82–68
W 86–74
L 72–65
2013 #3First Round
Second Round
#14 Albany
#6 Delaware
W 59–54
L 78–69
2014 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#13 UT Martin
#5 Michigan State
#1 South Carolina
#2 Stanford
W 60–58
W 62–53
W 65–58
L 74–65
2015 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Liberty
#5 Ohio State
#1 South Carolina
W 71–65
W 86–84
L 67–65
2019 #9First Round#8 CaliforniaL 92–72
2021 #10First Round#7 AlabamaL 71–80
2022 #5First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#12 Stephen F. Austin
#4 Arizona
#1 South Carolina
W 79–66
W 63–45
L 61–69

See also

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The 2018–19 North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 2018–19 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Tar Heels, led by thirty-third year head coach Sylvia Hatchell, play their games at Carmichael Arena and are members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 18–15, 9–9 in ACC play to finish in eighth place. They defeat Georgia Tech in the first round before losing in the second round of the ACC Women's Tournament to Notre Dame. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Women's Tournament, which was their first trip since 2015. They lost in the first round to California.

The 2019–20 North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 2019–20 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Tar Heels, led by first year head coach Courtney Banghart, played their games at Carmichael Arena and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The 2022–23 North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball team will represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for the 2022–23 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Tar Heels will be led by head coach Courtney Banghart, in her fourth season as the Tar Heel head coach. She will be assisted by Joanne Aluka-White, Adrian Walters, and Itoro Coleman. The Tar Heels will play their home games at Carmichael Arena as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

References

  1. Primary Identity (PDF). Carolina Athletics Brand Identity Guidelines. April 20, 2015. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  2. "UNC runs the table in ACC." espn.com. Retrieved on March 29, 2008.
  3. 1 2 "2007–08 North Carolina Women's Basketball Media Guide." tarheelblue.com. Retrieved on March 29, 2008.