ONE Party

Last updated

ONE Party
General SecretaryOlivia Mackenzie [1]
Co-leadersEdward Shanly and Stephanie Harawira
FoundedSeptember 2019
Ideology Christian fundamentalism
Social conservatism
multiconfessional Theocracy
Colours  Yellow and Black
SloganVote Kingdom
MPs in the House of Representatives
0 / 120
Website
https://oneparty.net/

The One Party (stylised as ONE Party) is a Christian fundamentalist political party in New Zealand, led by Edward Shanly and by Stephanie Harawira, an activist opposing synthetic drugs. The party states that New Zealand is a "Christian nation", and should be run as such. [2] It opposes abortion [3] and euthanasia. [4] Harawira incorporated One Party Limited as a New Zealand limited company in September 2019. [5]

Contents

Ideology and structure

The ONE Party believes that God should be above politicians, and envisages its MPs entering Parliament if elected but answerable to an Apostolic Council of religious leaders from various faiths and cultural backgrounds. [6] The party generally leans towards the pentecostal and evangelical wing of Christianity, [7] though Hawawira says: "We didn't come together as Baptists, as Anglicans or Methodists. We came together just as people, who love the Lord." [8] Prophecy is important to the party; candidates have spoken of being given a sign or message that it is their destiny to become politicians, [9] and Harawira states that God has spoken directly to her. [10]

2020 election

The One Party became registered on 9 July 2020. [1] [11] It received a broadcasting allocation of $41,457 for the 2020 election. [12]

The party was to hold its launch at Marsden Cross in Rangihoua Bay (site of the first Christian service in New Zealand, in 1814) on 27 June 2020. [13] [14] It said that it would run 20 candidates in both general and Māori electorates. [15]

The party reached an arrangement with Vision NZ, another Christian-based party. One Party did not stand a candidate in the Waiariki electorate, where Vision's leader Hannah Tamaki ran. In return, Vision NZ promised to not stand a candidate in Te Tai Tokerau. The One Party was approached about joining an alliance of parties that included the New Zealand Public Party, led by Billy Te Kahika, who is also a Christian. However, Harawira has said that their respective parties' kaupapa do not align. [16] The One Party encouraged supporters in electorates where it was not running a candidate to abstain from the electorate vote. [16]

At the election, held on 17 October, the One Party won no electorate seats and received 8,121 party votes (0.3%), which was not enough to enter Parliament under New Zealand's Mixed Member Proportional electoral system. [17]

A 2020 election hoarding for the One Party, with the slogan "Party Vote Kingdom" ONE Party Billboard.jpg
A 2020 election hoarding for the One Party, with the slogan "Party Vote Kingdom"

Election results

House of Representatives

ElectionCandidates nominatedSeats wonVotesVote share %PositionMPs in
parliament
ElectorateList
2020 283908,1210.311
0 / 120

See also

Related Research Articles

Hone Harawira

Hone Pani Tamati Waka Nene Harawira is a New Zealand Māori activist and former parliamentarian. He was elected to the New Zealand Parliament for the Māori electorate of Te Tai Tokerau in the 2005 general election as the Māori Party candidate. His resignation caused the Te Tai Tokerau by-election, held on 25 June 2011, which he won with a majority of 1,117. As Leader of the Mana Movement and Member of Parliament for Te Tai Tokerau, he sat on the front bench in the New Zealand House of Representatives until losing the seat in the 2014 general election.

Te Tai Tokerau Māori electorate in Northland, New Zealand

Te Tai Tokerau is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate that was created out of the Northern Maori electorate ahead of the first Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) election in 1996. It was held first by Tau Henare representing New Zealand First for one term, and then Dover Samuels of the Labour Party for two terms. From 2005 to 2014, it was held by MP Hone Harawira. Initially a member of the Māori Party, Harawira resigned from both the party and then Parliament, causing the 2011 by-election. He was returned under the Mana Party banner in July 2011 and confirmed at the November 2011 general election. In the 2014 election, he was beaten by Labour's Kelvin Davis, ending the representation of the Mana Party in Parliament.

Kelvin Davis (politician) New Zealand politician

Kelvin Glen Davis is a New Zealand politician and a member of the House of Representatives who has served as Deputy Leader of the Labour Party since 1 August 2017.

2014 New Zealand general election

The 2014 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 20 September 2014 to determine the membership of the 51st New Zealand Parliament.

The Mana Movement, formerly known as the Mana Party, is a New Zealand political party led by Hone Harawira which was formed in April 2011 following his resignation from the Māori Party. Harawira won the by-election in Te Tai Tokerau of 25 June 2011 for the Mana Party and retained the seat during the 2011 general election, but lost it in 2014 and 2017 to Labour Party candidate Kelvin Davis.

2011 Te Tai Tokerau by-election New Zealand by-election

The 2011 Te Tai Tokerau by-election was a by-election in the New Zealand electorate of Te Tai Tokerau that was caused by Hone Harawira's resignation from the seat. He chose to re-contest it with the Mana Party in order to seek a new mandate for his views. After generating several days of media interest and criticism Harawira announced on 4 May 2011 that he was delaying his resignation in order to consult his supporters in his electorate. On 11 May 2011 Harawira wrote to the Speaker of the House to resign from Parliament, with effect from 20 May 2011. On 12 May 2011 the Prime Minister John Key announced that the by-election would be held on 25 June.

New Conservative is a political party in New Zealand. Observers describe the party's policies as far-right, though the party itself disputes this. It advocates for lower taxation, anti-abortion measures, protection of freedom of speech, prison labour, gun rights and austerity cuts.

Internet Party (New Zealand) Political party in New Zealand

The Internet Party was a registered political party in New Zealand that promoted Internet freedom and privacy. The party was founded in January 2014 with the financial support and promotion of internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom, and was first led by former Alliance MP Laila Harré, then by citizen journalist Suzie Dawson.

Todd Muller New Zealand politician

Todd Michael Muller is a New Zealand politician who served as the Leader of the New Zealand National Party and the Leader of the Opposition from 22 May to 14 July 2020. He entered Parliament at the 2014 general election as the MP for Bay of Plenty. On 23 June 2021, Muller announced he would be retiring at the next New Zealand general election.

The New Zealand Outdoors Party is a registered political party in New Zealand. The party is led by co-leaders Alan Simmons and Sue Grey and seeks to protect New Zealand's environment and "outdoors heritage."

2020 New Zealand general election New Zealand general election in October 2020

The 2020 New Zealand general election was held on Saturday 17 October 2020 to determine the composition of the 53rd parliament. Voters elected 120 members to the House of Representatives, 72 from single-member electorates and 48 from closed party lists. Two referendums, one on the personal use of cannabis and one on euthanasia, were also held on the same day. Official results of the election and referendums were released on 6 November.

Leighton Baker New Zealand politician

Leighton James Baker is a New Zealand politician who was leader of the New Conservative Party from 2017 to 2020. He has contested every general election since 2008, initially for The Kiwi Party, as well as a by-election, but has not been elected to office. Baker is also a businessman, owning a Rangiora-based construction firm.

Elliot Ikilei New Zealand politician

Elliot Ewen Pasione Ikilei is a New Zealand politician. He is a member of the New Conservative Party and has contested two general elections without success. He was the New Conservative Party's deputy leader from 2017 to 2020, and as its leader for six weeks in 2020 before announcing on 31 December that he had resigned the leadership.

Next New Zealand general election

The next New Zealand general election to determine the composition of the 54th Parliament will be held after the currently elected 53rd Parliament is dissolved or expires.

Candidates in the 2020 New Zealand general election by electorate Wikipedia list article

This page lists candidates contesting electorates in the 2020 New Zealand general election.

Advance New Zealand Political party in New Zealand

The Advance New Zealand Party is a political party in New Zealand led by Jami-Lee Ross. The idea was first unveiled in a newsletter from Ross released in April 2020. He claims the party is a centrist and anti-corruption movement designed to appeal to voters "in the middle"; however, their main policies represent the political fringe rather than centre.

The New Zealand TEA Party is a registered political party in New Zealand. The party is led by John Hong. The party contested the 2020 general election, but did not win any seats.

Neru Leavasa New Zealand Labour Party politician

Neru Asi Tuiataga Leavasa is a New Zealand politician. He was elected as a Member of Parliament in the House of Representatives for the Labour Party in 2020.

William Desmond Te Kahika Junior, also known as Billy TK Junior, is a New Zealand conspiracy theorist, blues musician and guitarist, businessman and former political candidate. During the 2020 New Zealand general election, Te Kahika attracted media coverage both as the leader of the fringe New Zealand Public Party and for his promulgation of conspiracy theories. Both Te Kahika and the Public Party opposed the New Zealand Government's lockdown restrictions in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Te Kahika, who lives in Whangārei, is the son of Māori musician Billy TK.

The Attica Project is an unregistered political party in New Zealand.

References

  1. 1 2 "Application to Register Political Party and Logo". Electoral Commission. 5 June 2020. Retrieved 6 June 2020.
  2. Braae, Alex (18 August 2020). "A revelation in Marton: The Spinoff meets New Zealand's newest Christian party". Politics. The Spinoff. Retrieved 10 October 2020. One Party is adamant that New Zealand is a Christian nation, and should be run as such.
  3. "Abortion – One Party" . Retrieved 2 January 2021.
  4. "Euthanasia – One Party" . Retrieved 2 January 2021.
  5. "ONE PARTY LIMITED (7716016) Registered". app.companiesoffice.govt.nz. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  6. Braae, Alex (18 August 2020). "A revelation in Marton: The Spinoff meets New Zealand's newest Christian party". The Spinoff. The Spinoff. Retrieved 24 January 2021. The party's structure reflects the belief that God should be above politicians. The political wing would provide MPs to parliament if they get elected. But on policy and legislative questions, they would be held to account by an Apostolic Council of religious leaders from various faiths and cultural backgrounds.
  7. Braae, Alex (18 August 2020). "A revelation in Marton: The Spinoff meets New Zealand's newest Christian party". The Spinoff. The Spinoff. Retrieved 24 January 2021. In a cultural sense, the party leans towards the more pentecostal and evangelical end of the spectrum. There’s also a strong flavour of charismatic Christianity, with an emphasis on powerful oratory and a belief in the miraculous.
  8. Braae, Alex (18 August 2020). "A revelation in Marton: The Spinoff meets New Zealand's newest Christian party". The Spinoff. The Spinoff. Retrieved 24 January 2021. 'We didn't come together as Baptists, as Anglicans or Methodists. We came together just as people, who love the Lord.'
  9. Braae, Alex (18 August 2020). "A revelation in Marton: The Spinoff meets New Zealand's newest Christian party". The Spinoff. The Spinoff. Retrieved 24 January 2021. The concept of prophecy is deeply important to the politics of those running for the One Party. Candidates don’t speak of deciding to become politicians – they say they are given some sort of sign or message that it is their destiny.
  10. Braae, Alex (18 August 2020). "A revelation in Marton: The Spinoff meets New Zealand's newest Christian party". The Spinoff. The Spinoff. Retrieved 24 January 2021. 'And the lord said to me, get your name off it! There will be only one name, and it is the name this government dislikes. And you will go through this nation and lift up one name – Ihu Karaiti, Jesus Christ. [...]'
  11. "Registration of ONE Party and logo". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 10 July 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2020.
  12. "2020 Broadcasting Allocation Decision Released". Electoral Commission. 29 May 2020. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  13. "Northland news in brief: Christian party launch". The Northern Advocate . 18 June 2020. Archived from the original on 26 June 2020. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  14. "One Party". Facebook . Retrieved 30 June 2020.
  15. "New political party combines Te Tiriti and the Bible into One". Te Ao - Māori News. 10 August 2020. Archived from the original on 17 August 2020. Retrieved 13 August 2020.
  16. 1 2 Braae, Alex (18 August 2020). "A revelation in Marton: The Spinoff meets New Zealand's newest Christian party". The Spinoff. Retrieved 18 August 2020.
  17. "2020 General Election and Referendums - Official Result". Electoral Commission.