The Opportunities Party

Last updated

The Opportunities Party
AbbreviationTOP
Leader Geoff Simmons
Founder Gareth Morgan
Founded4 November 2016
Ideology Radical centrism [1]
Environmentalism [1]
Political position Radical centre [2]
Slogan"Vote Different"
House of Representatives
0 / 120
Website
www.top.org.nz OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

The Opportunities Party (TOP) is a political party in New Zealand. It was founded by economist and philanthropist Gareth Morgan in November 2016. The party supports "a prosperous, fair and equitable society", tax reform, stricter immigration, environmental sustainability, a written constitution, the adoption of a universal basic income for adults 18-23, families with children under 3 and everyone over 65, and the legalisation and taxation of cannabis. Gareth Morgan also announced he wanted to reduce the prison population by 40%. During the 2017 general election, TOP gained 2.4% of the vote and won no seats in the New Zealand House of Representatives. [3]

Contents

In December 2017, three months after the election, Morgan resigned as leader and the party's deputy leader Geoff Simmons and two candidates also stepped down from their roles. Morgan said the party would contest the 2020 election but he would not lead it. [4]

In July 2018 the party announced that it had asked the Electoral Commission to de-register it, as it did not plan to contest the 2020 election. [5] [6] In late July 2018, the party's board suspended their plans to de-register the party while it considered expressions of interests from a number of people sympathetic to the party's policies. [7] [8]

On 31 March 2019, Gareth Morgan resigned from all remaining positions he held with the party, quitting it entirely. [9]

Policies and principles

TOP lists its policies on the party website. In summary, these include:

History

Foundation

Morgan launched the party on 4 November 2016 outside Parliament House in Wellington. On 10 January 2017 the party announced that it had 2000 members and was applying for registration. It also announced that it was considering standing electorate candidates. [21] [22] The Electoral Commission posted notice of the registration application on 21 January. [23]

The party announced that then party chief of staff Geoff Simmons would contest the Mount Albert by-election on 25 February 2017. [24] During the by-election the party was criticised by David Seymour for offering free rides for Mount Albert voters, which he asserted breached the Electoral Act. [25] However, the Electoral Commission cleared TOP of any wrongdoing. [26] Simmons initially received 600 votes, or 4.6% of the vote. [27] After counting special votes, Simmons officially received 623 votes, with 4.56% of the total vote, placing him third. [28]

2017 general election

The party was registered by the electoral commission on 6 March 2017. [29] On 24 May 2017, Gareth Morgan announced the party's first four electoral and list candidates for the general election on 23 September 2017. They were Geoff Simmons who would be the deputy leader of the party and would be standing in Wellington Central, Lesley Immink standing in East Coast, Jessica Hammond Doube standing in Ōhāriu and Jenny Condie as a list candidate and TOP's Tax Spokesperson. [30] TOP announced three more candidates on 1 June 2017 – Nicky Snoyink standing in Selwyn, Olly Wilson standing in Rangitata, and Kevin Neill standing in Waitaki. [31] In mid-June 2017, it was announced that artist Mika Haka would stand in Auckland Central. [32] [33] On 28 August 2017, it was announced that former Green Party candidate Teresa Moore (standing in East Coast Bays) would join Geoff Simmons as co-deputy leader. [34] [35] In total, the party ran 21 electoral candidates and 26 party list candidates. [36]

During the 2017 general election, TOP gained 2.4% of the vote and won no seats in the New Zealand House of Representatives. [3] Party leader Gareth Morgan vowed to continue fighting for a "fairer New Zealand" and maintained that TOP was not a failure since it was the fifth most popular party based on the provisional results. [37]

Post election developments

In December 2017, three months after the election, Morgan resigned as leader and the party's deputy leader Geoff Simmons and two candidates also stepped down from their roles. Morgan said the party would contest the 2020 election but he would not lead it. [38]

In the week that followed the resignations, the two candidates, Ōhāriu candidate Jessica Hammond Doube and list candidate Jenny Condie announced the launching of a splinter group from TOP with the placeholder name "Next Big Thing". Both candidates attributed their low list rankings to their having raised questions over Morgan's controversial remarks during the election campaign. [39]

On 9 July 2018, Morgan announced that the Board of The Opportunities Party had decided to cancel the party's registration since the party lacked the time and resources to contest the 2020 general election. [5] [6] In late July, Morgan and the party's board announced that he would reconsider his decision to cancel the party's registration after receiving expressions of interest from people sympathetic to the party's goals. Morgan also indicated in a Facebook post that he was willing to fund candidates and leaders sympathetic to the goals of The Opportunities Party. [7] [8]

In August 2018, The Opportunities Party appointed a new board and Geoff Simmons was appointed interim leader. The new team embarked on a "Listening Tour" [40] across the country to gauge supporter reaction and future interest.

An internal leadership election was run by blockchain election company Horizon State. The candidates for leader included Geoff Simmons, Donna Pokere-Phillips, Amy Stevens, Anthony Singh, and Jessica Hammond-Doube. An election was also held for member-representative to the Board. On 8 December 2018, the board announced that Geoff Simmons had been elected [41] and that Donna Pokere-Phillips had won the race for Member Representative. [42]

The first logo for the Opportunities Party, a variant on Wa kainga. Logo of The Opportunities Party.svg
The first logo for the Opportunities Party, a variant on Wā kāinga.
The second logo for the Opportunities Party, used during the 2017 election, with the full name underneath. TOP logo 2017.svg
The second logo for the Opportunities Party, used during the 2017 election, with the full name underneath.

The party has used three different logos since its creation.

The party initially used a variant of the Wā kāinga / Home flag as its logo. In a November 2016 blog post, Gareth Morgan noted it had won the Morgan Foundation's flag competition in 2016 and that it symbolised "the transition we currently have underway in Aotearoa". [43] The creators of the Red Peak flag criticised the party for using a logo similar to their flag without discussing it with them. [44] The party attempted to register this as their logo in January 2017 at the same time as the party; [23] the party was registered in March 2017 but the logo was not.

The party then changed to a logo consisting of the letters, T, O, and P in black, red, and dark blue respectively. The party applied to register this with the Electoral Commission in April 2017 [45] and it was approved in May 2017. [46] As of October 2019, this remains the party's officially registered logo.

In October 2019, the party updated its website, including a new logo. This logo shows a T, O, P, and full stop; the T and P are in black and the O and full stop are the same colour, though that colour varies from use to use. The logo appears with a slogan "Vote Different", in a typewriter font. [47]

Electoral results

General elections

ElectionCandidates nominatedSeats wonVotesVote share %Government
ElectorateList
2017 2126
0 / 120
63,2612.4%Not In Parliament

Office-holders

Leader

NamePortraitAssumed OfficeLeft OfficeNotes
1 Gareth Morgan Gareth Morgan (cropped).jpg 4 November 201614 December 2017party founder
2 Geoff Simmons Geoff pic.jpg 18 August 2018

Deputy Leader

Office HolderAssumed OfficeLeft OfficeNotes
1Geoff Simmons24 May 201714 December 2017
2Teresa Moore28 August 20179 July 2018appointed co-deputy leader

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References

  1. 1 2 "Vision". TOP. Retrieved 9 September 2017.
  2. Mt Albert by-election to test how palatable The Opportunities Party's 'radical centrism' will be in the general election; Geoff Simmons explains why 'it's time for something fresh'. Interest.co.nz. Author - Jenée Tibshraeny. Published 10 February 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2017.
  3. 1 2 "2017 General Election - Official Result". New Zealand Electoral Commission . Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  4. "TOP loses leader Gareth Morgan and three other candidates in matter of hours". Stuff.co.nz. 14 December 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2017.
  5. 1 2 Lee, Julian (9 July 2018). "Gareth Morgan's The Opportunities Party is over". Stuff.co.nz . Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  6. 1 2 "The Opportunities Party Will Not Contest 2020". The Opportunities Party. 9 July 2018. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  7. 1 2 Bennett, Lucy (30 July 2018). "The Opportunities Party puts deregistration on hold after new interest". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  8. 1 2 "The Opportunities Party won't deregister, will make comeback with new leader". Newshub. 29 July 2018. Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  9. "Gareth Morgan leaves the political party he founded". Stuff.co.nz. 31 March 2019. Retrieved 29 March 2019.
  10. Cantin, John; Elwela, Darshana (15 December 2016). "The Opportunities Party asset tax policy released" (PDF). TaxMail. KPMG. Retrieved 20 August 2017.
  11. "TOP1 - Tax reform". TOP. Retrieved 13 August 2017.
  12. "TOP2 - Smarter Immigration". TOP. Retrieved 31 May 2017.
  13. "TOP3 - Our Environment". TOP. Retrieved 31 May 2017.
  14. "TOP4 - Democracy Reset". TOP. Retrieved 31 May 2017.
  15. "TOP6 - Climate Change Action". TOP. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  16. "TOP5 - Education Reform". TOP. Retrieved 31 May 2017.
  17. https://www.top.org.nz/youthunconditionalbasicincome
  18. "TOP7 - Thriving Families and UBI". TOP. Retrieved 31 May 2017.
  19. "The Real Deal Cannabis Reform". TOP. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  20. Positive justice
  21. "The Opportunities Party to Register". The Opportunities Party. 10 January 2017. Archived from the original on 6 April 2017. Retrieved 10 January 2017.
  22. Sachdeva, Sam (10 January 2017). "Gareth Morgan registers political party to prepare for potential early election". Stuff. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  23. 1 2 "Registration of The Opportunities Party (TOP) and Logo". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 21 January 2017.
  24. Sachdeva, Sam (1 February 2017). "Gareth Morgan's party to take on Jacinda Ardern in Mt Albert by-election". Stuff. Retrieved 1 February 2017.
  25. "ACT Party says TOP's offer of free bus rides to voters breaks the law". Stuff. 17 February 2017. Retrieved 18 February 2017.
  26. "The Opportunities Party cleared of 'treating' after giving free rides to voters". Stuff. 21 February 2017. Retrieved 21 February 2017.
  27. "Landslide win for Jacinda Ardern in Mt Albert by-election". New Zealand Herald. 25 February 2017. ISSN   1170-0777 . Retrieved 25 February 2017.
  28. "Mt Albert - Official Result". www.electionresults.govt.nz. Retrieved 27 November 2019.
  29. http://www.elections.org.nz/news-media/registration-opportunities-party-top
  30. "Gareth Morgan Announces The Opportunities Party (TOP) First Set of Candidates". TOP. Retrieved 31 May 2017.
  31. "Gareth Morgan Announces The Opportunities Party (TOP) Second Set of Candidates". TOP. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  32. Jones, Nicholas (15 June 2017). "Mika to stand in Auckland Central for Gareth Morgan's new party". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  33. "Mika Haka". TOP. Retrieved 6 July 2017.
  34. "Teresa Moore". TOP. Retrieved 9 September 2017.
  35. "Gareth Morgan adds new deputy co-leader of TOP, releases party list". Stuff. 28 August 2017. Retrieved 9 September 2017.
  36. "Party and candidate lists for 2017 Election". New Zealand Electoral Commission . Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  37. Swinnen, Lucy (24 September 2017). "Party 'for a fairer New Zealand' falls flat, as Gareth Morgan's TOP falls far short of 5 per cent". Stuff.co.nz . Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  38. "TOP loses leader Gareth Morgan and three other candidates in matter of hours". Stuff.co.nz. 14 December 2017. Retrieved 14 December 2017.
  39. Cooke, Henry (19 December 2017). "Ex-TOP candidates start new political action group". Stuff.co.nz . Retrieved 19 December 2017.
  40. November 21, The Opportunities Party 0sc on; 2018. "The Listening Tour: Workshop Results". TOP. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  41. "Parliamentary Leader Results" (PDF). d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  42. "Member Representative Results" (PDF). d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  43. Morgan, Gareth (6 November 2016). "Why I chose this for The Opportunities Party logo and what it means". TOP. Archived from the original on 13 April 2017. Retrieved 12 April 2017.
  44. Sachdeva, Sam (4 November 2016). "Explainer: Why is Gareth Morgan entering politics, and what are his chances?". Stuff. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
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  47. "TOP". TOP. Retrieved 6 October 2019.