One cent coin (Netherlands)

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1 Cent 1948.jpg
1 Cent 1952.jpg
Reverse and obverse 1-cent coin 1948 and 1952.

The one-cent coin was a coin struck in the Kingdom of the Netherlands between 1817 and 1980. The coin was worth 1 cent or 1100 of a Dutch guilder.

Contents

Dimensions and weight

Specifications1 cent 1817–18771 cent 1877–19411 cent 1941–19441 cent 1948–1980Refs
Gram 3.85 g (1817–1837)
3.9 g (1860–1877)
2.5 g (1877–1901)
2.6 g (1913–1941)
2 g1.9 g (1948)
2 mm (1950–1980)
[1]
Diameter 22 mm19 mm17 mm17.1 mm
Thickness1 mm1 mm1.5 mm1.2 mm (1948)
1.3 mm (1950–1980)
Metal Copper Bronze Zinc Bronze

Versions

Monarch MintMaterialObverseReverseEdgeMinting yearsRefs
William I Utrecht and Brussels Copper Crowned W between the mint yearCrowned Dutch coat of arms
between value
Smooth with no
edge lettering
1817–1819(U)
1821–1824(U and B)
1826–1828(U and B)
1830(U)
1831(U)
1837(U)
[2]
William III UtrechtCopperCrowned W between the mint yearCrowned Dutch coat of arms
between value
Smooth with no
edge lettering
1860–1864
1870
1873
1875–1877
William IIIUtrecht Bronze Crowned lion with sword and quiver Value between two
bonded orange branches
Reeded with no
edge lettering
1877
1878
1880–1884
Wilhelmina UtrechtBronzeCrowned lion with sword and quiverValue between two
bonded orange branches
Reeded with no
edge lettering
1892
1896–1901
WilhelminaUtrechtBronzeCrowned lion with sword and quiver (smaller mint and mint master mark
and lion manes longer)
Value between two
bonded orange branches
Reeded with no
edge lettering
1902
1904–1907
WilhelminaUtrecht and Philadelphia BronzeCrowned lion with sword and quiver (different crown and bigger lettering)Value between two
bonded orange branches
(different orange branches
and bigger lettering)
Reeded with no
edge lettering
1913–1922(U)
1924–1931(U)
1937–1941(U)
1942(P)
1943(P)
German occupation coin [n 1] Utrecht Zinc Strait cross with ribbon displaying ‘Nederland’Value with four waves
and a cereal ear
Reeded with no
edge lettering
1941–1944
WilhelminaUtrechtBronzeQueens head to the leftValueSmooth with no
edge lettering
1948
Juliana UtrechtBronzeQueens head to the rightValueSmooth with no
edge lettering
1950–1980

Notes

  1. The 1 cent coin made in the Netherlands during World War II was made of zinc, and worth 1100, or 0.01, of the Dutch guilder. It was designed by Nico de Haas, a Dutch national-socialist. The respective mintage was of 31,800,000 (1941), 241,000,000 (1942), 71,000,000 (1943), and 29,600,000 (1944).

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References

  1. "numista.com". Numista. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  2. "nomisma.nl" . Retrieved 17 May 2014.