Twenty-five cent coin (Netherlands)

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25 Cent, 1948 25 cent 1948.jpg
25 Cent, 1948
25 Cent, 1955 25 cent 1955.jpg
25 Cent, 1955
25 Cent, 2000 25 cent 2000.jpg
25 Cent, 2000
Obverse 1 cent, 1941. 25 cent 1941(zink) achter 300.JPG
Obverse 1 cent, 1941.
Reverse 1 cent, 1941. 25 cent 1941(zink) voor 300.JPG
Reverse 1 cent, 1941.

The twenty-five cent was a coin worth a quarter of decimal Dutch guilder. It was used from the decimalisation of the currency in 1817 until the Netherlands adopted the euro as sole currency in 2002. The last minting was in 2002. The coin was the third-smallest denomination of the guilder when the currency was withdrawn, and the largest of a value less than one guilder.

Guilder monetary unit

Guilder is the English translation of the Dutch and German gulden, originally shortened from Middle High German guldin pfenninc "gold penny". This was the term that became current in the southern and western parts of the Holy Roman Empire for the Fiorino d'oro. Hence, the name has often been interchangeable with florin.

Euro European currency

The euro is the official currency of 19 of the 28 member states of the European Union. This group of states is known as the eurozone or euro area, and counts about 343 million citizens as of 2019. The euro is the second largest and second most traded currency in the foreign exchange market after the United States dollar. The euro is subdivided into 100 cents.

Contents

At first, the coin was minted with a layer of silver alloy. During the reign of King William III of the Netherlands the coin became smaller from 1877 onwards. The new size of the coin would be the final size, except during the German occupation of the Netherlands, when the coin was much bigger.

William III of the Netherlands King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg 1849 - 1890

William III was King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg from 1849 until his death in 1890. He was also the Duke of Limburg from 1849 until the abolition of the duchy in 1866.

From 1948 onwards, the coin was minted using nickel. Its last design originated from 1980, with Queen Beatrix as the monarch on its obverse.

It was nicknamed the kwartje. The nickname came from the Dutch word for a quarter (kwart), and the diminutive suffix -je (similar to the English -ie).

Dutch language West Germanic language

Dutch(Nederlands ) is a West Germanic language spoken by around 23 million people as a first language and 5 million people as a second language, constituting the majority of people in the Netherlands and Belgium. It is the third most widely spoken Germanic language, after its close relatives English and German.

Dimensions and weight

25 cent 1817-183025 cent 1848-194525 cent 1941-194325 cent 1948-2001
Gram 4.23  gram3.58  gram5  gram3  gram
Diameter 21  mm19  mm26  mm18.5  mm (1948)
19  mm (1950-2001)
Thickness1.4  mm1.44  mm (1898-1906)
1.38  mm (1910-1925)
1.5  mm1.32  mm (1948)
1.61  mm (1950-1980)
1.55  mm (1982-2001)
Metal Silver .569Silver .640 Zinc Nickel

Source [1] [2]

Versions during the kingdom of the Netherlands

Monarch MintMaterialObverseReverseEdgeMinting years
William I Utrecht and Brussels Silver Crowned W between the mint yearCrowned Dutch coat of arms between valueSmooth with no edge lettering1817-1819(U), 1822(U), 1823(B), 1824(B), 1825(U and B), 1826(U and B), 1827(B), 1828(B), 1829(U and B), 1830(U and B)
William II UtrechtSilverKings bust to the leftValue and mint year between two bonded oak branches Reeded with no edge lettering1848, 1849
William III UtrechtSilverKings bust to the rightValue and mint year between two bonded oak branchesReeded with no edge lettering1849, 1850, 1853, 1887, 1889, 1890
Wilhelmina UtrechtSilverQueens bust to the left with loose hairValue and mint year between two bonded oak branchesReeded with no edge lettering1891-1897
WilhelminaUtrechtSilverQueens head with diadem to the leftValue and mint year between two bonded oak branchesReeded with no edge lettering1898, 1901-1906
WilhelminaUtrechtSilverQueens bust with stoat cloak to the leftValue and mint year between two bonded oak branchesReeded with no edge lettering1910-1919, 1925
WilhelminaUtrecht and Philadelphia SilverQueens head to the leftValue and mint year between two bonded oak branchesReeded with no edge lettering1926(U), 1928(U), 1939(U), 1940(U), 1941(U and P), 1943-1945(P)
German occupation coin Utrecht Zinc Stylized sailing ship Value and mint year between two twigsSmooth with no edge lettering1941-1943
WilhelminaUtrecht Nickel Queens head to the leftValue and mint year under a crownReeded with no edge lettering1948
Juliana UtrechtNickelQueens head to the rightValue and mint year under a crownReeded with no edge lettering1950, 1951, 1954-1958, 1960-1980
Beatrix UtrechtNickelHalf Queens head to the leftValue with interrupted rectangular planesReeded with no edge lettering1982-2001
Discontinued due to introduction of the euro.

Source [3]

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References

  1. "numista.com" . Retrieved 2014-05-20.
  2. "numista.com". Numista. Retrieved 2014-05-20.
  3. "nomisma.nl" . Retrieved 2014-05-17.

Obverses and reverses