Dutch euro coins

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Dutch euro coins currently use two designs by Erwin Olaf, both of which feature a portrait of King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands. The new designs began circulating in 2014. [1] Dutch Euro coins minted from 1999 to 2013 feature a portrait of Queen Beatrix designed by Bruno Ninaber van Eyben. All coins share the 12 stars of the EU and the year of imprint in their design.

Contents

This coin comes from the second series, with king Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands 2 euro coin Netherlands series2.gif
This coin comes from the second series, with king Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands

As is the case in Finland, most Dutch shops have elected not to issue one and two cent coins starting on September 1, 2004, though the coins remain legal tender. Sums are rounded to the nearest five cents; sums ending in 1, 2, 6 or 7 cents are rounded down, and those ending in 3, 4, 8 or 9 cents are rounded up. The rounding is applied to the grand total only, while individual prices are still shown and summed up with €0.01 precision. This method is known as "Swedish rounding".

Dutch euro design

For images of the common side and a detailed description of the coins, see euro coins.

First series (1999–2013): Queen Beatrix

Depiction of Dutch euro coinage | Obverse side
€ 0.01€ 0.02€ 0.05
5 cent euro coin Netherlands series1.gif 5 cent euro coin Netherlands series1.gif 5 cent euro coin Netherlands series1.gif
Portrait of Queen Beatrix, her title around the edge.
€ 0.10€ 0.20€ 0.50
50 cent euro coin Netherlands series1.gif 20 cent euro coins Netherlands series 1.gif 50 cent euro coin Netherlands series1.gif
Portrait of Queen Beatrix, her title around the edge.
€ 1.00€ 2.00€ 2 Coin Edge
1 euro coin Netherlands series 1.gif 2 euro coin Netherlands, first series.gif The edge lettering features the words GOD * ZIJ * MET * ONS (God Be With Us). The same lettering had been applied to the larger guilder coins.
Half portrait of Queen Beatrix, her title vertically shown as in the former guilder.

Second series (2014–present): King Willem Alexander

Following the accession to the throne of King Willem-Alexander, a new series of euro coins was issued depicting the effigy of the new Head of State.

Depiction of Dutch euro coinage | Obverse side
€ 0.01€ 0.02€ 0.05
5 cent coin Netherlands series2.gif 5 cent coin Netherlands series2.gif 5 cent coin Netherlands series2.gif
Portrait of King Willem-Alexander, his title vertical across the coins center.
€ 0.10€ 0.20€ 0.50
50 cent coin Netherlands series2.gif 20 cent euro coin Netherlands series2.gif 50 cent coin Netherlands series2.gif
Portrait of King Willem-Alexander, his title vertical across the coins center.
€ 1.00€ 2.00€ 2 Coin Edge
1 euro coin Netherlands series2.gif 2 euro coin Netherlands series2.gif The edge lettering features the words GOD * ZIJ * MET * ONS (God Be With Us). The same lettering had been applied to the larger guilder coins.
Portrait of King Willem-Alexander, his title shown vertical on the right side.

Circulating Mintage quantities

Face Value [2] [3] €0.01€0.02€0.05€0.10€0.20€0.50€1.00€2.00
199947,800,000109,000,000213,000,000149,700,00086,500,00099,600,00063,500,0009,900,000
2000276,800,000122,000,000184,200,000156,700,00067,500,00087,000,00062,800,00024,400,000
2001179,300,000145,800,000205,900,000193,500,00097,600,00094,500,00067,900,000140,500,000
2002800,00053,100,000900,000800,00051,200,00080,900,00020,100,00037,200,000
200358,100,000151,200,0001,400,0001,200,00058,200,0001,200,0001,400,0001,200,000
2004113,900,000115,700,000400,000400,00020,500,000300,000300,000300,000
2005400,000400,00080,400,000300,000300,000300,000200,000200,000
2006200,000200,00060,100,000100,000100,000100,000100,000100,000
2007200,000200,00078,600,000200,000200,000200,000100,000100,000
2008413,000413,00050,413,000363,000363,000363,000288,000288,000
2009254,000249,00040,299,000209,000209,000209,000149,000149,000
2010235,000235,00070,235,000202,000202,000202,000166,000166,000
2011300,000300,00020,300,000200,000200,000200,000200,0003,900,000
2012400,000200,00010,500,000200,000200,000200,0003,700,000200,000
2013200,000200,00026,200,000200,000200,000200,000200,00010,800,000
2014****************
2015****************

* No coins were minted that year for that denomination
** Data not available yet
*** Small quantities minted for sets only

Changes to national sides

The Commission of the European Communities issued a recommendation on 19 December 2008, a common guideline for the national sides and the issuance of euro coins intended for circulation. One section of this recommendation stipulates that:

Article 4. Design of the national sides:
"The national side of the euro coins intended for circulation should bear the 12 European stars that should fully surround the national design, including the year mark and the indication of the issuing Member State's name. The European stars should be depicted as on the European flag."

The first series of the Dutch euro coins did not comply with this recommendation. No efforts were made to amend these coins to make them compliant.

King Willem Alexander

Queen Beatrix abdicated on 30 April 2013, so the design of the coins was changed for her heir, King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands. The new coins were made to be in accordance with this recommendation. The Royal Dutch Mint presented the new design to the public on 31 October 2013 and began releasing them into circulation in early 2014.(see ). Production of the new coins commenced on 22 January 2014. The first coins were released into circulation the next day. [1]

€2 commemorative coins

YearFeatureVolumeNote
200750th Anniversary of the Signature of the Treaty of Rome 6,333,000 [4] commonly issued coin
2009Ten years of Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) and the birth of the euro 5,300,000 [5] commonly issued coin
2011500th Anniversary of the Publication of The Praise of Folly by Desiderius Erasmus 4,000,000 [6]
201210th Anniversary of Euro coins and banknotes 3,500,000 [7] commonly issued coin
2013Coronation of King Willem-Alexander7,200,000 [6]
2013200 years Kingdom of the Netherlands3,500,000 [8]
2014Kings double portrait5,000,000 [9]

Other commemorative coins (Collectors' coins)

See also

Related Research Articles

There are eight euro coin denominations, ranging from one cent to two euros. The coins first came into use in 2002. They have a common reverse, portraying a map of Europe, but each country in the eurozone has its own design on the obverse, which means that each coin has a variety of different designs in circulation at once. Four European microstates which use the euro as their currency also have the right to mint coins with their own designs on the obverse side.

Belgian euro coins feature only a single design for all eight coins: the portrait or effigy of the incumbent King of the Belgians. Previously, all Belgian euros depicted King Albert II and his royal monogram. Current coins depict King Philippe. Also part of the design by Jan Alfons Keustermans are the 12 stars of the EU and the year of imprint.

Spanish euro coins feature three different designs for each of the three series of coins. The minor series of 1, 2 and 5 cent coins were designed by Garcilaso Rollán, the middle series of 10, 20, and 50 cent coins by Begoña Castellanos and the two major coins feature the portrait or effigy of King Felipe VI of Spain. All designs feature the 12 stars of the EU, the year of minting, and the word España.

Irish euro coins

Irish euro coins all share the same design by Jarlath Hayes, that of the harp, a traditional symbol for Ireland since the Middle Ages, based on that of the Brian Boru harp, housed in Trinity College, Dublin. The same harp is used as on the official seals of the Taoiseach, and government ministers and the Seal of the President of Ireland. The coins' design also features the 12 stars of the EU, the year of issue and the Irish name for Ireland, "Éire", in a traditional Gaelic script.

Finnish euro coins

Finnish euro coins feature three designs. Heikki Häiväoja provided the design for the 1 cent – 50 cent coins, Pertti Mäkinen provided the design for the 1 euro coin, and Raimo Heino provided the design for the 2 euro coin, which shows cloudberry, the golden berry of northern Finland. All designs feature the 12 stars of the EU and the year of imprint.

Vatican euro coins

Vatican euro coins are issued by the Philatelic and Numismatic Office of the Vatican City State and minted by Istituto Poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato (IPZS), in Rome, Italy. The euro is the official currency of the Vatican City, although the Vatican is not a member of the Eurozone or the European Union.

Estonian euro coins

Estonian euro coins feature a single design for all eight coins. This is a design by Lembit Lõhmus and features a silhouette map of Estonia together with the word Eesti (Estonia) and twelve stars, symbolic of the European Union, surrounding the map. This was the winning design in a public vote of ten announced in December 2004.

Slovenian euro coins were first issued for circulation on 1 January 2007 and a unique feature is designed for each coin. The design of approximately 230 million Slovenian euro coins was unveiled on 7 October 2005. The designers were Miljenko Licul, Maja Licul and Janez Boljka. The Mint of Finland was chosen to mint the coins through an international tender in 2007.

The Dutch guilder or fl. was the currency of the Netherlands from the 17th century until 2002, when it was replaced by the euro. Between 1999 and 2002, the guilder was officially a "national subunit" of the euro. However, physical payments could only be made in guilders, as no euro coins or banknotes were available. The Netherlands Antillean guilder is still in use in Curaçao and Sint Maarten, but this currency is distinct from the Dutch guilder. In 2004, the Surinamese guilder was replaced by the Surinamese dollar.

Netherlands Antillean guilder currency of the former Netherlands Antilles; now in use on Curaçao and Sint Maarten

The Netherlands Antillean guilder is the currency of Curaçao and Sint Maarten, which until 2010 formed the Netherlands Antilles along with Bonaire, Saba, and Sint Eustatius. It is subdivided into 100 cents. The guilder was replaced by the United States dollar on 1 January 2011 on Bonaire, Saba and Sint Eustatius. On Curaçao and Sint Maarten, the Netherlands Antillean guilder was proposed to be replaced by a new currency, the Caribbean guilder, but this has been stalled indefinitely by negotiations over the establishment of a separate central bank for Curaçao.

The florin is the currency of Aruba. It is subdivided into 100 cents. The florin was introduced in 1986, replacing the Netherlands Antillean guilder at par. The Aruban florin is pegged to the United States dollar at the rate of 1.79 florin per USD. US dollars are frequently accepted as payment at the rate of 1.75 florin per USD.

2 euro commemorative coins Wikimedia list article

€2 commemorative coins are special euro coins minted and issued by member states of the eurozone since 2004 as legal tender in all eurozone member states. Only the national obverse sides of the coins differ; the common reverse sides do not. The coins typically commemorate the anniversaries of historical events or draw attention to current events of special importance. In 2007, 2009, 2012 and 2015, there were common commemorative coins with only different national inscriptions. Up to end of 2017, three hundred and two variations of €2 commemorative coins have been minted – six in 2004, eight in 2005, seven in 2006, twenty in 2007, ten in 2008, twenty-five in 2009, twelve in 2010, sixteen in 2011, thirty in 2012, twenty-three in 2013, twenty-six in 2014, forty-seven in 2015, and thirty-two both in 2016 and 2017. Finland, Italy, Luxembourg, San Marino and the Vatican City are the only countries to have released at least one commemorative coin every year since 2004.

1 euro cent coin coin with value of one-hundredth of a euro

The 1 euro cent coin (€0.01) has a value of one hundredth of a euro and is composed of copper-covered steel. The coins of every Euro country have a common reverse and each has a country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as was the case with the higher-value coins.

2 euro cent coin

The 2 euro cent coin (€0.02) has a value of one-fiftieth of a euro and is composed of copper-plated steel. All coins have a common reverse and country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as were the higher-value coins.

5 euro cent coin

The 5 euro cent coin (€0.05) has a value of one twentieth of a euro and is composed of copper-covered steel. All coins have a common reverse and country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not re-designed in 2007 as was the case with the higher-value coins.

10 euro cent coin coin with value of one tenth of a euro

The 10 euro cent coin (€0.10) has a value of one tenth of a euro and is composed of an alloy called Nordic gold. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

Five guilder coin (Netherlands)

The Dutch Five guilder coin was the highest-denomination coin in the Netherlands from its introduction in 1988 until the adoption of the euro in 2002. Its nominal value was ƒ 5,-.

The One guilder coin was a coin struck in the Kingdom of the Netherlands between 1818 and 2001. It remained in circulation until 2002 when the guilder currency was replaced by the euro. No guilder coins were minted in the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II.

Before the introduction of the euro, the current eurozone members issued their own individual national coinage, most of which featured mint marks, privy marks and/or mint master marks. These marks have been continued as a part of the national designs of the euro coins, as well. This article serves to list the information about the various types of identifying marks on euro coins, including engraver and designer initials and the unique edge inscriptions found on the €2 coins.

Andorra and the euro euro coin

Andorra has a monetary agreement with the EU allowing it to make the euro its official currency, and permitting it to issue euro coins from 1 July 2013. They planned to issue their first coins by March or April 2014. On 23 December coins were delivered for pre-booked customers at the Government Administration Building, and actual circulation began on 15 January 2015.

References

  1. 1 2 (in Dutch) Koning Willem-Alexander slaat nieuwe Nederlandse euromunten, Dutch government, 2013. Retrieved on 3 July 2014.
  2. "Circulating Mintage quantities". Henning Agt. Retrieved 2008-08-19.
  3. "Jaarverslag 2013" [Annual Report 2013](PDF) (Portable Document File) (in Dutch). Koninklijke Nederlandse Munt N.V. 16 May 2014: 48. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 2 February 2015.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  4. "2 Euro Treaty of Rome". ibiblio.org. Retrieved 2013-11-25.
  5. "2 Euro 10 Years of EMU". ibiblio.org. Retrieved 2013-11-25.
  6. 1 2 "The Netherlands". ec.europa.eu. Retrieved 2013-11-25.
  7. "Euro Coin Mintage". euro-auflagen.de. Retrieved 2014-08-24.
  8. "The Netherlands". ec.europa.eu. Retrieved 2014-06-06.
  9. "2 euro: The Double Portrait 2014". coin-database.com. Retrieved 2014-08-24.