Two and a half cent coin (Netherlands)

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The Two and a half cent coin was struck in the Kingdom of the Netherlands between 1818 and 1942. All coins were minted in Utrecht.

Netherlands Constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Europe

The Netherlands is a country located mainly in Northwestern Europe. The European portion of the Netherlands consists of twelve separate provinces that border Germany to the east, Belgium to the south, and the North Sea to the northwest, with maritime borders in the North Sea with Belgium, Germany and the United Kingdom. Together with three island territories in the Caribbean Sea—Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba— it forms a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The official language is Dutch, but a secondary official language in the province of Friesland is West Frisian.

Contents

Dimensions and weight

Dimensions2 12 cents 1877–19412 12 cents 1941–1942Refs
Mass4 g2 g [1]
Diameter 23.69 mm (1877–1898)
23.5 mm (1903–1906)
23 mm (1912–1941)
20 mm
Thickness1.1 mm (1903–1906)
1 mm (1912–1941)
? mm
Metal Bronze Zinc

Versions

Monarch MintMaterialObverseReverseEdgeMinting yearsRefs
William III Utrecht Bronze Crowned lion with sword and quiver Value between two
bonded orange branches
Reeded with no
edge lettering
1877, 1880, 1881, 1883, 1884, 1886, 1890 [2]
Wilhelmina UtrechtBronzeCrowned lion with sword and quiver (bigger mint master mark)Value between two
bonded orange branches
Reeded with no
edge lettering
1894, 1898
WilhelminaUtrechtBronzeCrowned lion with sword and quiver (smaller mint and mint master mark)Value between two
bonded orange branches
Reeded with no
edge lettering
1903–1906
WilhelminaUtrechtBronzeCrowned lion with sword and quiver (different crown and bigger lettering)Value between two
bonded orange branches (different orange branches
and bigger lettering)
Reeded with no
edge lettering
1912–1916, 1918, 1919, 1929, 1941
German occupation coin Utrecht Zinc Frisian owl board Value with four waves
and two cereal ears
Smooth with no
edge lettering
1941, 1942

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References

  1. "numista.com". Numista. Retrieved 2014-05-20.
  2. "nomisma.nl" . Retrieved 2014-05-17.