One team in Tallinn

Last updated
One team in Tallinn
Event 1998 FIFA World Cup qualification
Abandoned after three seconds, due to Estonian team boycott.
Match rearranged.
Date9 October 1996
Venue Kadrioru Stadium, Tallinn
Referee Miroslav Radoman (FR Yugoslavia)
Attendance1,000

One team in Tallinn refers to a football match scheduled for 9 October 1996 in World Cup qualifying European Group 4 between the national teams of Estonia and Scotland. The match was abandoned after three seconds because the Estonian team were absent from the Kadrioru Stadium due to a dispute over its floodlights. Scotland expected to be awarded a walkover victory, but FIFA ordered that the match be replayed on neutral territory. The replayed match, staged at the Stade Louis II in Monaco, ended in a goalless draw.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Listed below are the dates and results for the 1998 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds for the European zone (UEFA).

Estonia national football team mens national association football team representing Estonia

The Estonia national football team represents Estonia in international football and is controlled by the Estonian Football Association, the governing body for football in Estonia. Estonia play their home matches at the A. Le Coq Arena in Tallinn, Estonia.

Contents

Background

Estonia and Scotland were drawn in Group 4 along with Austria, Belarus, Latvia and Sweden. Both nations failed to get their campaign off to a winning start in August, Estonia losing 1–0 away to Belarus and Scotland drawing 0–0 away to Austria. On 5 October however, both won their games to leave just one point between the teams heading into the Tallinn meeting.

Austria national football team mens national association football team representing Austria

The Austria national football team is the association football team that represents Austria in international competition and is controlled by the Austrian Football Association . Austria has qualified for seven FIFA World Cups, most recently in 1998. The country played in the UEFA European Championship for the first time in 2008, when it co-hosted the event with Switzerland, and most recently qualified in 2016.

Belarus national football team mens national association football team representing Belarus

Belarus national football team represents Belarus in association football and is controlled by the Football Federation of Belarus, the governing body for football in Belarus. Belarus' home ground is Borisov Arena in Borisov. Belarus has not yet qualified for a FIFA World Cup or UEFA European Championship. Since March 2017 the team is coached by Igor Kriushenko.

Latvia national football team mens national association football team representing Latvia

The Latvia national football team represents the country in international football competitions, such as the World Cup and the European Championships. It is controlled by the Latvian Football Federation, the governing body for football in Latvia. They have never qualified for the World Cup, but they have, however, qualified for the European Championship in 2004, under Aleksandrs Starkovs.

Pre-match controversy

Scotland trained at the Kadrioru Stadium the night before the game, where they found the temporary floodlighting the game was to be played under inadequate and protested to FIFA. [1] After a meeting of the FIFA executive committee the following morning, the scheduled 18:45 EEST kickoff time was brought forward to 15:00 EEST. The Estonian Football Association were unhappy with the logistical consequences of the switch, such as the potential loss of television revenue: [1] BBC Scotland had acquired the rights to show the game in Scotland, but the earlier kickoff conflicted with a live broadcast of the memorial service for the Dunblane massacre that afternoon. The Estonian team refused to change their plans while Scotland prepared for the revised time. [1] Team manager Craig Brown later said he had it in mind that the likeliest occurrence was for the Estonian team to show up late, to protest the decision, but for the game to go ahead anyway. [1]

Eastern European Summer Time daylight savings time zone used in eastern Europe (UTC+3)

Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+03:00 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. It is used as a summer daylight saving time in some European and Middle Eastern countries, which makes it the same as Arabia Standard Time, East Africa Time and Moscow Time. During the winter periods, Eastern European Time (UTC+02:00) is used.

Estonian Football Association sports governing body

The Estonian Football Association is the governing body of football, beach soccer and futsal in Estonia, established on 14 December 1921. It organizes the football league, including the championship which is called Meistriliiga, Estonian Cup and the Estonian national football team. It is based in Tallinn. EJL became a member of FIFA in 1923, but following Estonia's annexation by the Soviet Union it was disbanded. It became a member again in 1992 after Estonia reinstated its independence.

BBC Scotland Scottish division of the British Broadcasting Corporation

BBC Scotland is a division of the BBC and the main public broadcaster in Scotland.

Kick-off and abandonment

Referee Miroslav Radoman led the Scots out onto the pitch, with Scotland's Tartan Army supporters taking the unusual situation in good humour with the chant "One team in Tallinn, There's only one team in Tallinn", to the tune of "Guantanamera". Billy Dodds kicked the game off and captain John Collins took one touch of the ball before Radoman blew the whistle and abandoned the game. [1] After the abandonment, some Scottish supporters played their own game on the Kadrioru Stadium pitch. [2]

Tartan Army

The Tartan Army is a name given to fans of the Scotland national football team. They have won awards from several organisations for their friendly behaviour and charitable work. They have also been criticised at times for aspects of their behaviour, however, such as jeering at God Save the Queen.

"Guantanamera" is perhaps the best known Cuban song and that country's most noted patriotic song, especially when using a poem by the Cuban poet José Martí for the lyrics. The official writing credits have been given to Joseíto Fernández, who first popularized the song on radio as early as 1929. In 1966, a version by American vocal group The Sandpipers, based on an arrangement by The Weavers from their May 1963 Carnegie Hall Reunion concert, became an international hit. It has been recorded by many other solo artists, notably by Willy Chirino, Julio Iglesias, Joan Baez, Albita, Jimmy Buffett, Celia Cruz, Bobby Darin, Raul Malo, Joe Dassin, Muslim Magomayev, José Feliciano, Biser Kirov, Wyclef Jean, Puerto Plata, Trini Lopez, La Lupe, Nana Mouskouri, Tito Puente, Andy Russell, Gloria Estefan, Pete Seeger, Robert Wyatt, and by such groups as The Mavericks, Buena Vista Social Club, Los Lobos, and the Gipsy Kings.

Billy Dodds Scottish footballer

William Dodds is a Scottish professional football player and coach.

The Estonian team arrived at the stadium later in the afternoon, preparing for the original kick-off time. [1] The Scotland team had already left the stadium to begin their journey home. [3]

Estonia  Flag of Estonia.svgvFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Report
Kadriorg Stadium, Tallinn
Attendance: 1,000
Referee: Miroslav Radoman (FR Yugoslavia)
GK Andy Goram (Rangers)
DF Jackie McNamara (Celtic)
DF Tom Boyd (Celtic)
DF Colin Calderwood (Tottenham Hotspur)
DF Tosh McKinlay (Celtic)
MF Craig Burley (Chelsea)
MF Paul Lambert (Borussia Dortmund)
MF John Collins (AS Monaco) (c)
CF John McGinlay (Bolton Wanderers)
CF Billy Dodds (Aberdeen)
CF Darren Jackson (Hibernian)
Manager:
Craig Brown

Aftermath

Scotland initially believed that they would be awarded the match by a default score of 3–0, which appeared to be confirmed by the FIFA match delegate. [1] FIFA regulations stated this should be the case "except in cases of force majeure recognised by the organising committee". [1] A similar situation had occurred in the Soviet Union vs Chile 1974 FIFA World Cup play-off, where the Soviets refused to play in the venue chosen by the Chileans for the match to be played in Chile. [4] In that case Chile were awarded the tie by default and qualified for the 1974 FIFA World Cup. [4] This view was contradicted by Lennart Johansson, who was president of UEFA and a vice-president of FIFA. [1]

<i>Force majeure</i> extraordinary occurrence beyond control

Force majeure – or vis major (Latin) – meaning "superior force", also known as cas fortuit (French) or casus fortuitus (Latin) "chance occurrence, unavoidable accident", is a common clause in contracts that essentially frees both parties from liability or obligation when an extraordinary event or circumstance beyond the control of the parties, such as a war, strike, riot, crime, or an event described by the legal term act of God, prevents one or both parties from fulfilling their obligations under the contract. In practice, most force majeure clauses do not excuse a party's non-performance entirely, but only suspend it for the duration of the force majeure.

1974 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA–CONMEBOL play-off) association football match

The 1973 play-off for a place in the 1974 FIFA World Cup in West Germany, between the national football teams of the Soviet Union and Chile, is notable for the political circumstances that marked the second leg of the play-off on 21 November 1973. It was scheduled to take place in the Estadio Nacional de Chile in Santiago, the Chilean capital. There had been a coup d'état in Chile two months before, immediately after which people deemed undesirable to the new regime of Augusto Pinochet had been held captive and executed in the stadium. The Soviet Union asked FIFA to find a different venue in Chile; when agreement could not be reached, the Soviet team did not take the field and was disqualified from the tournament, giving the Chilean team a victory by walkover. However, the match was still organised by FIFA as normal, but without any away team present. Chile scored 1–0 in an empty goal, and then the referee blew the game off. Chile advanced to the 1974 World Cup, where they were eliminated in the first round.

Estadio Nacional Julio Martínez Prádanos football stadium

Estadio Nacional Julio Martínez Prádanos is the national stadium of Chile, and is located in the Ñuñoa district of Santiago. It is the largest stadium in Chile with an official capacity of 48,665. It is part of a 62 hectare sporting complex which also features tennis courts, an aquatics center, a modern gymnasium, a velodrome, a BMX circuit, and an assistant ground/warmup athletics track.

The FIFA executive committee, chaired by Johansson, met in November. [5] Instead of awarding the match to Scotland, FIFA ordered that the match should be replayed on a neutral ground. [5] This decision was criticised by Scottish observers who believed that Johansson wanted to give Sweden, his native country, the best possible chance of qualification. [5] It also meant that Scotland captain Gary McAllister, who had been suspended for the original fixture against Estonia, was instead suspended for a match against Sweden. [1]

The match was replayed on 11 February 1997 at the Stade Louis II in Monaco and ended in a 0–0 draw. [5] Despite this setback, Scotland finished second in Group 4, two points ahead of Sweden and two points behind group winners Austria, who also had a superior goal difference to Scotland by 1 goal. [5] [6] Their total of 23 points meant that Scotland were the highest-placed runner-up in the European qualifying groups and therefore qualified directly for the World Cup finals. [5] Estonia finished fifth in Group 4 and did not qualify.

Estonia  Flag of Estonia.svg0–0Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Report
Stade Louis II, Monaco
Attendance: 3,766
Referee: Miroslav Radoman (FR Yugoslavia)
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body collarblue.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Estonia
Kit left arm thinwhiteborder.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body collarwhite.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm thinwhiteborder.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Scotland
GK1 Mart Poom (Flora Tallinn) (c)
DF2 Marek Lemsalu (Flora Tallinn)
DF7 Meelis Rooba (Flora Tallinn)Sub off.svg 67'
DF14 Urmas Kirs (Flora Tallinn)
MF8 Liivo Leetma (Flora Tallinn)Sub off.svg 75'
DF4 Sergei Hohlov-Simson (Lelle SK)
DF3 Urmas Rooba (Flora Tallinn)
MF10 Martin Reim (Flora Tallinn)
MF9 Marko Kristal (Flora Tallinn)
CF5 Indrek Zelinski (Flora Tallinn)Yellow card.svg 55'
MF6 Viktor Alonen (Flora Tallinn)Yellow card.svg 31'
Substitutions:
GK Martin Kaalma (Lelle SK)
DF Janek Meet (Flora Tallinn)
DF Raivo Nõmmik (Flora Tallinn)
DF Gert Olesk (Lelle SK)Sub on.svg 75'
MF17 Mati Pari (Lelle SK)Sub on.svg 67'
FW Argo Arbeiter (Lelle SK)
FW11 Andres Oper (Flora Tallinn)Sub on.svg 75'
Manager:
Flag of Iceland.svg Teitur Thordarson
GK1 Andy Goram (Rangers)
DF2 Jackie McNamara (Celtic)Yellow card.svg 72' Sub off.svg 75'
DF3 Tom Boyd (Celtic)
DF4 Colin Calderwood (Tottenham Hotspur)
DF5 Colin Hendry (Blackburn Rovers)
MF8 Paul McStay (Celtic)Sub off.svg 63'
MF10 Gary McAllister (Coventry City) (c)Yellow card.svg 88'
MF7 John Collins (AS Monaco)Yellow card.svg 40'
CF11 John McGinlay (Bolton Wanderers)Sub off.svg 72'
CF9 Duncan Ferguson (Everton)
CF6 Kevin Gallacher (Blackburn Rovers)
Substitutions:
GK Jim Leighton (Hibernian)
DF13 Tosh McKinlay (Celtic)Sub on.svg 75'
MF Eoin Jess (Coventry City)
MF Paul Lambert (Borussia Dortmund)
MF Billy McKinlay (Blackburn Rovers)
MF18 Ian Ferguson (Rangers)Sub on.svg 63'
FW16 Ally McCoist (Rangers)Sub on.svg 72'
Manager:
Craig Brown

Assistant referees:
Flag of Yugoslavia (1992-2003).svg Dusan Djukelić (FR Yugoslavia)
Flag of Yugoslavia (1992-2003).svg Stanko Matić (FR Yugoslavia)
Fourth official:
Flag of Yugoslavia (1992-2003).svg Zoran Arsić (FR Yugoslavia)

Match rules

  • 90 minutes.
  • Seven named substitutes.
  • Maximum of three substitutions.

See also

Related Research Articles

This article lists the results for the Scotland national football team between 1980 and 1999.

Estonian Cup 2008–09 was the twenty-second season of the Estonian football knockout tournament. Winners of the cup qualified for the second qualifying round of the UEFA Europa League 2009–10. The defending champions were Flora Tallinn, who successfully defended their title this year.

The Elite Round of the 2009 UEFA European Under-19 Championship is the second round of qualification. The winners of each group join hosts Ukraine at the Final Tournament.

Estonian Cup 2007–08 was the twenty-first season of the Estonian football knockout tournament. Winners of the cup qualified for the UEFA Cup 2008–09 second qualifying round. The defending champion, Levadia, was knocked out in the semi-final in a penalty shoot-out against Flora.

The 1992 season was the 72nd season of competitive football (soccer) in Estonia, and the first one in the Baltic country as an independent nation. The Estonia national football team under the guidance of manager Uno Piir played its first FIFA-recognized match against Slovenia on June 3, 1992: a 1-1 draw in the capital Tallinn. The team played a total number of five official matches in the year 1992, including two qualifiers for the 1994 FIFA World Cup in the United States.

The 1993 season was the second full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. After one loss and one draw in 1992 the Estonia national football team, led by manager Uno Piir, carried on in the 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification. Estonia played a total number of fourteen official matches in 1993. The only win came on July 4 against Lithuania in the Baltic Cup 1993, which was played in the Pärnu Kalevi Stadium.

The 1994 season was the third full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. After having failed to qualify for the 1994 FIFA World Cup the Estonia national football team for the first time in history competed at the qualifying tournament for the European Championship. Manager Uno Piir was replaced by Roman Ubakivi after the 4-0 loss against the United States on 7 May 1994. In twelve games Estonia only managed to get one draw.

The 1995 season was the fourth full year of competitive football in Estonia as an independent nation. After having changed managers in 1994 — Roman Ubakivi replaced Uno Piir — the Estonia national football team continued in the qualifying tournament for the European Championship. Estonia performed worse in 1995 with twelve defeats in twelve games including four major losses. At the Baltic Cup the Estonian U-23 team competed, led by coach Aavo Sarap.

The 1996 season was the fifth full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. After having a poor run in 1995 the Estonia national football team started in the qualifying tournament for the 1998 FIFA World Cup in France. The team had a new coach: Teitur Thordarson from Iceland.

The 1997 season was the sixth full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. The Estonia national football team continued in the qualifying tournament for the 1998 FIFA World Cup in France. The team ended up in fifth place in the final ranking of group 4, with one win, one draw and eight losses.

The 1998 season was the seventh full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. The Estonia national football team failed to qualify for the 1998 FIFA World Cup in France. The team ended up in fifth place in the final ranking of group 4, with one win, one draw and eight losses.

The 2000 season was the ninth full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. The Estonia national football team played thirteen matches in 2000, after not having qualified for Euro 2000 in Belgium and the Netherlands. A new manager was appointed to the team: Dutchman Arno Pijpers.

The 2008 season was the seventeenth full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. The Estonia national football team played a total number of fifteen matches in 2008 and started in the qualifying tournament for the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 1 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised France, Iceland, Serbia, Northern Ireland, Croatia and Estonia. It was the only six-team group.

Group 1 consisted of six of the 39 teams entered into the European zone: Estonia, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Scotland, and Switzerland. These six teams competed on a home-and-away basis for two of the 12 spots in the final tournament allocated to the European zone, with the group's winner and runner-up claiming those spots.

Standings and results for Group 9 of the UEFA Euro 2000 qualifying tournament.

2012 UEFA European Under-17 Football Championship was the first round of qualifications for the Final Tournament of UEFA U-17 Championship 2012. Matches were played between September 21–November 2, 2011. All times are CET/CEST.

The 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification UEFA Group H was one of the nine UEFA groups for 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification. The group consisted of six teams: Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Greece, Estonia, Cyprus, and Gibraltar.

Group 4 consisted of six of the 50 teams entered into the European zone: Austria, Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Scotland and Sweden. These six teams competed on a home-and-away basis for two of the 15 spots in the final tournament allocated to the European zone, with the group's winner and runner-up claiming those spots.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Shaw, Phil (10 October 1996). "Scotland await verdict after Estonian farce". The Independent. Retrieved 17 October 2012.
  2. Collett, Mike (3 January 1997). "Deutschland Uber Alles at Wembley". The Nation. Bangkok: Nation Multimedia Group. Reuters. Retrieved 4 June 2016.
  3. Brewin, John (10 October 2014). "One team in Tallinn: when Scotland kicked off against nobody – and still didn't win". FourFourTwo. Retrieved 15 October 2014.
  4. 1 2 "From the Vault: One team in Tallinn". The Guardian. 11 November 2011. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Carter, Jon (6 October 2011). "There's only one team in Tallinn". Soccernet. ESPN. Retrieved 17 October 2012.
  6. "1998 FIFA World Cup France ™". FIFA. Retrieved 23 December 2016.
Sources