Paul Deacon

Last updated

Paul Deacon
Paul Deacon.jpg
Personal information
Full namePaul Deacon
Born (1979-02-13) 13 February 1979 (age 42)
Wigan, Greater Manchester, England
Height5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Weight12 st 11 lb (81 kg) [1]
Playing information
Position Scrum-half, Stand-off
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1997–98 Oldham Bears 40000
1998–09 Bradford Bulls 324761124252577
2010–11 Wigan Warriors 49517054
Total377811141252631
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1999–08 England 41004
2002–07 Great Britain 1019022
2001–03 Lancashire 426020
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
2020 Sale Sharks 30030
As of 28 December 2020
Source: [2] [3] [4] [5]

Paul Deacon (born 13 February 1979) is an English rugby union coach who is the head coach of the Sale Sharks in Premiership Rugby, and former a professional rugby league footballer and coach.

Contents

A Great Britain and England international representative stand-off or scrum-half, he played in the Super League for Oldham Bears (Heritage № 1050), the Bradford Bulls (who named him in their "Team of the Century", having won the 2001, 2003 and 2005 Super League Grand Finals, the 2003 Challenge Cup, and the 2002 World Club Challenge), and his home-town club, the Wigan Warriors (with whom he won the 2010 Super League Grand Final and 2011 Challenge Cup). [2] [3]

Deacon followed this with becoming a member of Wigan's coaching staff, working closely with manager Shaun Wane.

Background

Deacon was born in Wigan, Greater Manchester, England.

Playing career

1990s

Hailing from Standish near Wigan, a former Hindley amateur, Deacon made his senior professional début four days before his 18th birthday as a substitute for Oldham in a 48–6 RL Challenge Cup fourth round home victory over Rochdale Hornets on 9 February 1997. He made only four appearances for Oldham before moving to the Bradford Bulls. He has been one of Bradford Bulls' most influential players in the 21st century so far. He signed for the Bradford Bulls from Oldham, and came through the youth system at the same time as Jamie Peacock and Stuart Fielden. Deacon scored a try and goal on his début for the Bradford Bulls at scrum-half in a 36–10 Super League home victory over Huddersfield Giants on 28 June 1998. Deacon won caps for England while at the Bradford Bulls in 1999 against France (2 matches). Deacon played for the Bradford Bulls from the interchange bench in the 1999 Super League Grand Final which was lost to St. Helens.

2000s

Deacon played for England in their 2000 World Cup campaign against Russia, Fiji, Ireland and New Zealand, and in 2001 against Wales. [4] He went on to be one of Bradford Bulls' key players, a superb organiser with a tremendous kicking game. For Great Britain he won caps while at the Bradford Bulls in 2001 against France and Australia. Deacon played for the Bradford Bulls from the interchange bench in their 2001 Super League Grand Final victory against the Wigan Warriors. As Super League VI champions, the Bradford Bulls played against 2001 NRL Premiers, the Newcastle Knights in the 2002 World Club Challenge. Deacon played at scrum-half, kicking eight goals and one field goal in Bradford Bulls' victory. Deacon played for the Bradford Bulls at scrum-half, kicking three goals in their 2002 Super League Grand Final loss against St. Helens. He was awarded the Harry Sunderland Trophy as grand final man-of-the-match despite being on the losing side. In the seasons of 2002 and 2003 Deacon's goal kicking percentage was near 80%. He represented Great Britain in 2002 against New Zealand (3 matches), in 2003 against Australia (2 matches, plus 1 as sub). Deacon played for the Bradford Bulls at scrum-half, kicking six goals and one drop goal in their 2003 Super League Grand Final victory against the Wigan Warriors. He also played for the Bradford Bulls at scrum-half in their 2004 Super League Grand Final loss against the Leeds Rhinos.

Deacon played for the Bradford Bulls at scrum-half, kicking three goal from five attempts in their 2005 Super League Grand Final victory against Leeds Rhinos He played in the 2005 Tri Nations against Australia and New Zealand (2 matches). [5] On 23 June 2006, Paul Deacon broke the record points scored for a Bradford Norther/Bradford Bulls player (1,834), which was previously held by Keith Mumby. In 2007 Paul became the Bradford Bulls captain taking over from Iestyn Harris. In August 2007 he was named in Bradford Bull' Team of the Century. In September 2007 Deacon reached 2,000 goals for the Bradford Bulls. Deacon was recalled for the Great Britain train-on squad for the 2007 test series with New Zealand, but pulled out due to injury. In 2008 Deacon celebrated his testimonial year with the Bradford Bulls after 10-years of service for the Super League club. As well as a testimonial match against his hometown club Wigan Warriors in January, Paul Deacon's name also appeared on all away jerseys to commemorate his loyalty to the Bradford Bulls. On 16 April 2008 Paul signed a new 2-year contract until 2010. He was forced to rule himself out of contention for the England training squad for the 2008 Rugby League World Cup through injury. [6] In November 2009, Deacon signed for Wigan after 11-years at the Bradford Bulls.

2010s

Deacon appeared in his first Grand Final in 5-years by playing in the 2010 Super League Grand Final victory over St Helens at Old Trafford. [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20]

Deacon played in the 2011 Challenge Cup Final 28–18 victory over the Leeds Rhinos at Wembley Stadium. [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35]

Deacon with the Wigan Warriors in 2012 Sam Tomkins 1.jpg
Deacon with the Wigan Warriors in 2012

Coaching career

Rugby League

Following his retirement from playing, Deacon joined Wigan's coaching staff where he remained for four years. [36]

In 2013, Deacon was appointed assistant to Steve McNamara at the England national rugby league team, just before the beginning of the 2013 Rugby League World Cup.

Rugby Union

In July 2015 it was confirmed that Deacon would switch codes and join Premiership rugby union side Sale Sharks as attack/skills coach. [37] He was promoted to head coach in December 2020 following the departure of director of rugby Steve Diamond. [38]

Statistics

Club career

YearClubAppsPtsTGFG
1998 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 132444-
1999 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 28691321
2000 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 27859233
2001 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 27786254
2002 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 2831961471
2003 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 2931391373
2004 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 2827671232
2005 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 31359121535
2006 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 282647118-
2007 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 21216598-
2008 Bullscolours.svg Bradford Bulls 121091521

Representative career

YearTeamMatchesTriesGoalsField GoalsPoints
1999 Flag of England.svg England 2000
2000 Flag of England.svg England 4000
2001 Flag of England.svg England 4000
2002 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Great Britain 3000
2003 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Great Britain 306012
2004 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Great Britain 0000
2005 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Great Britain 313010

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