Brian Noble (rugby league)

Last updated

Brian Noble
Nobby 2017.jpg
Personal information
Full nameBrian David Noble
Born (1961-02-14) 14 February 1961 (age 60)
Bradford, West Riding of Yorkshire, England
Playing information
Height5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Weight13 st 0 lb (83 kg)
Position Hooker
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1979–93 Bradford Northern 389+33900145
1985 Cronulla Sharks 71004
1994–95 Wakefield Trinity 8+10000
Total4084000149
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1982–84 Great Britain 111004
1985–86 Yorkshire 20000
1982–83 GB Under 24 40000
1984 GB tour games 760024
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
200106 Bradford Bulls 18013624076
200609 Wigan Warriors 914943854
2010 Crusaders RL 311401745
201314 Salford Red Devils 23701630
Total325206611163
Representative
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
200406 Great Britain 1460843
Source: [1] [2] [3]

Brian David Noble MBE (born 14 February 1961), also known by the nickname of "Nobby", is an English rugby league coach and former rugby league footballer. As a footballer, Noble was a Great Britain representative hooker, [1] but is best known for his coaching career, during which he coached the Bradford Bulls, the Wigan Warriors, the Crusaders RL and the Salford Red Devils in the Super League, and the Great Britain national team. He was the first coach to win three Super League Grand Finals, and is one of only two coaches to have achieved that feat along with Brian McDermott. He was formerly the Director of Rugby for the Toronto Wolfpack, and also works as a pundit for BBC Sport.

Contents

Background

Noble was born in Bradford, West Riding of Yorkshire, England.

Playing career

Brian Noble's early rugby league career was as a member of the Police Boys' Clubs before he signed for Bradford Northern. His début came in the 1978–79 season and was the beginning of almost 15 years and over 400 games with the club, concluding in the centenary season of 1995-96 following a spell at Wakefield Trinity (Heritage No. 1062).

Noble combined his professional career with his job as a policeman, [4] and captained Great Britain on the Lions' tour of Australasia in 1984. [5] He played in all seven tests on the tour, including the test in Papua New Guinea. [1]

Brian Noble played hooker in Bradford Northern's 5–10 defeat by Castleford in the 1981 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1981–82 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 3 October 1981, played hooker in the 7–18 defeat by Hull F.C. in the 1982 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1981–82 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Saturday 2 October 1982, played hooker in the 12–12 draw with Castleford in the 1987 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1987–88 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 17 October 1987, played hooker in the 11–2 victory Castleford in the 1987 Yorkshire County Cup Final replay during the 1987–88 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Saturday 31 October 1987. Brian Noble played hooker in Bradford Northern's 2–12 defeat by Warrington in the 1990–91 Regal Trophy Final during the 1990–91 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 12 January 1991, and played hooker (replaced by interchange/substitute Trevor Clark) in the 15–8 defeat by Wigan in the 1992–93 Regal Trophy Final during the 1992–93 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Saturday 23 January 1993. [6]

Coaching career

Bradford

After 6 years serving in the backroom staff at the club following his retirement, he was appointed Bradford head coach in November 2000. [7] After initial confusion regarding chairman Chris Caisley's appointment - the tabloids reported that the new coach was Radio 4 comedian Ross Noble! - he was a hugely popular choice to succeed departing coach Matthew Elliott. Noble took Bradford Bulls to the 2001 Super League Grand Final in which they defeated Wigan. As Super League VI champions, Bradford played against 2001 NRL Premiers, the Newcastle Knights in the 2002 World Club Challenge. Noble oversaw Bradford's victory. In July 2002, Noble received an honorary doctorate from the University of Bradford for his achievements as a rugby league footballer, and coach. He took Bradford to the 2002 Super League Grand Final which was lost to St. Helens. He was named Super League coach of the year in 2003 and succeeded David Waite as Great Britain coach following the 2003 Ashes series. Noble took Bradford to the Grand Final again in 2004 but lost out to local rivals Leeds Rhinos 16–8 at Old Trafford. Noble led Bradford to victory in the 2005 Super League Grand Final his third Championship in five years with the club. Noble left Bradford midway through the 2006 season to join Wigan, handing control to his assistant Steve McNamara.

While head coach of the Bradford Bulls, Noble guided them to two Minor Premiership titles, victory in three Grand Finals in 2001, 2003 and 2005, victory in the Challenge Cup in 2003 and to three World Club Championships in 2002, 2004 and 2006. In 2004 he received the Rugby League International Federation's coach of the year award. [8]

Noble coaching Wigan against Harlequins RL Brian Noble.jpg
Noble coaching Wigan against Harlequins RL

Wigan

On 20 April 2006 Noble took up the position of head coach at Wigan, nine days after the sacking of Ian Millward. Brian took over at the club during a relegation battle which at one point looked as though Wigan would lose, however he has been credited for keeping Wigan in Super League following a number of impressive performance. However, despite having just £60,000 available to spend under the salary cap, Noble bought Stuart Fielden and Michael Dobson from the Bradford Bulls for a world record £450,000. At the end of the season when the club's books were audited by the league's accountants, it was found there was an unauthorised overspend of £222,314, which led to allegations that the club cheated their way out of relegation by deliberately spending money they didn't have due to salary cap restrictions. However the club was eventually only found guilty of "breaching the spirit of the cap", by trying to restructure existing contracts.

On 17 January 2007 it was announced that his contract as head coach of the British national team would not be renewed.

In October 2009, after the defeat by St Helens in the semi-final play-off game, Noble announced he would be leaving to club. [9] [10]

Crusaders RL

On 14 October 2009 Noble was confirmed as the new head coach of the Welsh side Crusaders. [11] Jon Sharp was first-team coach, and Iestyn Harris was an assistant. In the 2010 season Noble managed to gain 13 wins, which was a vast improvement on the season before, and took them into the play offs for the first time.

In November 2010, Noble confirmed his departure from Crusaders Rugby League after only one season in charge. His last match as Head Coach was an 18–12 loss away to Huddersfield in an Elimination Play-off tie.

Salford

On 13 April 2013 Noble was appointed head coach of Salford on an 18-month contract, but on 4 April 2014, Marwan Koukash announced that Noble would become the director of football at Salford, while Noble's former assistant Iestyn Harris would become the new head coach. [12] He departed the club soon after.

Following his departure from Salford, Noble worked in a part-time consultancy basis with London Broncos and Gloucestershire All Golds, while regularly appearing as a pundit and occasionally as a co-commentator on BBC Sport's rugby league coverage.

Honours

Noble was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 2017 Birthday Honours for services to rugby league and charity. [13]

As a player

As a coach

Team

Individual

Related Research Articles

Stephen Norton, also known by the nickname of "Knocker", is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Fryston ARLFC, Castleford, Hull F.C. and Wakefield Trinity, as a second-row or loose forward, and coached at club level for Barrow.

David J. Ward is an English former rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Leeds, as a hooker, and coached at club level for Hunslet, Leeds, Batley, and Featherstone Rovers. He won a total of 12 Great Britain caps.

Paul Medley is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Leeds, Halifax, Bradford Northern/Bradford Bulls and Dewsbury Rams, as a prop, second-row, or loose forward.

Keith Mumby, also known by the nickname of "Sir Keith", is an English former rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, who most famously played for Bradford Northern between 1973 and 1993, and Sheffield Eagles and Wakefield Trinity, as a toe-end style goal-kicking fullback, or centre.

Mal Reilly former professional RL coach and GB & England international rugby league footballer

Malcolm John Reilly OBE is an English former rugby league player and coach. He played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford in England, and Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles in Australia, as a loose forward,

David Hobbs is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Featherstone Rovers, Oldham, Bradford Northern and Wakefield Trinity (captain), as a prop, second-row or loose forward, and coached at club level for Bradford Northern, Wakefield Trinity and Featherstone Rovers.

Dean Sampson is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played as a prop, and spent the majority of his professional career at the Castleford Tigers, with spells in Australia for Gold Coast and the Parramatta Eels. Sampson made over 400 appearances for Castleford (Tigers) between 1987 and 2005. He also represented England and Great Britain at international level, and was selected to go on the 1992 Great Britain Lions tour of Australia and New Zealand.

Kelvin Skerrett is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 2000s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Wales, and at club level for Hunslet, Bradford Northern, Western Suburbs Magpies, Wigan and the Halifax Blue Sox, as prop or second-row, and coached at club level for Oulton Raiders ARLFC, and Methley Royals ARLFC.

Stephen "Steve" McGowan also known by the nickname of "Stick", is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at club level for Bradford Northern, North Sydney and Wakefield Trinity, as a centre, i.e. number 3 or 4.

Anthony Fisher, also known by the nickname of "Fishcake", is a Welsh former rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s, and coached rugby league in the 1980s and 1990s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Swansea RFC, as a hooker, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and Wales, and at club level for Bradford Northern, Leeds and Castleford, as a prop, or hooker, i.e. number 8 or 10, or 9, during the era of contested scrums, and coached representative level rugby league (RL) for South Africa, and at club level for Bramley, Keighley, Doncaster and Dewsbury.

Lee Crooks is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 1990s, 2000s and 2010s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Hull FC, Western Suburbs Magpies, Balmain Tigers, Leeds and Castleford, as a prop or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, captain of Hull during the 1985–86 and 1986–87 seasons, and coached at representative level for Serbia, and at club level for Keighley and York.

John D. Joyner, also known by the nickname of "JJ", is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford, as a centre, stand-off, or loose forward, i.e. number 3 or 4, 6, or 13, and coached at club level for Castleford.

Kevin Beardmore is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford, as a hooker or prop, i.e. number 9, or, 8 or 10.

Karl Fairbank, also known by the nickname of 'Konkreet', is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 1990s, 2000s and 2010s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Bradford Northern, as a prop, or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, and has coached at club level for Halifax Under-21s, and Elland ARLFC open-age.

Paul Harkin is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Bradford Northern, Featherstone Rovers, Hull Kingston Rovers, Leeds, Halifax, and Hunslet, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7, and coached at club level for Wakefield Trinity, Town Leagues Club, and Crigglestone All Blacks ARLFC.

Keith England, also known by the nickname of "Beefy", is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Castleford, as a prop, or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12.

Tony Marchant is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford, Wynnum Manly Seagulls, Bradford Northern and Dewsbury, as a wing, or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4.

David Plange is an English Owner/Chief Pilot of Alpha2Bravo, and former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 1990s and 2000s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Doncaster, Castleford, Sheffield Eagles, Hull Kingston Rovers and Hunslet Hawks as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5, and coached at club level for Hunslet Hawks, Leeds Rhinos, and Warrington Wolves.

John Pendlebury is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 1990s. He played at representative level for Lancashire, and at club level for Wigan, Salford, Halifax, Bradford Northern and Leigh, as a scrum-half, hooker or loose forward, i.e. number 7, 9, or, 13, and coached at club level for the Halifax Blue Sox.

Martin Ketteridge is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Scotland, and at club level for Moorends ARLFC, Castleford, the Sheffield Eagles and Halifax, as a prop, or second-row.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. RL Record Keepers' Club
  4. Emery, David (1984). WHO'S WHO IN RUGBY LEAGUE. London: Queen Anne Press. ISBN   0-356-10436-2.
  5. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/rugby_league/3688929.stm [ bare URL ]
  6. "23rd January 1993: Bradford 8 Wigan 15 (Regal Trophy Final)". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  7. "Super League Team-by-team guide". telegraph.co.uk. London: Telegraph Media Group Limited. 1 March 2001. Retrieved 10 October 2010.
  8. "Awards". rlif.com. Rugby League International Federation . Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  9. Dawkes, Phil (3 October 2009). "St Helens 14-10 Wigan". BBC Sport. Retrieved 7 October 2009.
  10. "Coach Noble confirms Wigan exit". BBC Sport. 3 October 2009. Retrieved 7 October 2009.
  11. "Noble unveiled as Crusaders coach". BBC Sport. 14 October 2009. Retrieved 14 October 2009.
  12. http://www.superleague.co.uk/article/29909/harris-appointed-head-coach-at [ bare URL ]
  13. "No. 61962". The London Gazette (Supplement). 17 June 2017. p. B21.
Sporting positions


Preceded by
Matthew Elliott
1996-2000
Coach
Bullscolours.svg
Bradford Bulls

2001-2006
Succeeded by
Steve McNamara
2006-2010
Preceded by
David Waite
2001-2003
Coach
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain

2004-2006
Succeeded by
Tony Smith
2007
Preceded by
Ian Millward
2005-2006
Coach
Wigancolours.svg
Wigan Warriors

2006-2009
Succeeded by
Michael Maguire
2009-2011
Preceded by
John Dixon
2005-2009
Coach
Cruscolours.svg
Crusaders

2009-2010
Succeeded by
Iestyn Harris
2011
Preceded by
Alan Hunte (interim)
2013
Coach
North Sydney colours.svg
Salford Red Devils

2013-2014
Succeeded by
Iestyn Harris
2014-2015