Port of Stockton

Last updated
Port of Stockton
Port of Stockton.jpg
Port of Stockton
Location
Country United States
Location Stockton, California
Coordinates 37°57′06″N121°19′04″W / 37.95164°N 121.31764°W / 37.95164; -121.31764
UN/LOCODE USSCK [1]
Details
Opened1932
Land area4,200 acres (17 km2)
Available berths14
Statistics
Vessel arrivals230 (CY 2014)
Annual cargo tonnage4.1 million metric revenue tons (CY 2014) [2]
Value of cargo US$1.5 billion (CY 2014)
Website
www.portofstockton.com
Northern California's Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The Sacramento River flows into the delta from the north and the San Joaquin River from the south through Stockton. Map show how far inland the Port of Stockton is. Wpdms usgs photo sacramento delta 2.jpg
Northern California's Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The Sacramento River flows into the delta from the north and the San Joaquin River from the south through Stockton. Map show how far inland the Port of Stockton is.
Map showing the Port of Stockton on the San Joaquin River San Joaquin River watershed.png
Map showing the Port of Stockton on the San Joaquin River

The Port of Stockton is a major deepwater port on the Stockton Ship Channel of the Pacific Ocean and an inland port located more than seventy nautical miles from the ocean, in Stockton, California on the Stockton Channel and San Joaquin River-Stockton Deepwater Shipping Channel (before it joins the Sacramento River to empty into Suisun Bay). The port sits on about 4,200 acres (17 km2), and occupies an island in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, and a portion of a neighborhood known as Boggs Tract. It is governed by a commission appointed by the City of Stockton and San Joaquin County. In 2012 it employed 4,500 people and made about $4.9 million in local tax funds. [3]

Contents

Geography

The only natural outlet for the waters of the Central Valley to pass into the sea is through the narrow Carquinez Strait, at the inland eastern extreme of San Pablo Bay. Further inland are the Suisun and Grizzly Bays, arms of the Pacific Ocean deep in the Californian interior. Further inland again from these last bays is the broad Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, formed where the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers meet and cross together. This verdant triangle of land with deep black soils is at the heart of the Central Valley and stretches some fifty miles from Suisun Bay on the west to the cities of Stockton and Sacramento on the east.

Pollution

The California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment issued advice in 2007, based on high levels of PCBs, that no one should eat any fish or shellfish from the Port of Stockton. [4]

History

Stockton, California circa 1860 Stockton California circa 1860.jpg
Stockton, California circa 1860

In 1846, the first cargo boat ascended the San Joaquin River. In 1848, John Doak established the first ferry service on the river, and the first freight vessel, the sloop Maria, visited Stockton. In 1849, Doak brought lumber from San Francisco to Stockton and began a lumber business. By the 1850s, the port had become a center of commodity shipping and the supply center for the California goldfields. By the 1860s, the region saw a decline in gold production and an increase in agriculture.

The first dredging contracts for the Stockton Deepwater Channel were awarded in 1930. The Port District officially opened on February 2, 1933 when the ship Daisy Grey arrived bringing lumber from Oregon.

During World War II an attack on coastal California seemed likely, the U.S. War Department requested some ships be built at an inland ports, so many new ships were built at the Port of Stockton area. [5] [6]

Port management recognized the increasing importance of containerized cargo and upgraded dock side facilities. The ship channel was improved in order to accommodate large Panamax class ships.

The Navy Rough and Ready Island Naval Supply Depot built during World War II was phased out of use as a result of special federal legislation sponsored by U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) in 1995. It was transferred to the port between 2000 and 2003. This area of the port is now known as the "West Complex". [7]

Port services

Port of Stockton worker moving a container Port of Stockton loading.jpg
Port of Stockton worker moving a container
California's Green Trade Corridor Marine Highway project to Port of Stockton California Green Trade Corridor.jpg
California’s Green Trade Corridor Marine Highway project to Port of Stockton
Stockton Deep Water Shipping Channel StocktonDeepwaterShippingChannel.jpg
Stockton Deep Water Shipping Channel

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Colberg Boat Works shipyard in Stockton, California, United States

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Hickinbotham Brothers Shipbuilders shipyard in Stockton, California, United States

Hickinbotham Brothers Shipbuilders was a shipbuilding company in Stockton, California on the Stockton Channel. To support the World War II demand for ships Hickinbotham Brothers built: Type V ship Tugboats, Tank Landing Barge, balloon barges and Coastal Freighter. Hickinbotham Brothers also called Hickinbotham Brothers Construction Division was opened in 1852 and is still a working shipyard. Hickinbotham Brothers started by building: horse carriages, horse wagons, threshers and Combine harvester. In 1942 Ronald Guntert and L. R. Zimmerman ran the company as a partnership on the Banner Island waterfront. After World War II, Guntert and Zimmerman purchased Hickinbotham out and renamed the company Guntert & Zimmerman Construction. In 1984 the company moved to Ripon, California on the Stanislaus River, as the business continues. The Banner Island waterfront yard was on the deepwater port on the Stockton Ship Channel of the Pacific Ocean and an inland port located more than seventy nautical miles from the ocean, on the Stockton Channel and San Joaquin River-Stockton Deepwater Shipping Channel (before it joins the Sacramento River to empty into Suisun Bay. Notable ship: USNS Shearwater.

Kyle and Company shipyard in Stockton, California, United States

Kyle & Company or Kyle & Co was a steel shipbuilding company in Stockton, California. To support the World War II demand for ships Kyle & Company built: Coastal tankers and Type B ship deck barges. Kyle & Company was opened as a manufacturer of steel products and build ships for the war. After World War II, the shipyard closed in 1950 and was purchased by Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Co.. Kyle & Company also made steel products in Fresno and Sacramento. The shipyard was located on the Stockton Channel at 348 North Harrison Street, now a parking lot near Banner Stadium and Stockton Arena. The Kyle & Company shipyard was on the deepwater port on the Stockton Ship Channel of the Pacific Ocean and an inland port located more than seventy nautical miles from the ocean, on the Stockton Channel and San Joaquin River-Stockton Deepwater Shipping Channel.

Clyde W. Wood was a shipbuilding company in Stockton, California. To support the World War 2 demand for ships Clyde W. Wood built: tugboats, and US Army barges. Clyde W. Wood started as a construction company paving asphalt and concrete slabs. In 1941 the company opened a small emergency shipyard. The yard first built barges and then tugs for the Army. After World War 2, the shipyard closed in 1945. The yard was located at 1805 Harbor Street, Stockton, the current location of the Penny Newman Grain Terminal. The shipyard was on the Stockton Channel on the deepwater port on the Stockton Ship Channel of the Pacific Ocean and an inland port located more than seventy nautical miles from the ocean, on the Stockton Channel and San Joaquin River-Stockton Deepwater Shipping Channel (before it joins the Sacramento River to empty into Suisun Bay.

References

  1. "UNLOCODE (US) - UNITED STATES". service.unece.org. Retrieved 24 March 2021.
  2. "Port of Stockton sets record for shipping in 2014".
  3. "Caltrans Port of Stockton Fact Sheet" (PDF). Retrieved April 7, 2014.
  4. OEHHA (March 9, 2007). "Port of Stockton". oehha.ca.gov. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  5. stocktonhistoricalmaritimemuseum.org
  6. NPS World War II Shipbuilding in the San Francisco Bay Area
  7. Fujii, Reed. "Ready, no longer Rough".
  8. Magazine, Pacific Maritime. "M-580: California's Marine Highway".
  9. http://www.portofstockton.com/.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. "Green Trade Corridor Marine Highway - Port of Oakland".

Bibliography