Switzerland women's national football team

Last updated

Switzerland
Nickname(s) La Nati
Association Swiss Football Association
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Nils Nielsen
Captain Caroline Abbé
Most caps Martina Moser (109)
Top scorer Ana-Maria Crnogorčević (49)
FIFA code SUI
Kit left arm suica1819h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body suica1819h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm suica1819h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts sides on white.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks zwit16h.png
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm zwi16a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body zwi16away.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm zwi16a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts whitesides.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks zwi16a.png
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 19 Decrease2.svg 1 (27 September 2019) [1]
Highest15 (June 2016)
Lowest31 (March 2007)
First international
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 2–2 France  Flag of France.svg
(Basel, Switzerland; 4 May 1972)
Biggest win
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 11–0 Malta  Flag of Malta.svg
(Zug, Switzerland; 5 April 2014)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 11–0 Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg
(Weingarten, Germany; 25 September 1994)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2015 )
Best resultRound of 16 (2015)
European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2017 )
Best resultGroup stage (2017)

The Switzerland women's national football team represents Switzerland in international women's football. [2] The team played its first match in 1972.

Switzerland Federal republic in Central Europe

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a sovereign state situated in the confluence of western, central, and southern Europe. It is a federal republic composed of 26 cantons, with federal authorities seated in Bern. Switzerland is a landlocked country bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east. It is geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi), and land area of 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi). While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8.5 million is concentrated mostly on the plateau, where the largest cities are located, among them the two global cities and economic centres of Zürich and Geneva.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, usually known as women's football or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

Contents

Switzerland qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada by winning their qualifying group. It was the first time that Switzerland participated in a women's World Cup, and the first time both the men's team and women's team qualified for a World Cup simultaneously. [3] [4]

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup 2015 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament was hosted by Canada for the first time and by a North American country for the third time. Matches were played in six cities across Canada in five time zones. The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup qualification

The qualification for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup determined which 23 teams joined Canada, the hosts of the 2015 tournament, to play for the Women's World Cup.

At the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, Switzerland was drawn into Group C with Japan, Cameroon and Ecuador. They secured a 10–1 victory over Ecuador, but lost 1–0 to Japan and 2–1 to Cameroon. Switzerland finished third in their group, but they were one of the top four third place finishers and advanced to the knockout round. In the Round of 16, Switzerland lost 1–0 to the hosts, Team Canada and were eliminated. [5]

Japan womens national football team womens national association football team representing Japan

The Japan women's national football team, or Nadeshiko Japan (なでしこジャパン), represents Japan in women's association football and is run by the Japan Football Association (JFA). It is the most successful women's national team from the Asian Football Confederation. Its highest ranking in the FIFA Women's World Rankings is 3rd, achieved in December 2011.

The Cameroon national women's football team, also known as the Indomitable Lionesses, is the national team of Cameroon and is controlled by the Cameroon Football Association. They finished second in the 1991, 2004, 2014, and 2016 Africa Women Cup of Nations, participated in the 2012 Olympic Games and have competed in their first ever FIFA Women's World Cup in 2015.

The Ecuadorian women's national football team represents Ecuador in international women's football.

Switzerland qualified for the European Championship for the first time in 2017. They were placed in Group C alongside France, Austria and Iceland. They lost to Austria 1–0, but then rebounded to beat Iceland 2–1. Switzerland went into their final group match against France needing a win in order to advance to the knockout stage. Switzerland led for much of the match after Ana-Maria Crnogorčević scored in the 19th minute, but Camille Abily scored the equalizer for France in the 76th minute, and the match ended in a 1–1 draw, as a result Switzerland finished third in their group and did not advance.

UEFA Womens Championship European association football tournament for womens national teams

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the ‘European Cup’, held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

UEFA Womens Euro 2017 2017 edition of the UEFA Womens Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams.

France womens national football team womens national association football team representing France

The French women's national football team is directed by the French Football Federation (FFF). The team competes as a member of UEFA in various international football tournaments such as the FIFA Women's World Cup, UEFA Women's Euro, the Summer Olympics, and the Algarve Cup.

Switzerland has never qualified for the Olympic games.

Record

World Cup

World Cup Finals
YearResultPos.GPWDLGFGA
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 to Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Did not qualify
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Round of 16154103115
Flag of France.svg 2019 Did not qualify
Total1/84103115
FIFA Women's World Cup history
YearRoundDateOpponentResultStadium
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Group stage8 JuneFlag of Japan.svg  Japan L 0–1 BC Place, Vancouver
12 JuneFlag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador W 10–1
16 JuneFlag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon L 1–2 Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton
Round of 1621 JuneFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada L 0–1 BC Place, Vancouver

European Championship

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGA
1984 to Flag of Sweden.svg 2013 Did not qualify
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2017 Group Stage311133
Total1/12311133

Recent schedule and results

2018

2019

Players

Current squad

The following 25 players were called up for the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifiers against Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania and Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia on 4 and 8 October 2019, respectively. [6]

The UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying competition is a women's football competition that will determine the 15 teams joining the automatically qualified hosts England in the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 final tournament.

The Lithuania women's national football team represents Lithuania in international women's football and is controlled by the Lithuanian Football Federation, the governing body for football in Lithuania.

The Croatia women's national football team represents the Republic of Croatia in international football. The team is managed by the Croatian Football Federation, the governing body for football in the country.

Head coach: Nils Nielsen

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
1 GK Seraina Friedli (1993-03-20) 20 March 1993 (age 26)20 Flag of Switzerland.svg Zürich
1 GK Elvira Herzog (2000-03-05) 5 March 2000 (age 19)00 Flag of Switzerland.svg Zürich
1 GK Gaëlle Thalmann (1986-01-18) 18 January 1986 (age 33)560 Flag of Italy.svg Sassuolo

2 DF Lorena Baumann (1997-02-11) 11 February 1997 (age 22)10 Flag of Switzerland.svg Zürich
2 DF Jana Brunner (1997-01-20) 20 January 1997 (age 22)60 Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel
2 DF Luana Bühler (1996-04-28) 28 April 1996 (age 23)40 Flag of Germany.svg TSG 1899 Hoffenheim
2 DF Rahel Kiwic (1991-01-05) 5 January 1991 (age 28)528 Flag of Germany.svg Turbine Potsdam
2 DF Noëlle Maritz (1995-12-23) 23 December 1995 (age 23)511 Flag of Germany.svg VfL Wolfsburg
2 DF Naomi Mégroz (1998-06-08) 8 June 1998 (age 21)10 Flag of Germany.svg SC Freiburg
2 DF Rachel Rinast (1991-06-02) 2 June 1991 (age 28)211 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FC Köln
2 DF Julia Stierli (1997-04-03) 3 April 1997 (age 22)00 Flag of Switzerland.svg Zürich

3 MF Vanessa Bernauer (1988-03-23) 23 March 1988 (age 31)685 Flag of Italy.svg Roma
3 MF Malin Gut (2000-08-01) 1 August 2000 (age 19)30 Flag of Switzerland.svg Grasshopper
3 MF Sandy Maendly (1988-04-04) 4 April 1988 (age 31)7012 Flag of Switzerland.svg Servette Chênois
3 MF Lara Marti (1999-09-21) 21 September 1999 (age 20)10 Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel
3 MF Sandrine Mauron (1996-12-19) 19 December 1996 (age 22)72 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FFC Frankfurt
3 MF Coumba Sow (1994-08-27) 27 August 1994 (age 25)31 Flag of France.svg Paris FC
3 MF Lia Wälti (1993-04-19) 19 April 1993 (age 26)654 Flag of England.svg Arsenal

4 FW Eseosa Aigbogun (1993-05-23) 23 May 1993 (age 26)413 Flag of France.svg Paris FC
4 FW Ramona Bachmann (1990-12-25) 25 December 1990 (age 28)8343 Flag of England.svg Chelsea
4 FW Viola Calligaris (1996-03-17) 17 March 1996 (age 23)70 Flag of Spain.svg Valencia
4 FW Ana-Maria Crnogorčević (1990-10-03) 3 October 1990 (age 29)9349 Flag of the United States.svg Portland Thorns
4 FW Fabienne Humm (1986-12-20) 20 December 1986 (age 32)5922 Flag of Switzerland.svg Zürich
4 FW Alisha Lehmann (1999-01-21) 21 January 1999 (age 20)50 Flag of England.svg West Ham United
4 FW Géraldine Reuteler (1999-04-21) 21 April 1999 (age 20)62 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FFC Frankfurt

Recent call-ups

The following players have been named to a roster in the past 12 months.

This list may be incomplete.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Nadja Furrer (1998-04-30) 30 April 1998 (age 21)10 2019 Algarve Cup

DF Marilena Widmer (1997-08-07) 7 August 1997 (age 22)100 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FFC Frankfurt v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, 29 May 2019
DF Nina Stapelfeldt (1995-04-13) 13 April 1995 (age 24)10 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Twente v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, 29 May 2019
DF Irina Brütsch (1995-07-24) 24 July 1995 (age 24)10 2019 Algarve Cup
DF Carola Fasel (1997-06-27) 27 June 1997 (age 22)10 2019 Algarve Cup
DF Thais Hurni (1998-07-22) 22 July 1998 (age 21)10 2019 Algarve Cup

MF Francesca Calò (1995-05-25) 25 May 1995 (age 24)30 Flag of Germany.svg Werder Bremen v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, 29 May 2019
MF Lesley Ramseier (1997-06-05) 5 June 1997 (age 22)10 Flag of Switzerland.svg Zürich 2019 Algarve Cup
MF Lara Dickenmann (1985-11-27) 27 November 1985 (age 33)12247 Flag of Germany.svg VfL Wolfsburg v. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium, 9 October 2018

FW Kim Dubs (1998-09-22) 22 September 1998 (age 21)10 Flag of the United States.svg Penn State Nittany Lions v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, 29 May 2019
FW Camille Surdez (1998-01-13) 13 January 1998 (age 21)30 Flag of France.svg Bordeaux v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, 29 May 2019
FW Melanie Müller (1996-05-31) 31 May 1996 (age 23)30 Flag of Switzerland.svg Zürich 2019 Algarve Cup

Qualifying history

CompetitionStageResultOpponentPosition / Notes
1984 EC QS GS: Gr.32–0 1–1Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
1–1 0–0Flag of France.svg  France
0–2 0–2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 3 / 4
Flag of Norway.svg 1987 EC QS GS: Gr.42–0 0–3Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
0–3 1–2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
1–2 1–1Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 4 / 4
Flag of Germany.svg 1989 EC QS GS: Gr.31–7 3–0Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
0–0 0–10Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany
0–5 0–6Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 4 / 4
Flag of Denmark.svg 1991 EC QS GS: Gr.50–4 0–4Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
0–0 2–1Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
1–4 0–4Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 3 / 4
Flag of Italy.svg 1993 EC QS GS: Gr.10–10 0–6Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
0–0 0–1Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 3 / 3
Flag of Germany.svg 1995 EC QS GS: Gr.53–2 4–2Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
0–5 0–11Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
1–2 1–1Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 3 / 4
Flag of Norway.svg 1997 EC QS GS: Class B, Gr.35–0 1–1Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg  Yugoslavia
Flag of Sweden.svg 3–0 3–4Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
0–2 3–1Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 1 / 4
Promotion play-off3–2 3–0Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia Promoted to Class A
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 WC QS GS: Class A, Gr.20–1 0–1Flag of Finland.svg  Finland
1–2 0–3Flag of France.svg  France
1–3 0–2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 4 / 4
Relegation play-off1–0 4–0Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
Flag of Germany.svg 2001 EC QS GS: Class A, Gr.20–4 0–1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
0–3 0–1Flag of England.svg  England
1–0 0–2Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 4 / 4
Relegation play-off1–1 0–0Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 WC QS GS: Class A, Gr.21–0 0–1Flag of Finland.svg  Finland
0–4 1–4Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
0–5 0–4Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 3 / 4
Flag of England.svg 2005 EC QS GS: Class A, Gr.10–6 0–2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
1–0 0–1Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg  Serbia and Montenegro
1–1 0–2Flag of Finland.svg  Finland
0–1 0–0Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 4 / 5
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 WC QS GS: Class A, Gr.40–2 0–2Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
0–4 0–6Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2–0 0–2Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland
0–1 1–1Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 5 / 5
Flag of Finland.svg 2009 EC QS GS: Gr.41–0 1–3Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
2–2 1–1Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
0–7 0–3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
2–0 2–0Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 3 / 5
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 WC QS GS: Gr.62–0 2–1Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland
1–2 3–0Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
2–1 6–0Flag of Israel.svg  Israel
4–2 8–0Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 1 / 5
Play-offs0–2 2–3Flag of England.svg  England
Repechage: SF3–1 0–0Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Repechage: F0–1 2–4Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Flag of Sweden.svg 2013 EC QS GS: Gr.21–4 0–6Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
4–1 2–4Flag of Romania.svg  Romania
2–3 4–3Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
8–1 0–1Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan
5–0 3–1Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 3 / 6

Related Research Articles

Switzerland national football team mens national association football team representing Switzerland

The Switzerland national football team is the national football team of Switzerland. The team is controlled by the Swiss Football Association.

Turkey national football team mens national association football team representing Turkey

The Turkey national football team represents Turkey in international football and is controlled by the Turkish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Turkey. They are affiliated with UEFA.

Iceland national football team Mens national association football team representing Iceland

The Iceland national football team represents Iceland in international football. The team is controlled by the Football Association of Iceland.

England womens national football team womens national association football team representing England

The England women's national football team has been governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). England played its first international match in November 1972 against Scotland. Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments, with the exception of the Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

Italy womens national football team womens national association football team representing Italy

The Italy women's national football team has represented Italy in international women's football since their inception in 1968. The team is controlled by the Italian Football Federation (FIGC), the governing body for football in Italy.

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

A total of 55 teams entered the 1958 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. Sweden as the hosts and West Germany, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition.

Austria womens national football team womens national association football team representing Austria

The Austria women's national football team represents Austria in international women's football competition. The team is controlled by the Austrian Football Association.

Netherlands womens national football team Womens national association football team representing the Netherlands

The Netherlands women's national football team is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

Russia womens national football team womens national association football team representing Russia

The Russia women's national football team represents Russia in international women's football. The team is controlled by the Football Union of Russia and affiliated with UEFA. Vera Pauw replaced Igor Shalimov as coach of the team in April 2011.

The Belgium women's national football team represents Belgium in international women's football. It is controlled by the Royal Belgian Football Association, the governing body for football in Belgium. Their home stadium is Den Dreef and their current coach Ives Serneels. During most of its history the team has had poor results, but showed improvement in the Euro 2013 and 2015 World Cup Qualifiers. In 2016 they qualified for their first major tournament: Euro 2017.

Ramona Bachmann Swiss footballer

Ramona Bachmann is a Swiss footballer who plays as a forward for the Switzerland women's national football team and Chelsea of the English FA WSL. Bachmann, who is from Malters, moved to Sweden aged 16 and played for Umeå IK for four seasons from 2007 until 2011. She spent the 2010 season playing in the United States for Women's Professional Soccer (WPS) club Atlanta Beat. Ahead of the 2012 season she left Umeå and signed a contract with LdB FC Malmö. She went to German Allianz Frauen-Bundesliga club VfL Wolfsburg in the summer of 2015.

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process decided all 24 teams which played in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the hosts France qualifying automatically. It is the eighth FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament is the third to be hosted in Europe, after the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden and the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany.

Gunnhildur Yrsa Jónsdóttir association football player

Gunnhildur Yrsa Jónsdóttir is an Icelandic footballer who plays as a midfielder for the Iceland women's national football team and Utah Royals FC in the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL). Gunnhildur, also known as Gunny, has seven siblings; Tindur, Urður, Ilmur, Þórunn, Sigurður, Sæmundur, and Elfur. Her parents are Laufey Sigurðardóttir and Jón Saemundsson.

England at the FIFA Womens World Cup

England have participated five times at the FIFA Women's World Cup: in 1995, in 2007, 2011, 2015 and in 2019. They have reached the quarter-finals three times and the semi-finals twice.

Netherlands have participated two times at the FIFA Women's World Cup: in 2015,in 2019. The have reached the 2nd round in 2015 and the final in 2019.

References

  1. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  2. FIFA.com (1 January 1900). "Fast-improving Switzerland aim for fresh highs" . Retrieved 13 July 2017.
  3. Reuters (21 June 2015). "Canada edge past Switzerland into last eight of Women's World Cup" . Retrieved 13 July 2017 via The Guardian.
  4. "An obituary for Switzerland" . Retrieved 13 July 2017.
  5. "Standings". UEFA. Retrieved 20 December 2013.
  6. https://www.football.ch/SFV/Nationalteams/A-Team-Frauen/News/frauen-a-team-mit-lehmann-und-mauron-gegen-litauen-und-kroatien.aspx