The Guns of Loos

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The Guns of Loos
The Guns of Loos.jpg
Directed by Sinclair Hill
Produced by Oswald Mitchell
Written by Reginald Fogwell
Leslie Howard Gordon
Joe Grossman
Sinclair Hill
Starring Henry Victor
Madeleine Carroll
Bobby Howes
Hermione Baddeley
Cinematography D.P. Cooper
Desmond Dickinson
Sidney Eaton
Edited byLeslie Brittain
Production
company
Distributed byNew Era
Release date
9 February 1928
Running time
84 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Guns of Loos is a 1928 British silent war film directed by Sinclair Hill and starring Henry Victor, Madeleine Carroll, and Bobby Howes. [1]

Contents

Plot

A blind veteran of the First World War returns home to run his family's industrial empire. [2]

Cast

Production background

Carroll was selected for the role from 150 applicants to play her role. [3] It was her first film role and helped launch her career.

Score

In 2011, sheet music for Richard Howgill's score, meant to be performed live as the film was projected, was rediscovered in Birmingham Central Library. [4]

Notes

  1. BFI Database entry
  2. Kelly p.29
  3. Wise & Baron p.232
  4. "Silent movie scores found at Birmingham central library". BirminghamNewsroom.com. Birmingham City Council. 15 July 2011. Retrieved 15 July 2011.

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References