The Joan Baez Lovesong Album

Last updated
The Joan Baez Lovesong Album
Baezlov4.jpg
Compilation album by
Released1976
Label Vanguard [1]
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
The Encyclopedia of Popular Music Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [2]
MusicHound Folk: The Essential Album Guide Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [3]
The New Rolling Stone Record Guide Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [1]

The Joan Baez Lovesong Album is a 1976 compilation of Joan Baez songs. [4] Vanguard Records put it together as part of its Baez reissue series, after Baez left the label for A&M Records. [5] The album is a collection of love songs, including traditional and contemporary work, as well as an arrangement of E. E. Cummings' "All in Green My Love Went Riding" by Peter Schickele. The cover painting is by the painter and musician Eric Von Schmidt.

Contents

Critical reception

The New Rolling Stone Album Guide , from 2004, retained the 1983 guide's 3-star rating, writing that the album remains an "admirable" collection of Baez's early work. [4] Folk Review called the album "not quite so awful as it sounds," writing that a listener can "rediscover why Joan Baez was a leading folksinger a decade ago." [6]

Track listing

  1. "Come All Ye Fair And Tender Ladies" (traditional)
  2. "Love Minus Zero/No Limit" (Bob Dylan)
  3. "Sweet Sir Galahad" (Joan Baez)
  4. "Love Is Just a Four-Letter Word" (Bob Dylan)
  5. "Wild Mountain Thyme" (traditional)
  6. "The Lass From The Low Country" (John Jacob Niles)
  7. "Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands" (Bob Dylan)
  8. "Plaisir d'Amour" (Martini Il Tedesco)
  9. "House Carpenter" (traditional)
  10. "Once I Had A Sweetheart" (traditional)
  11. "Danger Waters" (Hold Me Tight) (J. Browne)
  12. "The River In The Pines" (traditional)
  13. "Turquoise" (Donovan)
  14. "The Death Of Queen Jane" (traditional)
  15. "All In Green Went My Love Riding" (E. E. Cummings)
  16. "Once I Knew A Pretty Girl" (traditional)
  17. "The Unquiet Grave" (traditional)
  18. "So We'll Go No More A"-Roving (traditional)

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References

  1. 1 2 The New Rolling Stone Record Guide. Random House. 1983. p. 24.
  2. Larkin, Colin (2006). The Encyclopedia of Popular Music. Volume 1: MUZE. p. 361.CS1 maint: location (link)
  3. MusicHound Folk: The Essential Album Guide. Visible Ink Press. 1998. p. 34.
  4. 1 2 Brackett, Nathan; Hoard, Christian David (October 21, 2004). "The New Rolling Stone Album Guide". Simon and Schuster via Google Books.
  5. Tudor, Dean (1983). Popular Music: An Annotated Guide to Recordings. Libraries Unlimited. p. 144.
  6. Woods, Fred. "Reviews: Records". Folk Review. 6: 26.