Portrait of Joan Baez

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Portrait of Joan Baez
Portrait of Joan Baez.jpeg
Compilation album by
Released1967
Genre Folk
Label Vanguard
Producer Maynard Solomon
Joan Baez chronology
Joan
(1967)
Portrait of Joan Baez
(1967)
Baptism: A Journey Through Our Time
(1968)

Portrait of Joan Baez is a 1967 [1] Joan Baez compilation album, released in the UK. It includes material from her early 1960s traditional folk and her Bob Dylan and Phil Ochs covers. The album is mono and was released on Vinyl in the UK. It features a mix of studio and live recordings.

Track listing

  1. "There But For Fortune" (Phil Ochs)
  2. "Don't Think Twice, It's Alright" (Bob Dylan)
  3. "The Trees They Do Grow High" (traditional)
  4. "Copper Kettle" (Albert Frank Beddoe)
  5. "Mary Hamilton" (traditional)
  6. "Plaisir d'amour" (Jean-Pierre Claris de Florian/Jean-Paul-Égide Martini)
  7. "Colours" (Donovan)
  8. "Geordie" (traditional)
  9. "Farewell, Angelina" (Bob Dylan)
  10. "All My Trials" (traditional)
  11. "It Ain't Me, Babe" (Bob Dylan)
  12. "We Shall Overcome" (Guy Carawan, Frank Hamilton, Zilphia Horton, Pete Seeger)

Notes and references

  1. Baez, Joan. "Discography" . Retrieved 21 May 2015.

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