Thomas Sheppard Farm

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Thomas Sheppard Farm
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Location NC 1550, near jct. of NC 1552, Stokes, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°41′37″N77°12′35″W / 35.69361°N 77.20972°W / 35.69361; -77.20972 Coordinates: 35°41′37″N77°12′35″W / 35.69361°N 77.20972°W / 35.69361; -77.20972
Area 36.9 acres (14.9 ha)
Built c. 1850 (1850)
Architectural style Greek Revival
NRHP reference # 00000517 [1]
Added to NRHP May 18, 2000

Thomas Sheppard Farm, also known as Sheppard Mill Farm, is a historic home and farm located near Stokes, Pitt County, North Carolina. The farmhouse was built about 1850, and is a two-story, heavy timber frame dwelling with a one-story shed addition and Greek Revival style design elements. A one-story kitchen wing constructed about 1930, and was enlarged and joined to the main block about 1950. It features a one-story portico with Doric order columns. Also on the property are the contributing tenant house (c. 1930), stock barn (c. 1930), tobacco barn (c. 1930), hog pen (c. 1930), chicken house (c. 1930), brick well house (c. 1930), and agricultural landscape. [2]

Stokes is a census-designated place in Pitt County, North Carolina, United States. CDP is a part of the Greenville Metropolitan Area in North Carolina's Inner Banks region.

Pitt County, North Carolina County in the United States

Pitt County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 168,148, making it the seventeenth-most populous county in North Carolina. Its county seat is Greenville.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2000. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Betsey Gohdes-Baten (April 1999). "Thomas Sheppard Farm" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-02-01.