Thor (sculpture)

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Thor
Thor (sculpture), Portland, Oregon.jpg
The sculpture in 2015
Downtown Portland.png
Red pog.svg
Thor
Location in Portland, Oregon
Artist Melvin Schuler
Year1977 (1977)
TypeSculpture
Medium
  • Copper
  • redwood
Subject Thor
Location Portland, Oregon, United States
Coordinates 45°31′04″N122°40′45″W / 45.517895°N 122.679204°W / 45.517895; -122.679204 Coordinates: 45°31′04″N122°40′45″W / 45.517895°N 122.679204°W / 45.517895; -122.679204

Thor is an outdoor 1977 copper and redwood sculpture by American artist Melvin Schuler, located on the Transit Mall of downtown Portland, Oregon.

Portland Transit Mall

The Portland Transit Mall is a public transit corridor that travels north–south through the center of downtown Portland, Oregon, United States. It encompasses a pair of one-way streets—one for northbound traffic, the other for southbound—along which two of the three lanes are restricted to transit vehicles only. The transit mall opened in 1977 and until light rail trains were added in 2009, buses were the only transit vehicles using it. The mall was rebuilt and extended southwards from 2007 to 2009, and it reopened for buses on May 24, 2009. Light rail service on the mall was introduced on August 30, 2009, with the shifting of the MAX Yellow Line to the mall from its original routing in downtown, and a second MAX line, the Green Line, began serving the mall a month later on September 12. Between fall 2009 and July 2014, the Portland Vintage Trolley also served the transit mall on certain Sundays. Although the mall's stops are mainly served by TriMet vehicles, on weekdays buses on express routes operated by C-Tran and the Columbia County Rider also serve the mall. In September 2015, the new MAX Orange Line replaced the Yellow Line service in the southbound direction on the mall, on 5th Avenue, with the Orange and Yellow lines being through-routed at all times.

Portland, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Portland is the largest and most populous city in the U.S. state of Oregon and the seat of Multnomah County. It is a major port in the Willamette Valley region of the Pacific Northwest, at the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia rivers. As of 2018, Portland had an estimated population of 653,115, making it the 25th most populated city in the United States, and the second-most populous in the Pacific Northwest. Approximately 2.4 million people live in the Portland metropolitan statistical area (MSA), making it the 25th most populous MSA in the United States. Its Combined Statistical Area (CSA) ranks 19th-largest with a population of around 3.2 million. Approximately 60% of Oregon's population resides within the Portland metropolitan area.

Contents

Description and history

Plaque for the sculpture:
Melvin Schuler
Thor, 1977
Copper on redwood
TriMet, City of Portland
Regional Arts & Culture Council
www.racc.org Thor, Portland, Oregon - 2.jpg
Plaque for the sculpture:
Melvin Schuler
Thor, 1977
Copper on redwood
TriMet, City of Portland
Regional Arts & Culture Council
www.racc.org

Thor is an abstract outdoor sculpture depicting Thor, the hammer-wielding god of thunder in Norse mythology. Located at the intersection of Southwest 6th Avenue and Southwest Taylor Street in the Portland Transit Mall, the copper on redwood sculpture was completed in 1977, funded by TriMet and the United States Department of Transportation. It measures 7 feet (2.1 m) x 4 feet (1.2 m) x 4 feet (1.2 m). [1] According to the Regional Arts & Culture Council, the agency which administers Thor, "This piece served as a excellent example of Schuler's work, which is characterized by large cubic and angular sculptures achieved by hammering copper onto carved redwood. This process creates a unique and recognizable finish to his sculptures." [1] The sculpture was previously located at Southwest 5th between Washington and Alder. [2]

Abstract art art with a degree of independence from visual references in the world

Abstract art uses a visual language of shape, form, color and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world. Western art had been, from the Renaissance up to the middle of the 19th century, underpinned by the logic of perspective and an attempt to reproduce an illusion of visible reality. The arts of cultures other than the European had become accessible and showed alternative ways of describing visual experience to the artist. By the end of the 19th century many artists felt a need to create a new kind of art which would encompass the fundamental changes taking place in technology, science and philosophy. The sources from which individual artists drew their theoretical arguments were diverse, and reflected the social and intellectual preoccupations in all areas of Western culture at that time.

Thor Hammer-wielding Nordic god associated with thunder

In Germanic mythology, Thor is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind and also hallowing and fertility. Besides Old Norse Þórr, extensions of the god occur in Old English as Þunor and in Old High German as Donar. All forms of the deity stem from a Common Germanic *Þunraz.

Norse mythology body of mythology of the North Germanic people stemming from Norse paganism and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia and into the Scandinavian folklore of the modern period

Norse mythology is the body of myths of the North Germanic peoples, stemming from Norse paganism and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia, and into the Scandinavian folklore of the modern period. The northernmost extension of Germanic mythology, Norse mythology consists of tales of various deities, beings, and heroes derived from numerous sources from both before and after the pagan period, including medieval manuscripts, archaeological representations, and folk tradition.

See also

The year 1977 in art involved some significant events and new works.

<i>Mimir</i> (sculpture)

Mimir is an outdoor 1980 bronze and concrete sculpture by Keith Jellum, located in northwest Portland, Oregon. The sculpture was commissioned by the Portland Development Commission and Tom Walsh of Tom Walsh Construction, and is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

Keith Jellum is an American artist based in Portland, Oregon.

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<i>Kvinneakt</i>

Kvinneakt is an abstract bronze sculpture located on the Transit Mall of downtown Portland, Oregon. Designed and created by Norman J. Taylor between 1973 and 1975, the work was funded by TriMet and the United States Department of Transportation and was installed on the Transit Mall in 1977. The following year Kvinneakt appeared in the "Expose Yourself to Art" poster which featured future Mayor of Portland Bud Clark flashing the sculpture. It remained in place until November 2006 when it was removed temporarily during renovation of the Transit Mall and the installation of the MAX Light Rail on the mall.

<i>Cat in Repose</i>

Cat in Repose, also known as Seated Cat, is a stone sculpture composed of Indiana Limestone, located on the Transit Mall of downtown Portland, Oregon, United States. Designed and created by Kathleen McCullough in 1977, the sculpture is currently installed near the intersection of Southwest Fifth Avenue and Southwest Morrison Street. Cat in Repose is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

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Theodore Roosevelt, Rough Rider is an outdoor bronze sculpture by American artist Alexander Phimister Proctor, located in the South Park Blocks of Portland, Oregon in the United States. The equestrian statue was completed in 1922 and depicts Theodore Roosevelt as the leader of the cavalry regiment that fought during the Spanish–American War called the Rough Riders.

<i>Coming of the White Man</i>

Coming of the White Man is an outdoor bronze sculpture by American artist Hermon Atkins MacNeil, located in Washington Park, Portland, Oregon in the United States. The statue, gifted to the City of Portland in 1904 by former mayor David P. Thompson and installed the following year, depicts two Native American men, including Chief Multnomah, looking towards the Columbia River upon the arrival of Lewis and Clark.

<i>Ghost Ship</i> (sculpture) sculpture by James Harrison and Rigga

Ghost Ship is an outdoor 2001 sculpture by James Harrison and Rigga, a group of local artists, located along the Eastbank Esplanade in Portland, Oregon. It is made of copper, stainless steel, art glass, and two lamps. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

<i>Talos No. 2</i>

Talos No. 2 is an outdoor 1959–1977 bronze sculpture created by the American artist James Lee Hansen. It is located in the Transit Mall of downtown Portland, Oregon, in the United States.

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<i>Interlocking Forms</i>

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<i>Untitled</i> (Killmaster) sculpture by John Killmaster

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<i>Drivers Seat</i> (sculpture)

Driver's Seat is an outdoor 1994 galvanized steel sculpture by Don Merkt, located at Northwest 5th Avenue and Northwest Irving Street in Portland, Oregon's Transit Mall and Old Town Chinatown neighborhood.

<i>Untitled</i> (Morrison) sculpture by Ivan Morrison

Untitled is an outdoor 1977 painted aluminum sculpture by Ivan Morrison, located at Southwest 5th Avenue and Southwest Oak Street in the Transit Mall of Portland, Oregon.

<i>In the Shadow of the Elm</i>

In the Shadow of the Elm is an outdoor 1984 sculpture by Paul Sutinen, located at the South Park Blocks in Portland, Oregon.

<i>Whistlestop for an Organ Teacher</i>

Whistlestop for an Organ Teacher is an outdoor 2009 stainless steel sculpture by American artist Cris Bruch, located in Portland, Oregon.

<i>City Reflections</i>

City Reflections is an outdoor 2009 bronze sculpture by Patti Warashina, located in downtown Portland, Oregon.

<i>Daddy Long Legs</i> (sculpture) Mel Katz sculpture

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<i>Urban Hydrology</i>

Urban Hydrology is a series of twelve outdoor 2009 granite sculpture by Fernanda D'Agostino, installed along the Portland Transit Mall in Portland, Oregon, United States. The work is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which administers the work.

<i>Continuation</i> (sculpture) sculpture

Continuation is an outdoor 2009 granite series of sculptures by Japanese artist Michihiro Kosuge, installed along Portland, Oregon's Transit Mall, in the United States. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which administers the work.

<i>Untitled</i> (West) sculpture by Bruce West

Untitled is an outdoor 1977 stainless steel sculpture by American artist Bruce West, installed in Portland, Oregon, in the United States.

References

  1. 1 2 "Public Art Search: Thor". Regional Arts & Culture Council . Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  2. "Thor, (sculpture)". Smithsonian Institution . Retrieved September 28, 2014.