Thorbiskope

Last updated
Thorbiskope
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LocationOff SR 2049 at SR 2050, near Bunnlevel, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°13′58″N78°53′51″W / 35.23278°N 78.89750°W / 35.23278; -78.89750 Coordinates: 35°13′58″N78°53′51″W / 35.23278°N 78.89750°W / 35.23278; -78.89750
Area2.9 acres (1.2 ha)
Builtc. 1820 (1820), c. 1848
Architectural styleGreek Revival, Georgian-Federal Coastal Cottage
NRHP reference # 86000132 [1]
Added to NRHPJanuary 23, 1986

Thorbiskope, also known as the John Elliot House, is a historic plantation house located near Bunnlevel, Harnett County, North Carolina. It was built in two sections. The earliest section was built about 1820, and is a 1 1/2-story, Georgian / Federal style frame Coastal Cottage frame dwelling that forms the rear ell. About 1848, the two-story, five bay by two bay, Greek Revival style front section was added. It features a one-bay front portico. [2]

Bunnlevel, North Carolina Census-designated place in North Carolina, United States

Bunnlevel is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) along U.S. Highway 401 in Stewarts Creek Township, Harnett County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 552 at the 2010 census. It is a part of the Dunn Micropolitan Area, which is also a part of the greater Raleigh–Durham–Cary Combined Statistical Area (CSA) as defined by the United States Census Bureau.

Harnett County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina, United States

Harnett County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 114,678. Its county seat is Lillington, and its largest city is Dunn.

Georgian architecture set of architectural styles current between 1720 and 1840

Georgian architecture is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1714 and 1830. It is eponymous for the first four British monarchs of the House of Hanover—George I, George II, George III, and George IV—who reigned in continuous succession from August 1714 to June 1830. The style was revived in the late 19th century in the United States as Colonial Revival architecture and in the early 20th century in Great Britain as Neo-Georgian architecture; in both it is also called Georgian Revival architecture. In the United States the term "Georgian" is generally used to describe all buildings from the period, regardless of style; in Britain it is generally restricted to buildings that are "architectural in intention", and have stylistic characteristics that are typical of the period, though that covers a wide range.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. E. Virginia Oswald and Jim Sumner (July 1985). "Thorbiskope" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2014-08-01.