Thorntree (Kingstree, South Carolina)

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Thorntree
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Thorntree, January 2007
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LocationSC 527, in Fluitt-Nelson Memorial Park, Kingstree, South Carolina
Coordinates 33°39′44″N79°49′35″W / 33.66222°N 79.82639°W / 33.66222; -79.82639 Coordinates: 33°39′44″N79°49′35″W / 33.66222°N 79.82639°W / 33.66222; -79.82639
Area15.1 acres (6.1 ha)
Built1749 (1749)
Built byWitherspoon, James
NRHP reference # 70000606 [1]
Added to NRHPOctober 28, 1970

Thorntree, also known as the Witherspoon House, is a historic plantation house located at Kingstree, Williamsburg County, South Carolina. It was built in 1749 by immigrant James Witherspoon (1700-1765), and is a two-story, five-bay, frame "I-house" dwelling with a hall and parlor plan and exterior end chimneys. It features full-length piazzas on the front and rear elevations. To preserve it, the house was moved from an inaccessible rural site to Kingstree on land donated as a memorial park, known as Fluitt-Nelson Memorial Park. The house has been restored to its 18th-century appearance and is open to the public by appointment with the Williamsburg Historical Society. [2] [3] [4]

Kingstree, South Carolina City in South Carolina, United States

Kingstree is a city and the county seat of Williamsburg County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 3,328 at the 2010 census.

Williamsburg County, South Carolina County in the United States

Williamsburg County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2010 census its population was 34,423. The county seat is Kingstree. After a previous incarnation of Williamsburg County, the current county was created in 1804.

I-house

The I-house is a vernacular house type, popular in the United States from the colonial period onward. The I-house was so named in the 1930s by Fred Kniffen, a cultural geographer at Louisiana State University who was a specialist in folk architecture. He identified and analyzed the type in his 1936 study of Louisiana house types. He chose the name "I-house" because of its common occurrence in the rural farm areas of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, all states beginning with the letter "I". He did not use the term to imply that this house type originated in, or was restricted to, those three states. It is also referred to as Plantation Plain style.

It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1970. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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The Kingstree Historic District contains forty-eight properties situated along Main Street, Academy Street, and Hampton Street in the commercial area of downtown Kingstree, South Carolina. The district includes the courthouse, public library, railroad station, and numerous commercial buildings. The district is a fine collection of nineteenth-century vernacular commercial architecture. Details such as arched doorways and windows, cast-iron columns and pilasters, decorative or corbelled brickwork and pressed tin interior ceilings are present on most of the district's buildings. The Williamsburg County Courthouse, built ca. 1823, and designed by Robert Mills, is a fine example of Roman neoclassical design with its raised first floor, pediment with lunette, and Doric columns. In 1953-54 the courthouse underwent substantial remodeling on the exterior and interior, though it still reflects much of Mill's original design. With the exception of the courthouse, most of the buildings in the district were built between 1900 and 1920 when Kingstree enjoyed prosperity as a retail and tobacco marketing center of Williamsburg County. The majority of the buildings in the district are a visible record of this twenty-year growth and the historic fabric of the area remains substantially intact. The Kingstree Historic District was listed in the National Register of Historic Places June 28, 1982.

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Cedar Crest (Faunsdale, Alabama) plantation on the National Register of Historic Places

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Thorntree Plantation – Kingstree – Williamsburg County". South Carolina Plantations. Retrieved 3 December 2014.
  3. Mrs. James W. Fant (August 1970). "Thorntree" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. Retrieved 2014-07-01.
  4. "Thorntree, Williamsburg County (S.C. Hwy 527, Kingstree)". National Register Properties in South Carolina. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 2014-07-01.