Threat actor

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A threat actor or malicious actor is a person or entity responsible for an event or incident that impacts, or has the potential to impact, the safety or security of another entity. Most often, the term is used to describe individuals and groups that perform malicious acts against organizations of various types and sizes. From a threat intelligence perspective, threat actors are often categorized as either unintentional or intentional and either external or internal. [1]

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