Three-lined salamander

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Three-lined salamander
Eurycea guttoli(1).jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Urodela
Family: Plethodontidae
Genus: Eurycea
Species:
E. guttolineata
Binomial name
Eurycea guttolineata
(Holbrook, 1838)
Synonyms [2]
  • Salamandra gutto-lineataHolbrook, 1838

The three-lined salamander (Eurycea guttolineata) is a species of salamander in the family Plethodontidae. It is endemic to the south-eastern United States. [1] [2]

Salamander order of amphibians

Salamanders are a group of amphibians typically characterized by a lizard-like appearance, with slender bodies, blunt snouts, short limbs projecting at right angles to the body, and the presence of a tail in both larvae and adults. All present-day salamander families are grouped together under the order Urodela. Salamander diversity is most abundant in the Northern Hemisphere and most species are found in the Holarctic ecozone, with some species present in the Neotropical zone.

Plethodontidae family of amphibians

Plethodontidae', or lungless salamanders, are a family of salamanders. Most species are native to the Western Hemisphere, from British Columbia to Brazil, although a few species are found in Sardinia, Europe south of the Alps, and South Korea. In terms of number of species, they are by far the largest group of salamanders.

Contents

Distribution

The species is distributed throughout much of the southeastern United States. [3] It can be found in the Appalachian Mountains from Virginia and Tennessee south though the Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the Gulf Coast, including eastern Louisiana and western Florida. [1]

Appalachian Mountains mountain range in the eastern United States and Canada, and France

The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern North America. The Appalachians first formed roughly 480 million years ago during the Ordovician Period. They once reached elevations similar to those of the Alps and the Rocky Mountains before experiencing natural erosion. The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east–west travel, as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to most highways and railroads running east–west.

Virginia U.S. state in the United States

Virginia, officially the Commonwealth of Virginia, is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision. The Commonwealth's estimated population as of 2018 is over 8.5 million.

Louisiana U.S. state in the United States

Louisiana is a state in the Deep South region of the South Central United States. It is the 31st most extensive and the 25th most populous of the 50 United States. Louisiana is bordered by the state of Texas to the west, Arkansas to the north, Mississippi to the east, and the Gulf of Mexico to the south. A large part of its eastern boundary is demarcated by the Mississippi River. Louisiana is the only U.S. state with political subdivisions termed parishes, which are equivalent to counties. The state's capital is Baton Rouge, and its largest city is New Orleans.

Habitat

Its natural habitats are forested floodplains, ditches, streamsides, and seepages. With wet weather, the species may enter wooded terrestrial habitats. [1]

Habitat ecological or environmental area inhabited by a particular species; natural environment in which an organism lives, or the physical environment that surrounds a species population

In ecology, a habitat is the type of natural environment in which a particular species of organism lives. It is characterized by both physical and biological features. A species' habitat is those places where it can find food, shelter, protection and mates for reproduction.

It is not uncommon in suitable habitat. [1] Some subpopulations have likely been extirpated by loss of bottomland hardwood forests. [1]

Related Research Articles

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Dwarf salamander species of amphibian

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Junaluska salamander species of amphibian

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<i>Eurycea longicauda</i> species of amphibian

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Many-ribbed salamander species of amphibian

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Jollyville Plateau salamander species of amphibian

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Oklahoma salamander species of amphibian

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Grotto salamander species of amphibian

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Urspelerpes brucei, the patch-nosed salamander, is a lungless miniature salamander found in streams of Georgia and South Carolina, United States. The species is the sole member of the genus Urspelerpes within the family Plethodontidae. It marks the first discovery of an endemic amphibian genus from the United States since the Red Hills salamander (Phaeognathus) in 1961.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group (2014). "Eurycea guttolineata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2014: e.T59265A64163403. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2014-3.RLTS.T59265A64163403.en.
  2. 1 2 Frost, Darrel R. (2017). "Eurycea guttolineata (Holbrook, 1838)". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 20 June 2017.
  3. "Eurycea guttolineata". AmphibiaWeb. University of California, Berkeley. 2017. Retrieved 20 June 2017.