Thryptomene dampieri

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Thryptomene dampieri
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Thryptomene
Species:
T. dampieri
Binomial name
Thryptomene dampieri

Thryptomene dampieri is a species of flowering plant in the family Myrtaceae and is endemic to the north-west of Western Australia. It is a low, spreading shrub with prostrate stems, broadly egg-shaped leaves with the narrower end towards the base, and pinkish flowers with five petals and ten stamens.

Contents

Description

Thryptomene dampieri is usually a low, spreading shrub that typically grows to a height of 0.2–0.7 m (7.9 in–2 ft 3.6 in) with sprawling or prostrate stems that often form adventitious roots. Its leaves are more or less pressed against the stem, egg-shaped with the lower end towards the base, 1.3–3 mm (0.051–0.118 in) long and 1.5–2.2 mm (0.059–0.087 in) wide on a petiole 0.2–0.5 mm (0.0079–0.0197 in) long. The flowers are arranged in pairs in groups of up to eight along flowering branchlets on a peduncle 0.2–0.8 mm (0.0079–0.0315 in) long with egg-shaped bracteoles 0.6–1.6 mm (0.024–0.063 in) long that remain until the fruit is shed. The flowers are 4–6 mm (0.16–0.24 in) in diameter with pale pink, egg-shaped sepals 0.5–0.9 mm (0.020–0.035 in) long. The petals are pink or pinkish-purple, 1.5–2 mm (0.059–0.079 in) long and there are usually ten stamens. Flowering occurs from April to September. [2]

Taxonomy

Thryptomene dampieri was first formally described in 2014 by Barbara Lynette Rye in the journal Nuytsia from specimens collected by John Green near Denham in 1957. [2] [3] The specific epithet (dampieri) honours William Dampier who collected this species near Shark Bay in 1699. [2]

Distribution and habitat

This thryptomene grows in sand on dunes and limestone from near Exmouth to Hamelin Bay and on several off-shore islands. [2] [4]

Conservation status

Thryptomene dampieri is classified as "not threatened" by the Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife. [4] The species occurs in a long stretch of the coast of Western Australia north of Shark Bay. [2]

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References

  1. "Thryptomene calcicola". Australian Plant Census. Retrieved 25 April 2021.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Rye, Barbara L.; Trudgen, Malcolm E. (2014). "An update to the taxonomy of some Western Australian genera of Myrtaceae tribe Chamelaucieae. 3. Thryptomene" (PDF). Nuytsia. 24: 281–284. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  3. "Thryptomene dampieri". APNI. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  4. 1 2 "Thryptomene dampieri". FloraBase . Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.