Thysanocarpus radians

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Thysanocarpus radians
Thysanocarpus radians.jpeg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Brassicales
Family: Brassicaceae
Genus: Thysanocarpus
Species:T. radians
Binomial name
Thysanocarpus radians
Benth.

Thysanocarpus radians is a species of flowering plant in the mustard family known by the common name ribbed fringepod. [1] It is native to northern and central California and Oregon, where it grows in moist meadows, fields, hillsides, and other habitat. It is an annual herb growing up to 50 or 60 centimeters tall. The leaves are wavy-edged or lobed, the basal ones up to 5 centimeters long and ephemeral, and the upper ones with bases clasping the stem. The inflorescence is a long, open raceme of small whitish or purplish flowers. The fruit is a flattened, rounded, disclike capsule which hangs from its pedicel. It measures up to a centimeter long and is hairless to quite hairy in texture. The flat wing lining the edge of the disc is ribbed with rays like the spokes of a wheel, a characteristic making it easily distinguished from other Thysanocarpus when it is in fruit.

Brassicaceae family of plants

Brassicaceae or Cruciferae is a medium-sized and economically important family of flowering plants commonly known as the mustards, the crucifers, or the cabbage family. Most are herbaceous plants, some shrubs, with simple, although sometimes deeply incised, alternatingly set leaves without stipules or in leaf rosettes, with terminal inflorescences without bracts, containing flowers with four free sepals, four free alternating petals, two short and four longer free stamens, and a fruit with seeds in rows, divided by a thin wall.

California State of the United States of America

California is a state in the Pacific Region of the United States. With 39.6 million residents, California is the most populous U.S. state and the third-largest by area. The state capital is Sacramento. The Greater Los Angeles Area and the San Francisco Bay Area are the nation's second and fifth most populous urban regions, with 18.7 million and 8.8 million residents respectively. Los Angeles is California's most populous city, and the country's second most populous, after New York City. California also has the nation's most populous county, Los Angeles County, and its largest county by area, San Bernardino County. The City and County of San Francisco is both the country's second-most densely populated major city after New York City and the fifth-most densely populated county, behind only four of the five New York City boroughs.

Oregon State of the United States of America

Oregon is a state in the Pacific Northwest region on the West Coast of the United States. The Columbia River delineates much of Oregon's northern boundary with Washington, while the Snake River delineates much of its eastern boundary with Idaho. The parallel 42° north delineates the southern boundary with California and Nevada. Oregon is one of only three states of the contiguous United States to have a coastline on the Pacific Ocean.

Related Research Articles

<i>Thysanocarpus</i> genus of plants

Thysanocarpus is a small genus of plants in the mustard family known generally as fringepods or lacepods. These are small, erect annual herbs. The flat fruit capsule is generally round or oval-shaped with a wing that goes all the way around the pod, giving it a fringed look. The fruits hang from most of the length of the stem. The plants are native to the western United States.

Campanula angustiflora is a species of bellflower known by the common name Eastwood's bellflower. It is endemic to California, where it grows in the serpentine soils of the hills and mountains surrounding the San Francisco Bay Area. It is a flower of the chaparral plant community. This is a hairy annual herb producing a thin, branching stem up to 20 centimeters tall. The leaves are leathery in texture and oval in shape, measuring between 0.5 and 1 centimeter in length, with a few teeth along the edges. The bell-shaped flower is pale blue or white and just a few millimeters long. The fruit is a ribbed, spherical capsule.

Campanula californica is a species of bellflower known by the common names swamp bellflower and swamp harebell. It is endemic to California, where it grows along the coastline between Marin and Mendocino Counties. It is found mainly in wet areas such as bogs, marshes, and wet forest floors. This is a hairy rhizomatous perennial herb producing a thin, creeping stem 10 to 30 centimeters long. The thin, rippled leaves are oval in shape and between 1 and 2 centimeters long. The bell-shaped flower is pale blue with curving petals up to 1.5 centimeters long. The fruit is a ribbed, spherical capsule.

Campanula griffinii is a species of bellflower known by the common name Griffin's bellflower. It is endemic to California, where it grows in the North and Central Coast Ranges in chaparral habitat on serpentine soils. This is an annual herb producing a thin, erect stem up to 20 centimeters tall. The leathery leaves are linear in shape, toothed along the edges, and less than a centimeter long. The stem and foliage are sometimes reddish in color and may have stiff hairs. The small, cylindrical flower is pale blue to white and less than 4 millimeters long. The fruit is an oblong, ribbed capsule.

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<i>Herissantia crispa</i> species of plant

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<i>Lilaea scilloides</i> species of plant

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<i>Oligomeris linifolia</i> species of plant

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Osmorhiza depauperata is a species of flowering plant in the carrot family known by the common names bluntseed sweetroot and blunt-fruited sweet-cicely.

<i>Physalis viscosa</i> species of plant

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Plagiobothrys stipitatus is a species of flowering plant in the borage family known by the common name stalked popcornflower and stipitate forget-me-not. It is native to Oregon and most of California, where it grows in vernal pools and similar wet habitat types. It is an annual herb producing a narrow, hollow, erect stem up to half a meter tall. It is coated in rough hairs. The pointed, hairy leaves along the stem are up to 11 centimeters long. The inflorescence is a series of five-lobed white flowers 2 millimeters to over one centimeter wide. The fruit is a narrow, ribbed nutlet.

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<i>Solanum parishii</i> species of plant

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<i>Tauschia hartwegii</i> species of plant

Tauschia hartwegii is a species of flowering plant in the carrot family known by the common name Hartweg's umbrellawort. It is endemic to California, where it is known from the Sierra Nevada foothills and some of the Central Coast Ranges. Its habitat includes coniferous woodlands and chaparral. It is a perennial herb growing 30 centimeters to one meter tall. It is coated in short, rough hairs. The leaves have blades which are divided into oval leaflets with serrated edges and borne on long petioles. The inflorescence is a compound umbel of yellow flowers with up to 30 unequal rays measuring 2 to 12 centimeters long each. The fruit is somewhat rounded in shape, ribbed, and under a centimeter long.

<i>Tauschia howellii</i> species of plant

Tauschia howellii is a rare species of flowering plant in the carrot family known by the common names Howell's umbrellawort and Howell's tauschia. It is endemic to the Klamath Mountains of far southern Oregon and far northern California, where it is limited to nine occurrences in the Siskiyou Mountains. It grows in mountain forests on gravelly granite soils, often among stands of Shasta red fir. Despite its rarity it is stable and not considered very endangered. It is a perennial herb growing 30 to 80 centimeters tall. It is hairless in texture. The thick leaves have blades which are divided into leaflets large, sharp teeth and edges curved up, and borne on long petioles. The short inflorescence is a compound umbel of yellow flowers on a few short rays. The fruit is oblong, ribbed, and just a few millimeters long.

Tauschia kelloggii is a species of flowering plant in the carrot family known by the common name Kellogg's umbrellawort. It is native to the mountains of Oregon and the northern half of California, where it grows in chaparral, woodlands, forest, and other types of habitat. It is a perennial herb growing up to 70 centimeters tall. The leaves have blades which are divided into toothed or serrated leaflets, and sometimes subdivided further. The inflorescence is a compound umbel of yellow flowers with 10 to 20 rays measuring 2 to 12 centimeters long each. The fruit is somewhat rounded in shape, ribbed, and up to half a centimeter long.

<i>Thysanocarpus conchuliferus</i> species of plant

Thysanocarpus conchuliferus is a rare species of flowering plant in the mustard family known by the common name Santa Cruz Island fringepod. It is endemic to Santa Cruz Island, one of the Channel Islands of California, where has been recently observed at only one location; some years it is totally absent.

<i>Thysanocarpus curvipes</i> species of plant

Thysanocarpus curvipes is a species of flowering plant in the mustard family known by the common names sand fringepod and lacepod. It is native to western North America from British Columbia through the western United States to Baja California, where it grows in many types of habitat. It is a common plant in much of its range. It is variable in appearance. It is an annual herb producing a branching or unbranched stem 10 to 80 centimeters tall. The leaves are mostly lance-shaped but variable. The lower ones are sometimes borne on petioles and the upper ones may clasp the stem at their bases. They may be smooth-edged, toothed, or lobed. The inflorescence is a raceme of flowers with four white or purple-tinged petals and purple sepals. The fruit is a flattened, rounded or oval disclike capsule with a thin wing around the edge. The fruit is under a centimeter long and the wing is variable in appearance, flat or wavy, sometimes perforated.

<i>Thysanocarpus laciniatus</i> species of plant

Thysanocarpus laciniatus is a species of flowering plant in the mustard family known by the common name mountain fringepod. It is native to California and Baja California, where it grows in many types of habitat. It is a common plant in much of its range. It is an annual herb producing a slender, branching or unbranched stem 10 to 60 centimeters tall. It is somewhat waxy in texture and generally lacks hairs. The leaves are linear to lance-shaped and smooth-edged or toothed. They measure up to 4 centimeters in length. The inflorescence is a raceme of small whitish or purplish flowers. The fruit is a flattened, rounded or oval disclike capsule with a thin wing around the edge.

References

  1. "Thysanocarpus radians". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA . Retrieved 10 December 2015.