Tick Canyon Formation

Last updated
Tick Canyon Formation
Stratigraphic range: Early Miocene
Type Geologic formation
Underlies Mint Canyon Formation
OverliesVasquez Formation
Thickness0–1,000 feet (0–305 m) (average)
Location
Coordinates 34°25′56″N118°23′32″W / 34.43222°N 118.39222°W / 34.43222; -118.39222 Coordinates: 34°25′56″N118°23′32″W / 34.43222°N 118.39222°W / 34.43222; -118.39222 [1]
Region Sierra Pelona Mountains, Los Angeles County, California
Country United States
Type section
Named forTick Canyon

The Tick Canyon Formation is a Miocene epoch geologic formation in the Sierra Pelona Mountains of Los Angeles County, California. [2]

The Miocene is the first geological epoch of the Neogene Period and extends from about 23.03 to 5.333 million years ago (Ma). The Miocene was named by Charles Lyell; its name comes from the Greek words μείων and καινός and means "less recent" because it has 18% fewer modern sea invertebrates than the Pliocene. The Miocene is preceded by the Oligocene and is followed by the Pliocene.

Los Angeles County, California County in California, United States

Los Angeles County, officially the County of Los Angeles, in the Los Angeles metropolitan area of the U.S. state of California, is the single most populous county in the United States, with more than 10 million inhabitants as of 2018. As such, it is the largest non–state level government entity in the United States. Its population is larger than that of 41 individual U.S. states. It is the third-largest metropolitan economy in the world, with a Nominal GDP of over $700 billion—larger than the GDPs of Belgium, Norway, and Taiwan. It has 88 incorporated cities and many unincorporated areas and, at 4,083 square miles (10,570 km2), it is larger than the combined areas of Delaware and Rhode Island. The county is home to more than one-quarter of California residents and is one of the most ethnically-diverse counties in the U.S. Its county seat, Los Angeles, is also California's most populous city and the second most populous city in the U.S., with about 4 million residents.

Contents

The Tick Canyon Basin drains into the Santa Clara River. [3]

Santa Clara River (California) Least altered river in Southern California, 83 miles long

The Santa Clara River is 83 miles (134 km) long, and is one of the most dynamic river systems in Southern California. The river drains parts of four ranges in the Transverse Ranges System north and northwest of Los Angeles, then flows west onto the Oxnard Plain and into the Santa Barbara Channel of the Pacific Ocean.

Geology

The formation was deposited on land mostly by streams and consists of green sandstone, coarse-grained conglomerates, and red claystone. [2] [4] [5] It has an average thickness of 600 feet (180 m). [4]

Sandstone A clastic sedimentary rock composed mostly of sand-sized particles

Sandstone is a clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized mineral particles or rock fragments.

Conglomerate (geology) A coarse-grained clastic sedimentary rock with mainly rounded to subangular clasts

Conglomerate is a coarse-grained clastic sedimentary rock that is composed of a substantial fraction of rounded to subangular gravel-size clasts, e.g., granules, pebbles, cobbles, and boulders, larger than 2 mm (0.079 in) in diameter. Conglomerates form by the consolidation and lithification of gravel. Conglomerates typically contain finer grained sediment, e.g., either sand, silt, clay or combination of them, called matrix by geologists, filling their interstices and are often cemented by calcium carbonate, iron oxide, silica, or hardened clay.

The formation overlies the Oligocene Period Vasquez Formation, and underlies the Upper Miocene Mint Canyon Formation. [2] [4]

The Oligocene is a geologic epoch of the Paleogene Period and extends from about 33.9 million to 23 million years before the present. As with other older geologic periods, the rock beds that define the epoch are well identified but the exact dates of the start and end of the epoch are slightly uncertain. The name Oligocene was coined in 1854 by the German paleontologist Heinrich Ernst Beyrich; the name comes from the Ancient Greek ὀλίγος and καινός, and refers to the sparsity of extant forms of molluscs. The Oligocene is preceded by the Eocene Epoch and is followed by the Miocene Epoch. The Oligocene is the third and final epoch of the Paleogene Period.

The Mint Canyon Formation is a Miocene geologic formation in the Sierra Pelona Mountains of Los Angeles County, southern California.

North of the Tick Canyon fault, the beds are almost vertical. [2]

Fossils

It preserves vertebrate fossils of the Lower Miocene subperiod of the Miocene epoch, in the Neogene Period of the Cenozoic Era. [2] [6]

The Neogene is a geologic period and system that spans 20.45 million years from the end of the Paleogene Period 23.03 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the present Quaternary Period 2.58 Mya. The Neogene is sub-divided into two epochs, the earlier Miocene and the later Pliocene. Some geologists assert that the Neogene cannot be clearly delineated from the modern geological period, the Quaternary. The term "Neogene" was coined in 1853 by the Austrian palaeontologist Moritz Hörnes (1815–1868).

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Tick Canyon Formation
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Elsmerecanyon.com: "Tick Canyon Geology"
  3. "Geologic Map of the Mint Canyon Quadrangle" (DF-57) by Thomas W. Dibblee, Jr., 1996.
  4. 1 2 3 Caltech.edu: THESIS - "Geology of the Upper Tick Canyon area, California"; Birman, Joseph Harold; 1950.
  5. Caltech.edu: THESIS - "Geology of the Mint Canyon area, Los Angeles County, California"; Holser, William T.; 1946.
  6. Various Contributors to the Paleobiology Database. "Fossilworks: Gateway to the Paleobiology Database". Archived from the original on 31 July 2014. Retrieved 8 July 2014.